Kawahara, Reki

Kawahara, Reki

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Family name: 川原
Alternate names: Fumio Kunori, 九里 史生, WordGear
Birthday: Aug 17, 1974
Website: http://wordgear.sblo.jp/
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Birth place: Takasaki, Gunma Prefecture, Japan
Current residence: Nerima, Tokyo, Japan
Hobby: Cycling
Doujin circle: WordGear

Kawahara Reki graduated from the Aoyama Gakuin University.

Twitter: @kunori

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Comments Only the latest 10 comments are displayed.
Berzan | Today, 2:16 AM
I like to say that Kirito has two main phases of development: the Aincrad phase and the post-Aincrad phase. The first logically becomes clearer in Progressive, because that's where you really have time for it to be shown with calm and tranquility, but I'll stick to the original work. finding out he was adopted. He felt isolated and tried to escape to another world, so much so that he mentions that at the time of the beta, he spent all the time with NerveGear in his head to isolate himself from the real world and the people there. In addition to his business being adopted and such, there is also the issue of his grandfather, but I think this structure is already legal. Anyway, then he gets stuck in this world, and as the antisocial person that he is, he refuses to go along with Klein's friends and leaves alone. Time passes and those events happen in the boss room on the first floor, where Kirito declares himself as a beater. He declared himself that way because even though he was antisocial, he still had a good heart, which is completely consistent, even because he helped Klein to train in the first episode. So he declared himself as "The Beater" to stay as the villain of story and so that other beta testers, like Diabel (the guy who died in this fight, and speaking of him, he had his death changed in the anime, and there is an error exclusive to the anime), and Argo were not treated badly by other players. From there, he follows the floors with Asuna and Argo, but I'm not going to talk about that part because it's Progressive. Anyway, some time passes and Kirito becomes a solo player (which makes total sense in the structure of the game, where you have to share EXP with party members and such (you can even name similar RPGs like Elsword, for example) Anyway, until he met a guild and gradually he finally managed to fit in. He even lies at his level to be able to fit in with them, which shows a certain selfishness on his part (something that will be played more Anyway, the conclusion is that everything goes wrong, everyone gets fucked, and he gets psychologically shaken and isolates himself again, because he saw a lot of important people for him dying in front of him and still has the feeling of guilt. in that ... these deaths will be important later on, in Alicization, when the same thing happens, only this time it’s the mature Kirito who has to deal with it. Anyway, little by little he gets to know other people, like Lisbeth and Silica, in addition to meeting K several times lein and Agil. These meetings are important because in each one of them, Kirito helps someone in something, or interacts in a friendly way with someone, which leads him to progress a little bit more, until the moment when Asuna definitely returns in his life. (which in the anime is there in that episode of the rabbit), and the two start to progress in the romance together and no longer in a friendship. The moral is that he ends up with Aincrad as someone else, having learned a lot during those two years. This is where post-Aincrad development begins, which I will talk about later on, but Aincrad-style development extends a little bit to Phantom Bullet, which is where PTSD starts to attack Kirito effectively. In Fairy Dance, this didn't even have time to happen, since he is like an extension of Aincrad. Kirito still had to save Asuna for that nightmare to end. When he sees the Death Gun and remembers the events related to the Smiling Coffin in Aincrad. Here, continuity is given in that case of Kirito's selfishness, where it shows that he killed two people out of pure revenge, when he did not need to have done so. Anyway, the Phantom Bullet closes this together with the Sinon arc, with all that message about balance and how many lives you have saved with your actions.
Now, as for post-Aincrad development, here I refer to Kirito aged 16 to 18, who left Aincrad and gradually started to acquire his own ideals. This, in addition to being motivated by Kikouka, who was Kirito's gateway to the real world after the game incident, still has to do with the robotics forums that Kirito mentions he is starting to attend. At this point you can already see a big difference in Kirito, a young prisoner who isolated himself from the world, but who now, in addition to having many friends to trust, still managed to deal with family problems, he even managed to get a job at Rath, and debated with several people in English on the internet. This ideal that I discussed there is what I see as the biggest message of SAO, and I can even get some prints to demonstrate this to you later, but anyway, the trigger for this is in a dialogue between Kirito and Kikouka at the beginning of Phantom Bullet about regulation (which is an agenda that clearly after an incident like the one in SAO, people would start to argue). Regu technology, I mean. This is something that is even present here in Brazil and is something that limits progress (I imagine that some here are ancaps, so understand what I'm talking about). This is the theme that SAO addresses at