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Nov 15, 2017
Washio Sumi's Chapter is a prologue to Yuki Yuna is a Hero that serves as both a redefining experience and as a unique universe addition. Its goal was to sit somewhere been essential world-building and narrative, or simply being an extra story to flesh out the main series.

I say this because there's 2 ways to experience the Washio story. Released originally as a light novel, chapters were coming in between episodes and thus were made in such a way as to not spoil the original series and should probably be watched (or read) alongside the original series... to a certain extent. If you haven't already read more
Jun 22, 2017
Simoun (Anime) add (All reviews)
It's been 3 years since I last watched Simoun. I remember it being exceptional, and I've considered it my favourite since not long after watching it. But as I went through my rewatch, I was ready to nitpick and find as many flaws as I could. I now realise that there are few shows that even come close to Simoun's level of quality throughout, either as a character-drama, a war-drama, a sci-fi or the subtle social commentary peppered throughout.

Ah yes, I suppose I should mention that Simoun plants itself heavily within the war-drama category, with a heavy emphasis on its characters and set in a read more
May 23, 2017
Analysing a piece of fiction often begins with understanding the author's intentions; specifically, why this piece of work was made. Sometimes this is easy and can be done from the synopsis - for example, Shawshank Redemption is an example of the injustices of the American social system in terms of justice and rehabilitation. Others, it is not so easy, such as is the case for Mawaru Penguindrum or this anime, Himegoto.

Being an anime about a crossdressing girl with heaps of up-skirt dick-shots and short episode runtimes, you roll your eyes and presume the basest of intentions: fetish. You would expect a demographic of trap-fans, right? read more
May 23, 2017
It's a curious thing, being the 2nd in a trilogy. Too often they get overshadowed as the "middle" chapter, sandwiched between a grand opening and a grand finale with only exposition as its purpose (Lord of the Rings), but sometimes the journey, the character shaping movements and setup for the finale are the strongest elements (Empire Strikes Back). Washio Sumi's 2nd chapter, Spirit, is already leaning toward the latter.

Following the friendship cemented at the end of the first movie, the second movie delves deeper into those bonds. Amusingly, it uses an omake-styled skit setting for the opening half's slice-of-life, giving us a fast-paced omnibus of read more
May 22, 2017
Blame!, with its grey ceilings, pillars and story, firmly plants itself within the cyberpunk genre. It even has leather-clad, sexy cyborgs to boot. It looks and feels like The Matrix when the characters aren't in fact in the Matrix. It's an apt anecdote because it's got as much point as that: a franchise missing its hook.

Blame! looks the part, certainly. In fact, it looks and sounds brilliant. Based in a desolate, underground city, it will never look as interesting as Ghost in the Shell's New Port City or the orange hue of Deus Ex. But the mixture of post-apocalyptic dystopia and cyberpunk dystopia come together, read more
Mar 2, 2017
With awkward silence of Shirou’s inability to comprehend the words of others does the Nausverse return to our screens. Welcome back to the continuation of the story we shrugged off the harrowing inconsistencies to, with gritted teeth murmuring “at least the action is good.”

This time the story opens with that continued intrigue of Archer, of his hidden ideals and subtle character development, and the subplot of Caster’s backstory is fleshed out nicely. Unfortunately, the pitiful romance between Rin and Shirou is returning, with her tsundere tricks all coming to play while Shirou continues to be the biggest idiot on screen. On the bright side, at read more
Feb 26, 2017
Unlimited Blade Works faces the awkward fact of being made in the wake of Fate/Zero, a tightly told, mature story with great action. It mainly differs in that, instead of constant planning, there is a slice-of-life-school storyline, but more than that…

The biggest difference is without a doubt the biggest blow.

Shirou.

We follow around a single protagonist, a weak novice mage who accidentally gets puled into the Grail Wars. It’s a fairly typical start for a show with a complex world, allowing lots of explanations for both the viewer and the characters without reducing them to idiots. Unfortunately, this bozo is an idiot anyway.

It’s through him that read more
Dec 28, 2016
Kannazuki No Miko is one of those anime that's so powerful it demands an opinion. When it gnaws at its budget and the impressive writing, it is a truly outstanding anime. But it throws so much into the mixture that it's often hard to focus on these moments of wonder.

At it's heart is a slice-of-life romance; a love triangle that you'll remember forever. Even the show's detractors cannot take away the power of this show's beating, complex heart.

Chikane Himemiya, the grace of Otoachibana academy, the perfection of the town Mahoroba and only daughter to its ruling family, underpins this show with a demeanour few anime read more
Dec 23, 2016
Keijo!!!!!!!!, with all 8 exclamation marks being absolutely necessary, is an outrageous show about swimsuit-clad women fighting each other with their butts and boobs in a kind of sumo-wrestling parody. Sounds outrageous, right?

The most outrageous thing about Keijo!!!!!!!! is how touching it can be.

Make no mistake, Keijo is bonkers. But instead of simply filling the screen with butts doing battle, a lot of work has been put into the little things. We follow Nozomi, a somewhat typical protagonist, that is, a ridiculously arrogant yet free-spirited soul, as she attends Setouji Keijo Training School, an academy specifically for Keijo. However, what I was not expecting at read more
Dec 21, 2016
Preliminary
You've got be in a certain time at a certain place to appreciate Cowboy Bepop. It's sense of cultural mismatch doesn't excuse it's lack of identity. It pushes style over substance because there is no substance. It's constant homage to everything and anything muddies whatever originality it has.

But at the same time, cowboys in space sounds cool right? Freeform jazz is cool too. Martial arts are cool. Are these the reasons the anime became so famous? Or is it because the 90s meant it had to be viewed on television at whatever time the channels chose to air Japanese cartoons, meaning that the sense of read more