Kino no Tabi: The Beautiful World


Kino's Journey

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Alternative Titles

English: Kino's Journey
Synonyms: Kino's Travels: The Beautiful World
Japanese: キノの旅 -the Beautiful World-

Information

Type: TV
Episodes: 13
Status: Finished Airing
Aired: Apr 8, 2003 to Jul 8, 2003
Premiered: Spring 2003
Broadcast: Tuesdays at 18:30 (JST)
Studios: A.C.G.T.
Source: Light novel
Genres: ActionAction, AdventureAdventure, PsychologicalPsychological, Slice of LifeSlice of Life
Duration: 24 min. per ep.
Rating: R - 17+ (violence & profanity)

Statistics

Score: 8.321 (scored by 7525175,251 users)
1 indicates a weighted score.
Ranked: #2132
2 based on the top anime page. Please note that 'Not yet aired' and 'R18+' titles are excluded.
Popularity: #674
Members: 240,910
Favorites: 5,602
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Preliminary
Mar 19, 2007
Kayrhandros (All reviews)
Ok, so this will be my first review for MAL. I've written for other resources but haven't done so for a while, so bear with me.


I've recently finished this anime, and I can say I am still surprised. Although I heard rumors that this was something really good, I tend to be skeptic and so I was caught of guard. Why?

Let's start with the story, which tells of the journey of a traveler and his motorcycle, while they visit a long range of countries or just meet someone on the way. The actual fact is: there isn't one sole story but 12 short stories that read more
Jul 20, 2008
kumarei (All reviews)
Kino's Journey is a collection of societal parables, told through the eyes of a wanderer who visits countries and observes them. Kino, the main character, takes a somewhat prime directive stance toward the civilizations, although she is sometimes coaxed to interfere out of compassion.

The show is a collection of parables, and as such, the societies it portrays are exaggerated portraits of a certain societal trait. It's possible that some viewers will feel as if they're being beaten over the head with the moral on some of the episodes. As for me, I thought that it was refreshingly straightforward, and had no problem read more
Nov 20, 2009
Redward (All reviews)
*This Review may contain spoilers*

This is Kino's Journey? I'd rather stay at home.

What many people believe to be a great series, Kino's Journey is a collection of short stories revolving around different countries, customs, traditions and beliefs. The main character Kino travels to these countries with her talking motorcycle pal Hermes, and together they observe the world through outside perspectives.

In fact, its almost as if Kino is nothing more than a representation of the viewer. Kino does nothing but observe....ever. She never interferes or judges or saves, when she so easily could. She does nothing but watch the people of these countries act like morons, read more
Nov 10, 2006
Chelle (All reviews)
What do you say about an anime that is just about a traveler, journeying to different countries on the back of her talking motorcycle. Sounds boring, right? WRONG!!! This episodic anime, through odd little stories and dialogue, actually explores different aspects of human nature, in one of the most unique ways I have ever seen.
There is little to no character development, but in this kind of story, there is no need. There is one episode that gives the back story to Kino, and that was enough.
The different countries Kino visits, and the people Kino encounters will make you cry, will enrage read more
Nov 26, 2014
BlerdGirl (All reviews)
I stumbled onto this anime without knowing what to expect. Once I started watching it, I became very moved by it.

One of the best aspects of this anime is the story. Each episode is a parable about the darker side of human nature, especially when it comes to being heartless and ignorant. These parables are based on scenarios that could actually exist in the real world and make the viewer think about their personal ethics as well as the ethics of others. Yet, despite the hard truths, there is an element of hope that comes from the anime's main character, Kino.

Kino has become my number read more
Jun 17, 2012
Yuna (All reviews)
One of the biggest criticisms the anime medium constantly faces is that it merely a form of entertainment. With the abundance of shows, especially in the recent years, that are evidently nothing more than blatant attempts to cater to hormone-overflowing young men with endless amounts of fanservice, it is easy to see why many skeptics share this common misconception. And while there are numerous titles that break the mold and provide watchers with much more than just flashy action sequences featuring gun-toting, well-endowed girls, a great deal are quickly forgotten, destined to only be watched by a small fraction of individuals who are read more
Jan 8, 2008
Beatnik (All reviews)
These 13 episodes are packed with compelling storylines all revolving around the character of Kino who is journeying from fictional country to country on her motorbike.