this point in the development of Kirito. Kikouka says in this dialogue that people wanted to regulate the technology and that it was coming back on the agenda even after the SAO incident because of the suspicions of death there in the case of the Death Gun. What Kikouka wanted to confirm was that those deaths were not being caused by the technology itself, and they really weren't, proving that the regulation would be meaningless. From that, all Kirito's actions are based on the concept of freedom, or at least he tries to base everything on it. This is very noticeable in Alicization, which is where several debates about it are thrown directly at you, whether by through metalinguistic messages, such as the concept of Incarnation (which is something that has been addressed since the beginning of the work, back in Aincrad, and many people treat it as a scoop, since it is an incredibly well planned business), or through dialogues same, like for example one from Kirito, with Eugeo, Ronie and Tiese, where he says that it is not because something is in the law that this is objectively correct, but that you should be based on an ideal to say if that is really correct (why, slavery was already in the law, and even then, it was never objectively correct, because it was always something that hurt someone's freedom). There are other examples, like one of Kirito with Eugeo talking about the fact that the Church of Axiom has disarmed the population, that is, preventing them from rebelling against tyrannical attitudes, or Kirito's conversation with Alice outside the tower, where the Kirito questions the morals of that world, something impossible for Alice, who had her mind washed to accept everything by the law of the goddesses that Quinella claimed to represent.
I spoke here of just a few points. I didn't even mention the black swordsman title, which is a topic that I really like to talk about, because I see several people misinterpreting it, acting as if Kirito really used that title, when in fact he never even liked to hear it somebody say that. SAO is a work with more implicit text and between the lines than it seems (that's why I like it so much), but then a lot of people end up interpreting the work and the wrong Kirito, especially with this gigantic wave of hate that has formed over the years .
Now starting by answering your first point: I don't mean that there was no time for Kirito's relations to develop. They went. What I mean is that, logically, 75 floors would not be expected to be transcribed in two books with the same approach as Progressive (which does not detract from the original work, they are just different approaches, both canonical and connected). also calling with an excerpt later, in which you talk about the novel, it is useful to highlight here that when I quote something cut in the anime or that it was done badly in it, I don't want to justify an error of the anime based on the novel, but yes demonstrate that this error is unrelated to the author. Besides the fact that this discussion was never limited to anime, I imagine, so there is no problem in highlighting the novel, since we are talking about Kirito, or rather, Kiritos (novel and anime). .. You said that I quoted an excerpt that is only present in the novel, referring to the party experience system, however, among all the information in the novel that helps to expand the wealth of the world, such as the functioning of the Beast Trainer system and Aincrad's anti-harassment system, that specific information has not been cut and is in the context of the anime. You also mentioned that, if this information was inserted in the anime, then Kirito is poorly written or was written with the intention of being stupid. I am not sure if I understood what you meant by that, but it would not be much more related to the question of selfishness that I addressed and that the work itself tires of talking about (mainly in the novel, with the monologues of Kirito, but still present in the anime). I saw that you questioned the relationship between selfishness and the fact that he was a good person, and this is something that I myself questioned myself for some time, but I will address this later, I will just conclude the points you addressed earlier. it's interesting because you mentioned Homura, one of my favorite characters, even above Miyamoto Musashi, a character who has a history with me and with whom I have a great respect, not only as a character, but as a real person (I have even the book of the five rings and the reading is very rewarding, by the way kkkk). That said, I imagine you watched Madoka Rebellion, as I’m going to quote a passage from him here (but relax, I won’t give spoilers if you haven’t). Well, Madoka Rebellion has in herend one of the biggest plot twists i've ever seen in terms of scale. The change of Homura during the TV series is something very simple to be interpreted, having its twists at the end of the series. Meanwhile, in Rebellion, many people criticize the ending for it "happening out of nowhere" or for the work "not being prepared for it". The point is that Homura de Rebellion has a much more "under the hood" development, or, to make it easier, implied than in the TV series. The "bridges" that you mentioned exist, they just aren't there for anyone to see, and that's what makes the Rebellion so interesting. Watching the film several times, you are able to notice several excerpts from dialogues that are of extreme importance for the whole Homura turn at the end. These dialogues are either repeated, but slightly altered, or complemented by later dialogues or monologues. The point is that