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Kaze no Tani no Nausicaä

Kaze no Tani no Nausicaä

Alternative Titles

English: Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind
Synonyms: Kaze no Tani no Nausicaa
Japanese: 風の谷のナウシカ

Information

Type: Manga
Volumes: 7
Chapters: 59
Status: Finished
Published: Oct 9, 1982 to Feb 10, 1994
Authors: Miyazaki, Hayao (Story & Art)
Serialization: Animage

Statistics

Score: 8.901 (scored by 9593 users)
1 indicates a weighted score. Please note that 'Not yet published' titles are excluded.
Ranked: #142
2 based on the top manga page. Please note that 'R18+' titles are excluded.
Popularity: #234
Members: 30,290
Favorites: 2,417

Recommendations

After the apocalypse there are still oppresors, refugees, greed and life-missions that will make Killy (BLAME!) and Nausicaä (duh) experience countless of battles in worlds beyond our imagination. Blame! is more action-oriented and defenetly more nihilist while Nausicaä more idealistic and misantrophic 
reportRecommended by UnoPuntoCinco
I know, it may not seem similar but again looks may be deceiving. On a surface level, Akira and Nausicaa were the two momumental animes and mangas of the 1980's with their historical importence almost eclipsed only by the rise of Gegika, Osamu Tezuka, and Neon Genesis Evangelion. On the story, both are layed with socialogical and political themes imbedded into the story. The themes are different, but that really doesn't matter sense since mangas with social commentary are few and far between. The scale of both of them are epic with headscratching ending that are surprisingly dense and the culmination of all of the  read more 
reportRecommended by Pierre_Bezukhov
The world is ending, facing its imminent demise in the form of a major natural disaster caused by the wrongdoings of humanity. Meanwhile, a considerable amount of characters struggle to survive, understand and restore the world before the imminent Apocalypse takes place, all the while crossing their paths and reflecting about the meaning of life and the faults of human beings, with not-so-subtle religious and philosophical themes and the bellic setting enriching the stories. 
reportRecommended by Valefor
Both Nausicaa and Children of the Sea deal with concurrent themes of nature and environmental awareness, though Nausicaa focuses on a much larger scale and can be interpreted as more of an epic story or fantasy. Whereas Children of the Sea is somewhat more laden and, simultaneously, subtle with its metaphysical themes. 
reportRecommended by Inactiv3
Even if they belong to different genres, Nausicaä is centered around action (Hayao Miyazaki style mind you), and YKK is a slice of life meditation, they both share the same post apocalyptic theme about how to deal with the humanities dark sides. Both are incredible masterpieces that I can not recommend enough.  
reportRecommended by txrxgxu
-They both have breathtakingly beautiful artwork, with incredibly detailed backgrounds, very well thought out settings and gorgeous character designs. -They both have elements of fantasy. -They both have strong stories that revolve around a young female protagonist. 
reportRecommended by alpha_shadow
While nausicaä is an epic adventure and ai-ren is a "mono no aware" meditation, they are both exploring the existentialistic questions about the nature of humanity. Both are masterpieces. 
reportRecommended by txrxgxu
If you're a fan of Studio Ghibly you should definitely check out Kuro, it's a real gem, and the art and storytelling is straight out from something like Spirited Away or Princess Mononoke. its even in color! 
reportRecommended by txrxgxu
Yoshitomi Akihito has really put his philosophical vein into this work, and the reoccurring theme of ancient civilizations and the sole witness who can not die reminds a lot of the themes of Nausicaa.  
reportRecommended by txrxgxu
Both of them have incredibly imaginative settings, with stunning artwork that can be endlessly creative. Both of them have a vast amount of fantastical creatures (animals, bugs, plants, etc.) Both of them have main characters that undergo a lot of development on their adventure and deal with a lot of hardships.  
reportRecommended by alpha_shadow
These titles have some similar characters, Edward and Nausiccä, they both are good and gentle persons that valorize all the life forms, even the dangerous, weak or artificial ones, but they found themselves in war/military situations and suddenly have to save the world (only the country in the case of FMA), so they pass for similar internal conflicts. Also Kushana and Olivier Armstrong have similarity in personality and in their relationships with their soldiers. Although these are only minor similarities, the major connection is the philosophy of these titles, both talk about the balance of nature (both even have the phrase “one is all, all  read more 
reportRecommended by vssvitor
while Omoide Emanon doesnt share many similarities to Nausicaa in terms of plot, i find Emanon and Nausicaa to be similar as characters. both Emanon and Nausicaa have a sort of connection with the planet in which they inhabit. Nausicaa has her intuition that seems to be almost like telepathy between her and the state of the world, and Emanon has a first hand photographic memory that goes all the way back to when life first appeared on earth. aside from the MC's the art style is rather similar. the moment i first picked this up Kenji's style reminded me alot of Miyazaki. Emanon also has  read more 
reportRecommended by uboofs
The most important aspect of Nausicaa and Lindbergh is humanity's treatment of fantasy creatures: giant insects called "ohmu" and wingless dragons called "lindbergh," respectively. They often get abused and treated as tools of war. When humans mess with them the wrong way, they can become quite monstrous and violent. Both manga have flying ships, aerial combat, ancient legends, and an aristocratic female antagonist. The main protagonists, Nausicaa and Knit, travel with a cute animal companion that protects them along their journey. 
reportRecommended by Mimi_Taylor
For those who've only seen the movie of Nausicaa may question this reccomendation. however the manga is completely different from the anime. Both Berserk and Nausicaa are bloody, there's a lot of wars, fighting and action. also a lot of wierd and interesting shit happens. with berserk its demons and monsters, in nausicaa its monsters, giant bugs that have a great link to the earth and immortal kings that breed unhuman warriors. Most importantly they both have a very, very great plot and storyline. 
reportRecommended by DarkRoseOtaku
Both have environmental themes. 
reportRecommended by momoko-rose
As stated in the description of Sabaku, it is something of a prototype to Nausicaä, featuring locations, factions, character designs, and even plot points that are later used in Nausicaä and much more fleshed out and developed. Both works are tied together by the central theme of 'the tragedy of war', and are great reads for fans of Miyazaki. 
reportRecommended by masamvne
Both are fantasy storys about a world buit on the ruins of a ancient civilization destroyed by the ambitious of mankind. This past world keeps many secrets which can change the story of the world. 
reportRecommended by Shaya
When reading Basara it really reminded me of Nausicaa at many moments. Both mangas have an epic feel and really tough heroines. Both are daughters of their villages' chiefs and have an important 'destiny' that involves healing the world after a lot of destruction. Both characters have a cute pet that follows them around. They also are both very charismatic, easily becoming friends with almost everyone. Basara hints at environmental concerns, while Nausicaa makes it one of the main topics of the story. Sarasa is more inclined to fighting that Nausicaa is. Both stories have very emotional moments and a large cast of complex characters. Basara  read more 
reportRecommended by athenacat
If you enjoying seeing post-apocalyptic wastelands in style reminiscent of Moebius, take a look at No. 5. The stories and characters a very different and No. 5 prefers deserts, surrealism and action to flying and the jungle. 
reportRecommended by Chaostrooper