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Poll: Kaze Tachinu Episode 1 Discussion


May 27, 2014 10:07 AM
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I believe this is a film that Hayao Miyazaki wanted and felt had to be made for the Japanese audience. Whether will it will be liked by the audience in Japan or worldwide was secondary issue to him while he was making it.

Without knowing the social-cultural contexts of the production of this film, it's a bit hard to understand the strong message (it's pretty obvious for the Japanese, but somehow it was misunderstood elsewhere). The Great Eastern Japan Earthquake of 2011 shook Japan entirely with uncertainty with over 18,500 people dead or missing and 400,000 homes destroyed; at one point there was serious risk that 40 million residents in the Kanto Region including Tokyo had to evacuate because of the defunct nuclear power plant. Then, there was ongoing conflict at sea with China over the small islands, which fueled the increasing popularity of the rightist nationalist wing in politics among the younger generation of Japan, amid fears that war is inevitable in the future, sometime soon.

The wind was rising. And it was not a gentle breeze; it was a strong wind of turmoil which had very striking dark similarities to pre-war Japan. The Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 produced fear among Japanese people that ethnic Koreans and Chinese were plotting a revolt and releasing poison in the wells- which was exploited by right-wingers and led to a massacre of hundreds of innocent people. Also, the uncertainty created by Great Depression in 1929 also fueled the rightists and eventually the feeble democracy was overwhelmed by the military which drove Japan into expansionism, endless war with China, and subsequent defeat in the Asia-Pacific War.

Kaze Tachinu (The Wind Rises) is not a story about ordinary heroism. The Japanese know too vividly from recent memory that at the period of crisis a simple superhero cannot solve the situation; a Batman or two cannot solve real issues like severe natural disasters and looming war. The issue is too big and serious and complex for that; at time of crisis an all-promising hero is usually the villain. As in the film and reality, preachers preach nonsense with authoritative voice. But then what can normal people do? Be happy and join the mob? Or stand back in complete apathy, like some in the very young generation of the Japanese? Or kill oneself in despair, like some people chose to do after they lost hope after the Earthquake?

Jiro in Kaze Tachinu lives on positively by doing what he is best at doing. It's his lifework to make planes; he does not stop it although he knows Naoko is dying. Naoko knows that life is short and instead of being kept alive in hospital at vegetative level tries to live and burn out for her love, supporting Jiro.

The wind rises. We must live.

Kaze Tachinu is a strong ode for human dignity, with direct messages to the Japanese audience at the time of crisis, ongoing peril, helplessness, and apathy. It is also an allegory that sends off alarms (after all Jiro made the best planes that never came back). Whether it would be appreciated sympathetically in Japan or worldwide was least of Miyazaki's concern when he made this film. He had to make it as an aging son of a factory manager supplying materials for warplanes during WW2. It's meant to be his last will and testament (although I do hope he'll change his mind and make more films).

Overall, this isn't my most favorite film of Miyazaki, but some scenes are very beautiful and poetic (like the marriage and first night) that I can never slate this as score: 6/10 or call it underwhelming. I thought it was a masterpiece while seeing at the theater and I still think it is.
Modified by GohanwaOkazu, May 30, 2014 1:24 PM
 
Jun 6, 2014 5:07 PM

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A very good movie. 9/10
 
Jun 19, 2014 7:10 AM

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Bitch come and go as she please

Umm, it's Ok I guess..
But not as good as I thought it would be..
Modified by Toaki90, Jun 19, 2014 7:14 AM
"Burn the heretics"
 
Jun 19, 2014 10:24 AM

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Torn apart between a 8 or a 9.
I initially thought there was a lack of action or a climax. This did change at the end though.
The ending was sad but it was also filled with hope even after Japan had lost the war.
Naoko's struggles to be with Jiro and the times they shared. Along with Jiro's struggle to achieve his dream and getting back up from his failures. These themes were done actually pretty well.

Going to give this a 9 after thinking about it a bit more. Those 3 letters and watching Jiro's fighters fly in the sky... it was quite the beautiful scene to watch.
 