Kiritão here is very similar to the Rebellion's Homura in this regard. The "bridges" in development are very subtle and so they can give the wrong impression to some people, as it was your case now and as it was also my case, linking there with the relationship of selfishness with the fact that Kirito is a good person.Now, a paragraph about a quick excerpt from you. You said that the Moonlight Black Cats guild should constitute the most important group of characters in the Aincrad arc, however, I fear that this is a confusion caused mainly by the narrative style adopted by the anime in the first arc. As I said, it is not a justification for an error in the anime based on the novel, but a demonstration that his argument fails to criticize Kawahara in the middle of it all. As you may already know, the novel does not adopt a chronological order, and it is not as if this were random. You spend the entire volume 1 knowing that Kirito went through a trauma when he saw all the members of his guild die, only to be graced with their story in the last chapter of volume 2. This is a very interesting narrative style because events are not justified by actions, but actions are justified by events. Kirito's attitudes in volume 1 start to link after reading the last story in volume 2, which is why it is so interesting. Meanwhile, instead of adapting Aincrad in two films (one for each volume), he decided to adapt it in 14 episodes and in a chronological order, which suggests that the narrative would follow a conventional style. is the part that I most wanted to talk about), it is important to highlight that you addressed a contradiction of mine and / or the work, however, this is what makes Kirito a character with layers. Although he is selfish, he is a good person. He's a human. When categorizing a character as selfish, this does not mean that he has to act selfishly 100% of the time. Let's talk about Klein's example in the first episode, which was his first approach. Kirito really helped Klein. Why did he do it? There are several plausible answers here, such as the duality between the real and the virtual world, addressed in Phantom Bullet, or the wish of Kirito, a lonely young man, to find a friend and make him a partner, or even a selfish will. , like to charge Klein afterwards eventually. But anyway, the interesting thing is that none of this comes to the point. None of this conflicts with his selfishness precisely because he has other reasons for carrying out his actions, whatever they may be. Moral of the story: after he helps Klein and Kayaba make the announcement, Kirito leaves alone, then yes selfishly, not only for Klein, but for all the other players, since Aincrad has limited resources and he conquered a good part for him. So, basically, you can be a good person even if you have the defect of selfishness, after all, we all have defects, and that is exactly what humanizes Kirito.
3rd episode: Kirito helps the guild after being very reluctant, and when invited to join it, he takes a selfish attitude when hiding his level, knowing that the members would not accept him if they knew he was on the front lines. He was not concerned with the feelings and the safety of others simply because he felt welcomed.
4th episode: Kirito helps Silica for his personal reasons. He even tells her that he missed his sister and thought they looked alike. Also, a good person, even a selfish one, would not, under any circumstances, let another person die with the power to protect him.
5th / 6th episode: Kirito helps in the investigation at Asuna's personal request. An investigation that simply fell into his lap. A bad characterization would put him to shit for this problem, and not to accept to solve it.
7th episode: Here you yourself explained that it is at your own expense. I see no relation to him being "good" and any of the topics discussed here.
8th episode: He does have involvement with Asuna. Progressive tells their detailed story, but it has nothing to do here. Kirito in the classic novel already knew Asuna personally.9 episode: He helps the Liberation Army of Aincrad by sending them the dungeon map, which he always did, and which later on you discover that he did not in order to help anyone, but not to feel guilty for the deaths indirectly for him, that is, again at his own detriment.
12th episode: Try to help to find Yui's parents. And here you can argue that the fact that he helped Yui is inconsistent in relation to selfishness, but I apply the same things that I said in the example of Silica. Do you see a child all hurt and confused in the middle of a forest in a game of death? What would any normal person do, whether they are selfish or not?
So, as I said, he genuinely wants to help others just because he helps a little bit, to finally become that good and wise guy we have in Alicization, who has more personal conflicts related to personal weakness than emotional relationships itself. His own journey with Eugeo is much more for Eugeo than for himself. There was no guarantee that he would ever be able to return to the human world. What happened there was that he was going on a journey with a partner, now with a real intention to help. And that is because we are talking about only one point in this development. Kirito grows on so many points that when I study the work myself, I discover things that I had not previously noticed. We haven't even touched on the countless promises he made from Aincrad to halfway through Alicization. Empty promises, which he could not keep. I will talk a little about them: "You will definitely be able to go back to the real world someday" -Kirito to Sachi.