The animation is acceptable, nothing fancy but enough to keep your attention. The music adequate, servicing the tale with audial emotion. The direction satisfactory, a worthy adaptation that has faith in the source material.

Where this anime shines is in the story which is undoubtedly the most important factor of any moving picture with a narrative. Kino's Journey has masterful storytelling at its core, each episode is like a fairy tale, a myth, a legend, a lesson. read more
Nov 28, 2017
AndoCommando (All reviews)
“Someone once told me that watching the birds made them want to go on a journey.”

What’s more important, the journey or the destination? Usually this type of question requires a level of context to be able to answer properly. Sometimes the journey is nothing more than simple steps required in order to achieve something. Other times it’s the paths you take that leave the most impact overtime. If you were to ask me, I would generally say that the journey holds more weight as the journey is where one is able to grow and learn about themselves and the world around them. The destination, to read more
Sep 24, 2007
Venneh (All reviews)
Title: Kino no Tabi: The Beautiful World

Novel/Anime: Kino no Tabi originally began as a series of light novels, authored by Keichii Sigsawa and illustrated by Kouhaku Kuroboshi. Installments began running in MediaWorks' magazine Dengeki hp in March 2000, and it is still running, currently with ten compiled volumes available. Tokyopop has licensed the light novels Stateside, and the first volume was released in October of 2006.

The anime itself was done by Studio Wombat, which did the animation for the End of Evangelion movie, and directed by Ryutaro Nakamura, who also directed REC and Serial Experiment Lain. It ran from April 8th, 2003 read more
Feb 28, 2013
mahoganycow (All reviews)
I was reminded of some lines I'd long since forgotten:

“To ride, shoot straight, and speak the truth,
this was the ancient law of youth.”

For Kino, the riding and the shooting come easily enough. But in a series of encounters with strange places and people, she quickly learns that the truths of the world are far harder to grasp than the motorcycle's handlebars, or the grips of the revolver.

Kino's world is an attractive wash of natural pastels, with earthy yellows, greens, and browns taking the center stage. The backgrounds aren't highly detailed, but they match the tones and colors we associate with nature, and they're striking in read more
Feb 1, 2019
literaturenerd (All reviews)
Overview:

I continue my trilogy of reviews covering legitimately great anime to celebrate 300 reviews here on MAL. Kino's Journey is a 2003 anime directed by the late great Ryutaro Nakamura. It was adapted from a series of light novels written by a guy who uses the pen name "Sigsawa". Everyone get your groans out of the way now. At first this seems like an odd pairing because Nakamura was a super artsy dude. Kind of like a Woody Allen...without the alleged pedophilia. On the other hand, "Sigsawa" is a man absolutely obsessed with guns, hunting, motorcycles, American muscle cars, and all things MANLY. Sigsawa's favorite read more
Feb 6, 2015
Riothamus12 (All reviews)
It's difficult to sum up Kino's Journey in words. The only words that come close are unique and stunning. The premise is simple. It follows the journey of a traveler and her talking motorcycle as they travel from place to place and encounter many unusual cultures and customs in the process. However, this simple summary falls short of giving a potential viewer any deep sense of what they're about to see. Each episode explores elements of society and human nature with a rare sense of beauty, touching upon the addressed themes with a sense of pathos that entire series dedicated to them may fail read more
Jul 22, 2012
Phaetons_Folly (All reviews)
A journey can be a pivotal point in a person’s life. It provides an opportunity for a person to experience a new world where they encounter new ideas and do things they have never done before. More importantly, a journey allows is a time of self-discovery. Interacting with a new culture forces a person to evaluate their own beliefs and customs that may seem natural to them, but may soon learn they are not intuitive. It is also an opportunity to see that there are things that are universal for all cultures. It is this power that a journey has read more
Oct 25, 2010
firewhale (All reviews)
Kino's Journey:

