Back to aikaflip's Profile aikaflip's Profile

Apr 13, 2018
AIKa (Anime) add (All reviews)
Agent Aika opens with a leisurely tour of the waters that are now covering Saitama. This Japanese city—along with 95% of the world's land—was submerged after a worldwide disaster twenty years ago. Salvaging work to recover valuable goods and data from these abandoned areas has become a booming profession.

An attractive fighter and submarine pilot, Aika Sumeragi, and her spunky megane partner, Rion Aida, pursue salvaging work at the K2 Corporation that's headed by Rion's father, Gozo Aida. Rion is frustrated with her father's overly generous business practices that have lost profits for the company. Through Aika's intervention, they agree to a shady business proposition read more
Sep 20, 2016
Stiff and inconsistent animation with 90's quality computer graphics; monotonous, boob-obsessed fanservice; vapid characters who yell and clinch their fists a lot to create the illusion of emotion where there is none.

Masou Gakuen HxH is an uninspired clone of better anime that was produced with an appropriately low budget. It takes the premise from Infinite Stratos about the one guy with an ability to help attractive female fighters, and mashes it with the master-slave relationships from Shinmai Maou no Testament using a big tit-shaped sledgehammer. HxH lacks the fun of the former, and the sex appeal of the latter.

On the positive side, Kizuna, the main read more
Mar 25, 2016
“Ruin is the salvation of man and machine.”

Beneath the flamboyant exterior of fast action fight scenes and fancy shot compositions are some deceptively complex themes. The director, Shigeyasu Yamauchi, who has a propensity for stylish psychological studies, uses Casshern Sins as an opportunity to deconstruct death and hope.

The first episode establishes the premise with a satisfying level of badassery. In the distant future, Robots have evolved sentience, and can feel emotions like humans can. A global "Ruin"—with a capital R, implying that it's more than an action—was prompted when Casshern, a highly skilled and gaudily dressed fighter, "killed the Sun named Moon." Now both humans read more
Sep 5, 2015
In short, Planetes is about politics, terrorism, and the power of Love with a capital L. For much of the show, characters are expounding their ideals or schemes, which are inelegantly weaved with jarringly cartoonish comedy and contrived scenarios that distract from any message that it hopes to convey.

For an example of such contrivances, in episode 5 we're introduced to a pickpocket thief, a couple who plan on killing themselves, and their daughter. Believing that there was money or other valuables inside one of the couple's cases, the thief unknowingly steals their suicide pills, subsequently thwarting their plans.

But wait, there's more...

On another end read more
Aug 23, 2015
Our journey with Ginko, which started in 1999, draws to an end with an adaptation of Suzu no Shizuku (Drops of Bells), the last arc of the acclaimed Mushishi manga by Yuki Urushibara.

In the first half of Suzu no Shizuku, a girl leaves her family behind when she’s summoned to be the next lord of a mountain. Thriving lands, called “Rivers of Light”, require the presence of a lord to maintain the balance of life around that area. Choosing a human as a lord is an unusual move, however. Such a task is usually delegated to animals since they live with fewer emotional attachments.

Several of read more
Aug 21, 2015
A person falling in love with an attractive werewolf or vampire is a familiar theme in shapeshifter stories. What's less familiar is for this story to extend beyond the relationship, and detail the hardships of raising "half breed" children in a prejudiced society.

On the surface, such a premise may seem absurd, but Wolf Children works thanks to the decision of writer/director Mamoru Hosoda to take a fantasy story and package it as a coming-of-age drama. There's a lot of wonderful humor here, but the characters and their experiences are taken with the utmost seriousness.

Hana is the quintessential altruistic mother who’s always acting for the benefit read more
Aug 10, 2015
There’s some debate about whether or not Bakemonogatari (pr. bah-keh-moh-no-gah-tah-re) is an ecchi-harem. A mere six seconds into the first episode, one of the female leads is introduced with a panty shot, and several shots of panties, boobs, and butts are dispersed throughout the series. Aside from two characters that appear in a few episodes, Araragi, the main character, is the only male, and he’s usually surrounded by females who’ve developed a fondness for him after he helped them in some way.

Is it an ecchi? Most likely. Is it a harem? Probably. Nevertheless, what distinguishes this series from other ecchi and harem anime is that read more
Aug 9, 2015
“I wish I was dead.”

These are the opening words of Mardock Scramble, spoken by 15-year old prostitute Rune Balot, that set the downcast and existential tone for the rest of the series.

The story is set in Mardock City, a futuristic world where the skyline is filled with skyscrapers, cars glide on fluorescent green roads, and everything sparkles like champagne. It’s a stunning place to look at, but it’s also a savage place where cruelty and crime are often left unpunished.

Homicide has become so rampant that the government has authorized a controversial procedure to resurrect victims so that they can testify against their assailants. This is read more
Aug 3, 2015
Born 10 years before the start of World War II, Anne Frank was a young Jewish writer who was forced to live in a cramped hiding area with her family to avoid Nazi persecution. During her stay there, she documented her life in a now famous diary, which has since been adapted into movies, plays, and even an anime.

I was surprised to hear that an anime of Anne Frank's diary had been made—by Madhouse, no less, one of my favorite studios. I'd known about Anne Frank’s story for a while, but I avoided it because I feared that it might be too depressing for me read more
Jul 31, 2015
Texhnolyze is a show about heavy breathing, grunting, and a pissing contest between a group of gun and sword wielding alpha males in suits who speak in bad mob movie cliches. If you force your imagination enough, you may be able to find something deep in the recesses of this art, but the same could be done if you stared long enough at the textures on a rusty frying pan.

There's a subplot about "texhnolyzation", a procedure to repair or upgrade a person using technologies such as mechanical limbs. The transhumanist ideas herein, which have potential, are unfortunately enveloped in a lot of empty atmosphere. Most read more