"I'm 99% sure that the Death Gun is just a rumor. I'll be fine" -Kirito for Asuna.

"We will be able to restore Alice's memories and we will return to Rulid with her" -Kirito to Eugeo.

"The three of us will come back together, safe and sound" - Kirito to Selka. Kirito has been making these promises since the beginning, and this comes as a shock when several of his companions die in the battle against the Church of Axiom. SAO is a well-planned story. Keep in mind that even the promises he made in Alicization are already a reflection of good planning, since it is an arc that begins in volume 9 and only comes to have this shock in volume 14, that is, there are five whole books for one thing from the back of the reflection in the front. This is a good structure. And that without considering the previous promises, from Aincrad, Fairy Dance, etc. Now, going back to a topic you touched on: PTSD. Well, you said that Kawahara did not prepare this "since always", but I will demonstrate here why it is only present in Phantom Bullet. And yes, again, it is consistent. I imagine I don't remember, but there is a scene in which Yui justifies why she felt like meeting Kirito and Asuna. Yui is an AI of the Cardinal System created with the intention of serving psychological assistance to players. For this reason, she was constantly monitoring each player, although the system prevented her from doing her job as in the Beta it was designed to do. Yui decided to meet Kirito and Asuna because their psychological state at that time was totally different from that of all the other players. After all they went through, they finally stopped their lives in order to grow up together, and it did them a lot of good, so much so that in numerous dialogues at the hut, Asuna mentions that she would not see a problem anymore if that game couldn’t be finished and who now no longer lived in fear. Anyway, the arc of Aincrad comes to an end, but the terror of the game of death does not disappear, because as Kirito himself says, the game does not end until he is able to get Asuna out of NerveGear. That is, Fairy Dance does not have time to breathe. It is an extremely dynamic sequence and that is why Kirito's suffering is not related to PTSD in this arc, but to something more like personal growth and the possibility of him being able to save Asuna or no. Now, with the end of Fairy Dance, then the conflicts of Aincrad have an "end" (I put in quotes because several times, the conflicts there reappear in some way or have some reflection later) and then the PTSD can end up having reflexes, because now the trauma is over, and PTSD is a post-traumatic disorder, not a disorder that happens during the trauma. And, well, in connection with what I said earlier, the trigger for PTSD is just a character from Caixão Sorridente. As I said, Aincrad conflicts that have a reflection on the front. And just concluding with facts to reinforce my point: the SAO web novel was written in 2002. You said that yourself, but you made a mistake. From 2002 to 2009 (from the web novel to the official light novel), there wasn’t just " small additions ", and yes, a huge overhaul of all the arcs was made. The Phantom Bullet arc, for example, has been completely rewritten. To reinforce this, it is enough to note that, although the story until Alicization Lasting (volume 18) was already completed in 2009, this same volume was only released in 2016, which is a very large launch window, since several Alicization volumes could come together and form one, as they are small. So it is not a random insertion or "out of nowhere", since all the arcs since the first were completely restructured and redesigned in the publication of the official light novel. You also quickly touched on the concept of Incarnation and once again made a faux pas. It is not an almost "exclusive" feature "from NerveGear. It is much more related to Seed than to NerveGear / AmuSphere / STL. That is, without also considering that all of this equipment has the same structural basis.1- Incarnation is not a plot device used only to make Kirito win the fight against Kayaba. It is a concept that is even philosophical, inserted in the work through forshadowings, like Asuna exceeding the system's limit speed (some cut in the anime, unfortunately), and worked as a mystery under the hood until Alicization. A similar case that I like to mention is that of the King's Haki in One Piece, which is a feature introduced in a very similar way to Incarnation and that also only comes to be explained much later, which demonstrates a good preparation of the work. 2- Not all girls fall in love with him, and in fact, those who fall in love are in the minority. I don't blame you for thinking about Silica, Sinon, Tiese, or whoever you are as a romantic interest, but the truth is that they are not. And, well, the anime has some original scenes that reinforce this idea a little, and there is not a fan of the work that likes these scenes, but even analyzing in the exclusive context of the anime, they do not fall in love with Kirito. It's just a little forcing that the directors like to do to encourage shipps to sell more, which doesn't make them legitimately passionate. Only the ratio of female characters is higher than that of male characters, which is more similar to Steins; Gate than Zero in Tsukaima, for example.3- And here Gary Stu's classic argument ... I honestly don't have much bag to discuss this specific topic because for me it is already obvious that he is not a Gary Stu, but as I do not consider any discussion irrelevant, I think it is worth just connecting with what I said in the lines above. It is not because a character is "badass" or strong that he is necessarily a Gary Stu, and that alone brings us back to the previous debate about his development. Kirito would be a Gary Stu, if you ignored the whole journey, suffering and evolution throughout the work. It is like saying that Madoka is a Mary Sue, disregarding everything that happened to her to reach the point that reached the end of the TV series. An example of a Gary Stu character is that protagonist of Isekai wa Smartphone, which, as is clear from consuming both series, is totally different from how Kirito is approached. And now, finally, a paragraph about Kayaba. As I had already prepared the ground before, I believe that here things are simple to be addressed. I will quote Tenshi no Tamago here, a work that I had the pleasure of knowing recently, but, again, if you haven't watched it, I won't tell you spoilers. There is a scene in Tenshi no Tamago in which the girl (she has no name) asks the man (also without a name) who he is. Then the man asks the girl the same question. Now, analyzing it superficially, there is not much information in this text of the work. There are simply two questions. But the fact is, these two questions say much more than just "Who are you?" Here we have the same case. Kayaba's "I don't know" at the end of Aincrad carries much more than an "interestingly, he had forgotten". As I said, this is an analysis of extreme superficiality ... Unlike some questionable villains in the series, Kayaba is not a bad villain. In fact, he is a great villain and has not even had his closure as a character, since he is still approached and expanded in the arcs to this day. This text that I'm doing is not about Kayaba, so I won't go into it here much, but I just want you to rethink this topic, because "I don't know" means much more than it appears to mean in a superficial view, like himself Alicization justifies this by showing Kayaba flashbacks (and again, the work wants you to complete things, not explain everything to you expositively). So, as I said earlier, SAO has a lot of implicit, a lot of implied, and a lot of under the hood.
In fact, Progressive is not a retcon. There is a postscript by Kawahara in the first volume of Progressive where he comments on this. What happens is not exactly what you said there. You said that the original novel implied that they did not speak from the first floor and that this was even addressed by Agil in one of the first episodes of Aincrad, but in fact, we have some errors here, which I imagine were just problems of remembrance. Agil doesn’t imply that they haven’t spoken since the first floor, but rather comments that Kirito didn’t get along very well with Asuna (I’ll touch on that later). That said, the work does not imply that they did not speak well from the first floor, what it does imply is that they knew each other, but did not speak. And this is because the meeting against Kobold on the first floor is already Progressive material, that is, it was not in the original story. In other words, what the original story is to understand is that they did not speak much, but they had known each other for a while, and this is said by Kawahara himself in the afterword. The point of Progressive is not to be a retcon and to decanonize the original or to be an alternative universe. The point of Kawahara is that Progressive is canonical in the series as a whole, and this question of Kirito and Asuna is treated as an abyss narrative, and not as a retcon. As you may know, volume 1 of the novel is narrated by Kirito himself, almost like a diary, so there are texts where he comments that he and Asuna had never had dinner alone and things like that, but as I said, this is considered as a narrative in abyss (a story within a story) precisely because Kirito is the narrator. It is treated as a memory error. And in this, it is important to note that the anime worked very well. As much as I have my disagreements with episode 2, it alone demonstrates that Progressive is canonical, since it shows Kirito and Asuna meeting right on the first floor. Oh, and as for Agil's sentence, given that sentence and Asuna's introduction in the classic novel, it is presumably that there will eventually be a separation between them in the story of Progressive. I mean, the classic events are destined to happen, so Asuna will eventually join KoB and leave Kirito, thus giving rise to the "solo player" moments. Now, as this will be done just waiting to see, but I imagine it will end up being a fight, after all, so Agil's sentence would make total sense. So in summary, the changes that are made in Progressive are justified by narrative in abyss, and are not like a retcon that ignores the original.

