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Jun 30, 2015
Kyoto Animation has relationship with the viewer that I find to often be a complicated waltz between fame and infamy. Being so renowned, the line between these two traits is very thin, and often it is easier for the studio to be criticized rather than applauded; it is a much more popular option to join in on a cynical crowd mentality rather than to accept an achievement for what it is--and I believe Hibike! Euphonium is one of Kyoto Animation's achievements, a wonderful comeback from material that pushes the studio over to the infamous side of the line.

Because of the cynicism that often surrounds the read more
Jun 28, 2015
Often times, anime becomes an effective outlet for limitless fictional worlds, ones that reach out far beyond the norm to accurately portray the original vision of the worlds' creators. Often times, these worlds suffer from being too complicated, too busy and too cluttered with the many ideas that have no place in a twelve or thirteen episode run. Often times, these twelve or thirteen episodes are the cause to many, many headaches of mine.
And yet, Plastic Memories has me missing those headaches, the ones spawned from such an expansive world, because this is something Plastic Memories has failed to explore.

While the anime provides an interesting read more
Mar 29, 2015
Shounen is a tricky genre. Too often, plot is abandoned for the sake of showcasing all of the powers and techniques of the hero, and knowing this, I was very reluctant to get into Nanatsu no Taizai. Having taken the plunge several weeks after the show's original premier, I am incredibly pleased with what I ended up with.

Nanatsu no Taizai does follow the same basic shounen formula: one powerful force butts heads against another, everyone is naming their attacks before they use them, a useless female companion appears--yet, these rough edges are given their time to develop into something likable and actually compelling to watch.

The read more
Mar 23, 2015
I suppose I am a terrible believer in the idea that, more often than not, a show will get better over time. Whether or not this is true is subjective based on personal values. In the case of Absolute Duo, the idea is untrue, and painful to uphold.
As an anime, Absolute Duo moved through each episode like a dough ball rolling down an gravelly hill, gradually deteriorating in something that seemed a bit like fanservice wrapped up in cheap Soul Eater cosplay. From title credits and summaries alone, all's fine, but once the thin facade is peeled back, Absolute Duo is an action anime turned read more
Mar 22, 2015
It is a long journey to find out exactly what 'Your Lie in April' is, but it is one of delicacy, growth, and love, and from start to finish it was incredible.

The story follows the days of Kousei, his relationship with his friends, his music, his mother and, as the case often is, with the girl he loves. However, the anime does not hesitate to expand on each point, and the love for the work put into the show is evident.

There are two main arcs to the anime, one easily transitioning into the other at the mid-season mark. In the first, there is the classic read more
Dec 28, 2014
When a giant saucer appears in the sky above a small town, what sort of events would you expect to follow?
Sora no Method poses this question, and then follows with the most mundane answer it could have gone with: a slice of life drama that spends about five minutes of the whole series actually talking about the saucer, despite it being the source of many troubles the characters face. The fact that someone thought it would be a good idea to through in such a large supernatural element and then treat it like it was nothing worth acknowledge subsequently succeeded in creating a very read more
Dec 25, 2014
Yuuki Yuuna wa Yuusha de Aru was another member of the new-age magical girl genre--a collective of teen girls with your basic set of personalities (smart one, shy one, large breasted one, etc.) receive superhuman powers and moe outfits to fight some villain, the new age aspect being that there is some horrible catch to it.
Unfortunately, since Madoka Magica, it has become a nightmare to build hype for any new shows falling into these guidelines. Understandably, it is very hard to compete with a show that got not only its twelve episodes, but its drama CDs and several movies. Yuuki Yuuna just seems something of read more
Dec 21, 2014
Gugure! Kokkuri-san follows the episodic adventures of various Japanese supernatural creatures and Kohina, a self-proclaimed 'doll'. As the events are disjointed scenarios from episode to episode, the show relies wholly on it's comedy to gain viewship--however, this comedy is not at all top notch for being the one savior of the program.

None of the different endeavors of the characters from episode to episode are new, or presented in a refreshing way. A girl summons a ghost because she is lonely, and said ghost becomes her substitute mom, as, for some reason, those in charge of Gugure! felt the need to throw in angst in an read more
Dec 18, 2014
With a selling point of fun, yet simple characters and bright colors, Denki-Gai no Honya-san provides a solid representation of comedy for the fall anime season.
Additionally, with Denki-Gai, I believe what you see is a good summary of what you get.

As with many slice of life anime, Denki-Gai is episodic in nature, with some continuing romantic plot to keep the story going. It is almost nostalgic to watch, as the different weekly goings-on in the show are reminiscent of various cartoons one might watch, though of course with a lot more seinen added in.
Most of these episodes are a bit cliche in nature, which read more
Sep 29, 2014
Barakamon was the end to my summer anime endeavors and I was incredibly pleased with the amount of life, heart and value I found in its story. The entire atmosphere of the show was such a homely, comforting experience, one that so enjoyable and I expect to continue to be so should I ever decide to give it another run through.

The story is that of the impulsive calligrapher Handa Seishuu, referred to as Sensei throughout the series, and his journey of finding himself in his work--a wonderful balance is created between this end of the plot and the comedic situations encountered, those of which keep read more