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Sep 7, 2016
Hmm, how can I say this?

I am disappointed.

Tsubakikan almost has what it takes to be a decent, if not good, manga. The premise is interesting and the plot is, well, it’s a shoujo manga so there’s not much to innovate, but that’s part of the charm, though I think it went a bit too fast in the last few chapters. The characters, however, were a disappointment.
Take Yufuin, for example. From the very beginning we learn he can’t look into girls’ eyes or he’ll faint, and we learn it’s because of a girl-related trauma he had during college, but other than some flashbacks (which seemed read more
Jul 21, 2016
Preliminary
(this review is provisory and likely to be changed when more chapters become available)

This is really good. Since it's josei, it's got that warm, pinkish, power of love kinda thing, but the disability part isn't watered down at all* and is presented rather realistically. Right from the get-go the male lead is very upfront about what daily life in a wheelchair is like, especially the parts healthy people don't really think about, or try not to (like defecating), and the reality of his situation hits us earlier than I expected. I thought a josei manga would only approach the medical complications derived from chronic immobility read more
Jun 13, 2016
Preliminary
Review after the first 13 chapters:

Wow, where can I begin? A group of five children decides to raise an alien baby that fell from the sky and has a superpower. The story could be really sweet if it took the usual shoujo route. But what I didn't expect, especially considering the mangaka's other works, was such a thrilling story that makes my heart rate go up.

In the beginning we're presented to a group of five seemingly average children who take up baby Bara and raise her together, taking turns in keeping her in their house. This is where the good part starts: not only do read more
Jun 12, 2016
Preliminary
Review of the first volume:

Despite having two anime and manga adaptations, I feel like Arslan Senki is closer to classic high fantasy novels than your run-of-the-mill light novel.

Arslan Senki is set in a parallel world loosely based in pre-Islamic Persia so it falls into the realm of historical fantasy. Actually, the author himself states that he was heavily influenced both by classic novels and epics and historical events. It tells the story of Arslan, crown prince of Pars, a country that was taken over by the neighbouring Lusitania after his father was betrayed by one of his retainers, and his quest to recover his country read more