--- Okay, this here I think was not very clear between us before we started the debate here. It was clear to me that you had already read the novel (I don't know to what extent), but that I thought Kirito was bad in both works, so much so that I had spoken badly about Kawahara, so connecting the dots, I imagined it. So, like this ... Since you said that, I imagine that we may end up reaching a point in common at some point, because, making my opinion clear, I see Kirito in the novel as an excellent character with all the lyrics, and the Kirito of the anime as a decent character, that no matter how much he has his problems, it is not all this evil that people comment. And, yes, the consensus of the fandom is precisely not only that volume 1 of the novel is better than the adaptation of the anime, but that the novel as a whole is much better than the anime. We make a point of defending the anime because normally either offenses are made against the original material based on the anime, or the criticisms made of it are bizarrely wrong, as you can see in this two-hour video defending the anime from SAO, where sometimes nor does it seem that the guy is answering a serious argument, as far from reality or as subject the guy's argument is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4RnPX1dhl8First, you consider Kawahara to be a lousy author exclusively because of the "narrative addiction" (I don't think intellectual limitation is a suitable term) that you put on the table? Because if you have no criticism of the novel's Kirito, I assume that you consider him a character at least well written, and so I imagine you think about the other characters that follow (Asuna, Suguha, Sinon, Alice, Eugeo ...). And here's a caveat: I already knew about this apology, and I know that it is quite common for Kawahara to always apologize for something. Until then in volume 2 of the classic novel he apologizes for all the main characters in the side stories being girls. The guy literally thought that people could misinterpret side stories, which they still do today (sdhgyarhuwsqeyurh) and apologized for that. And, yes, I agree that a narrative addiction is not a good thing, but note that Kawahara's own attitude in apologizing for this already demonstrates his concern with the work, and not a compulsive willingness to sell, as is the basis for several other light novels written today. Not to mention the own evolution that each scene of sexual harassment in the work. Each is better worked than the other. In the case of Fairy Dance, it is basically a simple plot device. In the case of the Phantom Bullet, it has the context of the villain's psychopathic passion behind it, which in itself is better than a simple plot device. In the case of Alicization, there is a whole previous context and several debates inserted there so that the whole scene was well worked and structured, that is, it is not even a problematic scene in any way, that I still have to praise the direction of Alicization anime in that scene. The guy sent particularly better than the old director with all the care he took with this scene, although he still did his classic shit leaving a funny face on the villains. In conclusion, what I want to demonstrate is that, unlike you, who said that I don't see any problems in these scenes, I see individual problems in them (except in Alicization), but not necessarily in repetition, because the improvement in the work in each one of the scenes is progressive. So, yes, the author evolves a lot throughout the volumes. I don't know what you mean by "subliminally" at this point, but that's definitely not what I mean kkkk. As you said, there are several (if that word is enough, lol) monologues, like the one you mentioned, or those where Kirito questions the motivations of the smiling coffin, and information, such as about Aincrad's newspaper, or the sex system within SAO, which are completely cut off in the anime and not even implied. I could continue to cite here others that I did not mention in the previous text, such as Aincrad's anti-harassment system, but I think that my opinion about the inferiority of the anime and the superiority of the novel has already become clear, and as you yourself agree with that, there's no reason for me to be reasserting myself. What I mean is that the xp division system specifically, of all the information in the novel, is in the anime. When it is approached I definitely do not remember it, but it is I am sure it is, even because this information already existed in my head before I even thought about reading the novel, there in my first watched anime, in 2012 ~ 2014. If you ask me, I can try to look for exactly where it happens, but I don’t know if I’m tired of doing a search now, after this whole week of researching Machiavelli and the fucking kkkkkk, then probably my next answer would take a little longer .

