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Aug 16, 2017
Substance over style, style over substance? Pretty visuals, or powerful plots? Glamorous production, or memorable themes? Sometimes it feels like writers and producers often ask themselves this question as a way of deciding what part of the show to sacrifice in service for another—a tightly written, genuinely complex narrative or brilliant visuals, dizzying cinematography and a high-flown music backing? Sometimes as a viewer it feels like we have to ask ourselves the same question—what I just watched, did I enjoy it superficially or was it something deeper than that? Why does one matter more than the other? Sometimes I have to ask myself if I read more
Apr 5, 2017
Onihei (Anime) add (All reviews)
On one side of a brittle, canvas Shoji, lies a group of bandits—found in all shapes and sizes, though all donning the same, uniform black garments. Whispering to themselves in memorization the code of a true thief: to never kill, to never rape, and to never, ever steal from the poor whose earnings come from good work. More meaningless muttering occurs throughout the mob as they neatly organize their arsenal of tools; small daggers, picks for a lock, and of course their sharpened Katana—they don’t dare be spotted without one. On the other side of that same, brittle, canvas Shoji, lies a concealed troop of read more
Mar 25, 2017
Seiren (Anime) add (All reviews)
If I had two words to describe Seiren, one would be “uninspired” and the other would be “bizarre”. I’ll be honest, I’m one of those consumers that values unquantifiable things like creativity, innovation and, if at the right time, something that pushes the boundaries of the medium.

I don’t expect all shows to have this sort of thing, after all part of why I value those things is because of their sparsity within the medium. More often than not I just come across shows that have varying extents of those things and that’s definitely serviceable; I’m not expecting every show I watch to be the next read more
Feb 20, 2017
Have you ever heard of the idiom “the one who got away”? To be fair, it’s akin more to a concept or a theme than just a phrase. It’s an idiom reflective of a disheartening reality that fortunately few people can relate to. It’s a concept expressed in many mediums, from music to film, but also anime. Growing pains, love over great distances and disillusion with the fantasy of love are all themes cut from this same cloth.

The phrase itself refers to the one previous partner whom a relationship was shared with, and for one circumstance or another things fell apart and it just didn’t read more
Dec 28, 2016
Gi(a)rlish Number is certainly not the anime you think it is. Its sickeningly ideal group photo as the flagship header of the title would lead most seasonal anime consumers to think that the title is nothing other than another skin-deep value-less moe title that does nothing other than behave incessantly saccharine throughout its entire cour. Girlish Number couldn’t be farther from that reality, definitely not with Wataru Watari’s writing credits.

While Watari procrastinates indefinitely on releasing that highly anticipated yet elusive Volume 12 of OreGairu, he’s been keeping himself busy with other works such as Qualidea Code and this season’s Girlish Number. Typically when established writers read more
Dec 22, 2016
One of the reasons why I find the anime medium as alluring as I do is in part because of its inherent creativity. This may sound strange, considering that the general consensus amongst heavy consumers of the medium is that most modern anime is rife with trite, overused tropes and overused storylines. Carbon copies of previous successes, duplicates of tried and tested formulas that end up feeling vapid, lifeless, and downright boring.
But I insist, the anime medium is special and unique, and full of so many original ideas that have inspired a variety of award-winning, blockbuster hits in the west. From Satoshi Kon inspiring read more
Oct 8, 2016
Ahh, Daft Punk; easily one of my all time favourite musicians. Up until now I’ve considered myself a reasonably massive fan of theirs, but that has temporarily changed as I have now discovered something that I should have long known before—they have an anime feature. I didn’t even find out about this by browsing their Wikipedia page, or looking at random Daft Punk facts, but rather, by randomly entering their name into MAL’s search engine on a whim. I mean, Kanye goddamn West is on here, so what’s stopping my other favourite artists on here? I casually type in Gabrielle Aplin, John Legend, Drake… nothing, read more
Sep 25, 2016
Rewrite (Anime) add (All reviews)
A lot of anime each season tends to adapt material from a different medium. Manga, light novels, videogames, and sometimes even visual novels. Of all of them, a visual novel is arguably the hardest to adapt. Why, you ask? Since visual visuals novels tend to have branching narratives with multiple possible storylines and alternate endings, it’s difficult to simply “choose” one to adapt or adapt the “right” one and pull out a good anime from.
Decisions made by the player during the game compound on top of one another and can eventually change which storypath the VN goes down and lead to an alternate ending. read more
Sep 22, 2016
There are two types of anime I consider a “5”: those with an equal force of determinants and merits, and those that follow a formulaic and mediocre narrative used quite often. The difference is that shows described by the former are usually on the negative side, whereas shows described by the latter can still be a good watch; Konobi is the latter.

Produced by studio feel (who’ve brought the likes of OreGairu and Kiss x Sis) comes “This Art Club has a Problem!”, a hilarious, lighthearted rom-com with emphasis on “com”; Seriously, this show is funny. Definitely one of the greatest strengths of this show is read more
Sep 20, 2016
Genericism is a very interesting thing. Shows we label “generic” are almost always inferior, so it is only natural to wonder why every season, without fail, there is an overabundance of them. One of the most common symptoms of genericism is that you can easily predict more things than should be predicted simply by taking a glance at the synopsis or poster. You might take one look at Taboo Tattoo’s poster and promptly dismiss it as generic, but I’m here to tell you that it is not. It may seem like it, it may start of like it, but no, I assure you, it isn’t; read more