I enjoyed the series. Since each individual episode was self-contained, it was easy to slowly work my way through it. And even though each episode was self-contained, I found myself invested in Kino and Hermes (Hermes is Kino's talking motorcycle). As a traveler, Kino visited several countries that represented different facets of society and human psychology (sometimes exaggerated to a ridiculous extent). Regardless of a country's strange or even deplorable customs, Kino would oftentimes take a stance of non-interference. And even though Kino took the role of an onlooker many times, she showed that she was a strong character that is easy to like.

The read more
Sep 12, 2008
naikou (All reviews)
Kino's Journey is a masterpiece of minimal storytelling. It combines slice-of-life, philosphy, adventure, mystery, and action to form a seamless entity that is unique among anime. Long after you've seen the series, you'll find yourself drawing connections between it and reality... which, I suppose, is the mark of true art.

Story
The box art features Kino dual-wielding her pistols, looking over her shoulder with an intimidating glare. During the opening sequence, Kino fires off a round of shots into a cement wall with a look as calm as a Buddha statue. This is not a particularly good representation of the series. While the episodes do occasionally feature read more
Aug 16, 2013
5camp (All reviews)
My shorthand way of describing Kino’s Journey is that it’s Aesop’s Fables the Anime. The characters do not act like real humans, nor do their dialogue and actions seem like those of normal humans. That is because it is not a story about people. It’s a story about society. It’s about democracy and religion and work and the things we take for granted because we do not question these societal constructs.

The story follows Kino, a perfectly nice fellow as he travels from country to country on his talking motorbike, staying in each country for only 3 days. The importance behind the 3 day rule is read more
May 15, 2019
Rezto (All reviews)
*This is my first review. Please feel free to give feedback on my profile; I would highly appreciate it.*

Kino’s Journey is a masterful amalgamation of short stories which ingeniously explore the societal issues faced by independent countries; be they big or small, rich or poor, urban or rural, industrial or domestic, or authoritarian or libertarian, to only scrape the surface.

These stories are told through the eyes of the observant, young, androgynous female traveller, Kino – the main character – who appears to take a rather laissez-faire stance towards the struggles of the people in the majority of countries she embarks. However, when needed, her read more
Jan 17, 2015
JustGoodAnime (All reviews)
"Warning: Kino's Journey has been known to induce a strong feeling of wanderlust in its viewers. It has also been proven to boost levels of empathy. Watch at your own risk."

But in all seriousness, like most anthology styled shows, "Kino's Journey" is somewhat difficult to review in its entirety. Instead of presenting one narrative with a beginning, middle, and end, it presents several self-contained stories, each with their own conflict and resolution. The only thing that stays the same is that each episode is seen through the eyes of series protagonist and professional traveler Kino, and her talking bike, Hermes.

I've seen that the show has read more
Jan 17, 2009
HumanAdventure (All reviews)
Kino's Journey has about three or four outstanding episodes. The rest are mediocre with the occasional inspired scene or two. The draw of the show seems to be that it's supposed to be cerebral, the kind of show that makes you think. I have only just recently watched Kino's Journey all the way through and can only remember what half of the episodes are about.

I think the biggest weakness is that while Kino and Hermes are pretty interesting characters, rarely do you get any real interest in the people they meet. I think the pace of the show is too quick. The country of the read more
Aug 21, 2010
ShonenBat (All reviews)
Kino's Journey is unique from other amine’s that it doesn't have any of the typical standards that usually pull a person in to a show. Gratuitous amounts of violence, and/or sex are absent, as well as the typical cast card board cutout anime girls with rainbow florescent hair and puppy dog eyes. In fact you probably won't realize that the main character (Kino) is a girl until you actually watch it. The animation is plain the sound sparse and the characters underdeveloped. This is because all these things play backseat to what is the real focus of the anime, deeply profound exploration of the questions read more