--- About Homura's paragraph, I just reaffirmed myself there because the arguments I used about bridges had already been mentioned in the first text or were discussed later, so there was no reason for me to repeat them there. And just reaffirming something else to make it clear here: of course I do not consider Kirito in the anime superior or in equal quality to Homura under any circumstances. I know that you probably understood this, but as this discussion is leaking a lot to other places, I think it's good to make it clear here so as not to get me wrong in any way.

--- I don't understand how you can think of me as proving your point in the paragraph about Moonlight Black Cats. You said that they should be the main characters of the arc in a paragraph where you visibly criticize Reki Kawahara, so I demonstrate my point by the structure of the novel, after all, you were criticizing the author.

(Change here): Just above, I said that I don't understand how you could think that I was proving your point, but I just realized why this confusion was caused. It turned out that I answered the part of the structure in my past text, but I forgot to answer the basis of your argument. I apologize for that. I decided to put this paragraph here instead of changing the first sentence of the previous one so as not to break the natural flow, because I didn't really remember to answer that point ...

Anyway, answering him ... You are analyzing things again in a very superficial way. It is not as if "A" justification is the incident with the Moonlight Black Cats, but the set of everything, so much so that in the first episode (before the incident), it is already very clear that Kirito is a lonely person. This starts to intensify because of the events in episode 3, so it's definitely not an "A" justification, as you were treating.

--- As for Klein, I think that the question of selfishness is precisely put to the test in a situation of life and death. In a world of extremely scarce resources like Aincrad, putting yourself in front of everyone, alone in that way is a selfish attitude. Of course, there is a justification behind this, after all, it is a life-and-death situation, but that is exactly what bothers Kirito and makes him grow: the fact that this attitude killed several people. Selfishness is not simply to stop lending something to someone or to stop helping someone.

