Reviews

Jul 31, 2009
kurodayuchi (All reviews)
Have you ever wished you could fly away and leave your mediocre life and sad past behind you?

A girl can flutter around embraced by nature, comprehending animal and plant languages, and blasting away her insecurities with a gush of wind. She has always been searching for a nest, but the emptiness of not having a place to come back to is filled with the feeling of liberty.

It is impressive how a one shot manhwa which got third place in an amateur contest is far keener than some highly regarded manga with thousands of pages. This statement would seem false if you let prejudice dominate the first impression of simplicity that the drawings and the infantile features appear to imply. However, it’s because of this same childlike development that this work manages to find profoundness.

Lewis Carroll’s Alice is considered by a lot of people a childish story – mainly because of Disney. But it is in fact a fountain of inspiration for many artists, from poets to CLAMP, once it carries on its outward appearance of nonsense to an extreme creativity and even a political vein. The same can be applied to some extent here.

It cannot be said that the art is great. It’s the plain art style of a beginner’s work but, since the story has an initially mild attribute, it fits the plot pretty well: complex artwork would not match the purpose of this narrative. You can feel like you are being transported to those times when you read or heard from your parents a story that you knew could not be truthful but you accepted it with enjoyment. And in the allegedly inconsequential nature of it all, you could find some things to think about it.

The main human character is a girl that searches for her place in a panoramic view. Although there are other characters that, if not human in form, hold a human heart: a bird that protects its children, its future, and a tree that lost its friend in the flux of time and now is completely alone in this cold winter are the company this girl keeps in her free world.

Yet given all these misleading simplicities, complexity is going to barge into this unpretentiousness like the wind that carries this girl away as the end approaches. This is not something that is going to take a lot of time for you to read, but it’s something that is going to take you a lot of time to reflect upon.