Now for the comments on the episodes: 3º- As I said, he joined the guild even though he knew they wouldn’t accept him if they knew he was a player of the lines from the front or a beater. He only came in because he hid his level. Lonely people are happy when they have attention, and that's how Kirito felt, welcomed. The last sentence of the Moonlight Black Cats leader alone illustrates what I mean: "You were a beater ... You had no right to be with us!"
4th - Here we have a problem. I referred exclusively to the rescue of Silica, as I made clear in the last sentence. What he said was not a lie, he only took advantage of that to get closer to Silica after he discovered her connection with Rosalia. As for the journey to save Pina, the part you are referring to is very simple: as you said yourself, he was being paid and took the opportunity to help Silica on the "path", after all, he is a good person. His selfishness was not put to the test for helping Silica. And as for what he says when confronting Rosalia, I imagine you are referring to his moralism when asking if she imagined how the guild leader felt. The point is that this is not incoherent at all, look: what would a good and selfish person do?

A) It would help a bad cause for free

B) It would help a bad cause by getting paid for it

C) It would help a good cause for free

D) It would help a good cause by getting paid for it

Of course, the answer is the letter D ... Kirito, regardless of his selfishness, continues to see Rosalia as morally wrong, so I don't know where you want to go.5º- It is very clear that they have known each other for a long time even in the anime. As I said, it's not like someone is going to shit for a murder that took place in front of him, much less at the request of a close person. I mean, that was the fact that this murder is not just any PK, but a collective problem. Someone had allegedly been murdered in a safe area. Making a parallel, it is the same case of the blacksmith's bow on the second floor of Progressive. Such a problem could possibly harm Kirito too.8º- I expressed myself here using "classic novel" because you mentioned Progressive, but I meant "classic line", sorry for the misunderstanding. In anime, in the same way as in the novel, they already have involvement, as I already said at the beginning of the text.9º- It seems that here I ended up mixing anime with the novel. This conclusion that I presented is not exposed in the anime ... You can connect the ends and reach this conclusion, but it seems that this is not 100% clear there, at least not in the scenes that I took. I'm going to put an image showing what Kirito says, justifying the delivery of the information, but as I said, it seems that it really gets a little vague in the anime, so you can reach this conclusion of the novel or not. I don't think there is much to go on at this point anymore. I already said my opinion about the anime, so logically I agree that here the inferiority in relation to the novel is demonstrated.12º- Ah, yes, it is that you said that he tries to help the woman who took care of the orphanage, when in fact he will to her to seek help. You refer to the woman who knocks on the orphanage's door, but that helps. I need to make some considerations here. Notice that this is the scene where Kirito releases his famous phrase that says: "I prefer to help and regret it than not to help and regret it." Again, this does not conflict with what I said, since the problem falls on his lap, it is not as if he were distributing help around. And what would a high-level player with good intentions do in such a situation? Also note that, of all the attitudes already mentioned, this is the most "benevolent", since he is not gaining anything in return this time, which is interesting, because it is being taken right at the end of the Aincrad arc, that is, when he has already had considerable growth, and when he was already together with Asuna as a couple and with Yui as a daughter, which in itself already justifies a lot of things in his little heart.

--- About Eugeo, as I said myself: "There was no guarantee that he would be able to return to the human world." Of course, Kirito wanted to somehow contact Kikouka, but the journey was completely uncertain, the solid objective was to find Alice, that is, Eugeo's mission. And yes, Kirito had no memories of his past interaction with him, but note that it never stopped him from helping him. From the beginning with all the first four episodes to take down the cedar giga, until the journey in search of Alice itself.

--- What I want to point to with the question of promises is a consistency in the mistakes that Kirito has been making since the beginning, and how important this is for his shock at the end of the fight against Quinella and for his return in volume 18, not adapted yet. They are a personal craze for the character and have been there since the beginning of Aincrad, and they always have consequences, whether they are for him or for the people around him.

--- About PTSD, as I said, the question of Yui is extremely important here. I don't know if you understood my point, but from your conclusions, you can already get to it. Kirito's PTSD is not related to the fact that he was trapped in SAO, not least because, as I said in the part where I addressed the issue of Yui, his and Asuna's psychological state was different from the psychological state of the average SAO player. Kirito's PTSD is related to the problems he had with the smiling coffin, especially regarding that invasion of their base (which, just making a single comment, already has angry forshadowings for volume 18, not yet adapted), and for that reason, only comes to manifest itself later, in that tense scene of Phantom Bullet, where he meets the Death Gun. The consequence (PTSD) is related to the cause, which are the conflicts with the Smiling Coffin, and not the prison within Aincrad. That's why Yui is so important and that's why I keep saying that SAO plays a lot of things for you to conclude. The idea is that you link one information to another, and not give it all to you in an unnatural way, but it turns out that a lot of people just don't make the relationship.

--- About the changes from Web Novel to the official Light Novel, this is written in the afterword of Kawahara in volume 6 (end of the Phantom Bullet arc). I'll put a picture here. I don't know what you meant when you said you referred to Progressive. What I said had nothing to do with the relationship you made with Progressive, I just linked with what you said about the original line of Light Novel having been launched with small additions and said that it was not like that to reinforce the my point about the work being well prepared.
As for the concept of Incarnation, I did not effectively link the use of it in the first arc with the use in Alicization because that was not the intention of the text. I just gave you a quick answer to a quick statement you made. We can even change the theme of the debate to Incarnation, but I think that joining with the current theme will not work very well.

That said, if you want to see more in depth how this issue works, I highly recommend this video here, it works very well on this specific topic and explains this relationship well, except for the third type of Incarnation, which is present in Accel World, then no is very much the case here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iUPo275TI4

But, no, it is not a plot-hole, and yes, there are differences between what happens in Aincrad and what happens in Alicization, after all, as you said, one is at the cerebral level and the other is at the quantum level. I'm glad that at least you didn't mention Sachi, Silica, Yui (yes, I've heard that), or whoever it is. As for Suguha and Lisbeth, yes, they fell in love with Kirito!

That being that Suguha has a whole arc of her development focused on that, so I genuinely don’t know how anyone can view this or her as a problem, since the very conclusion of her development is based on overcoming that passion and starting to see and admire Kirito as he is for her, that is, as a brother.

Lisbeth does not have a development arc as Suguha has, but it is clear that the conclusion of her episode is completely related to Asuna and quite simple, by the way. Now, if she liked a boy, but later found out that a friend of hers was already with that boy, she has nothing to do but forget about it and respect their relationship, and that is exactly what she does. Her drama with Kirito has no continuity in the narrative simply because he is finished, although she has a crush on him, and that is the magic.

As for Sinon, this is basically a headcanon, so much so that the spin-off of the series itself irks this kkkkk.The topic about Gary Stu is already automatically discussed in the middle here, so it doesn't make much sense to isolate this discussion, so I supported myself on who had already spoken.

--- I didn't mean that Kayaba "forgot who he was" in any way. I quoted Tenshi in Tamago to demonstrate how significant an assertion or question that can seem to be so "empty" can be. His purpose in making a game of death is already clear from the first episode, as I will show in the images below. The fact that he "forgot" at the end of the arc is just an apparently "empty" assertion, but one that says many things. Kayaba wanted to play God. He had something like a God complex, or delusions of grandeur, if I may say so. That dialogue with Kirito and Asuna at the end of Aincrad demonstrates that there was a clear deconstruction of him throughout his childhood, when he dreamed of a castle floating in the skies, until he went through his developer phase, when he was on the NerveGear project. and SAO, and even SAO itself, when he fought alongside all those people who wanted with all their strength to get rid of that place (some did not, but Kayaba fought on the front lines, where most of all that was the desire populacer). Do you see how it is meticulously worked? That's because it's not even closed yet. Unital Ring, the last arch, apparently will come with everything just to close this long arch of Kayaba, which has been worked little by little since the beginning of the work. Now yes, finishing the text. I want to apologize for the delay, since I had said that by the weekend, I probably would have managed to finish, but I ended up taking a little longer than that kk LLJ


ToTTheGreaT | May 31, 9:38 AM


Scoye | May 31, 9:32 AM
Deus.


Valenzy_is_Real | May 28, 10:35 PM
Sword Art Online and Accel World! What a masterpiece game genre of anime!!


LilJerry | May 26, 12:56 PM
Cringe. Tanjigod is much more better 😡


Yellow_x_Flash | May 21, 5:06 AM
Sword art online is a masterpiece


Michy21 | May 4, 5:10 AM
você é um canalha


a_day_dreaming | Apr 26, 7:17 AM
rape art online


DKalen | Apr 9, 1:58 AM
@Capgyro did an amazing analysis. And thanks to @ProxyLain for translating it.


Borealico | Apr 2, 5:20 PM
wtf is wrong with the dude behind me


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