Jun 20, 2014 2:48 PM

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I would probably give this a 9/10 but I REALLY don't get some reviews on MAL that rated it 5/10 etc
 
Jun 21, 2014 7:28 AM
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Mechanically this film falls short.

However, as a piece of art, Kaze Tachinu is as good as it gets.
 
Jun 21, 2014 10:23 AM
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Did her wife died from the bombing or did she ditch her husband?
 
Jun 21, 2014 12:13 PM

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I watched it dubbed and it wasn't very well done, otherwise I enjoyed it, a little boring at times, though. 8/10.
 
Jun 21, 2014 1:05 PM

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Again a wonderful masterpiece from the Hayao Miyazaki!



Le vent se lève, il faut tenter de vivre.
 
Jun 21, 2014 6:29 PM

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So he created the planes used in WWII. Too bad it lead to Grave of the Firefiles.

Teared when Nahako died T___T. Love this movie!!
 
Jun 22, 2014 3:27 AM

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Very nice movie. I wasn't too thrilled with Anno's performance at first, he's not much of an actor, but I got used to it.
I shed a tear at the end. Miyazaki himself also cried in the end of this movie, so I guess that's legit..
 
Jun 22, 2014 9:12 AM

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Personally I liked it. I'm fond of old days settings, and i like some romance too. Although I kinda wish they focused a tiny bit more on the romance part, not that the romance genre should be the bigger picture in the movie, but if just felt slightly lacking at parts.



wadafakbbq said:
Did her wife died from the bombing or did she ditch her husband?

She didn't ditch him, she decided to go the hospital like place. She died from her illness, not from bombing.
Modified by Tyrel, Jun 23, 2014 11:54 PM
 
Jun 23, 2014 3:05 AM

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Such a wonderful and beautiful movie. The scenery was amazing throughout the whole movie. Jirou and Naoko are great lovable characters.
So sad that Naoko was dying but they still got married and were able to spend as much time as possible being with each other.
Loved the song at the end.

Jirou designed an awesome plane and just loved his journey.
"I’ve set myself to become the King of the Pirates…and if I die trying…then at least I tried!" Monkey D. Luffy (One Piece)

 
Jun 23, 2014 5:51 AM

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I was a little upset that Naoko lost her French accent.. And we never actually saw her die... But that's preferences... This was a Fantastic conclusion to Miyazakis career.. Also ghibli films have such amazing dubs... JGL as jirou was genius.
 
Jun 23, 2014 2:42 PM

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Wow Miyazaki trolled us pretty hard, this movie was just terrible
If some of you fanboys ask why, check out my review about it:
http://myanimelist.net/profile/Lockensocke/reviews




One thing i have to mention here since its probably considered a spoiler:
Did the main character really said " i loved you since you caught my hat" to his wife.. Dude she was like 10 years old back then...
Modified by Lockensocke, Jun 24, 2014 12:07 AM
 
Jun 23, 2014 5:30 PM

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Lockensocke said:
Wow Miyazaki trolled us pretty hard, this movie was just terrible
If some of you fanboys ask why, check out my review about it:
http://myanimelist.net/profile/Lockensocke/reviews


You do realize that it was a "fictionalized biography" don't you? Meaning your complaints about a "lack of plot and goal" are just plain wrong. That's like complaining that someones life didn't have a plot.....

I genuinely lol'd at your "plot hole" of them speaking 2 words of English. They spoke more words of French, Italian and German....were those plot holes as well?
 
Jun 24, 2014 12:08 AM
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A really nice movie, but I felt like the dub was lackluster. Though I still enjoyed listening to the dub as I rather be listening than reading the subs. I felt like some stuff was left out in the open. Why were the secret police looking for him? Was that part just for show? Despite that, I found the show somewhat boring, somewhat relaxing and interesting to watch. I can see why people will find this boring because nothing much happens—but I still enjoyed it.

8/10 for me.
Modified by Tyrel, Dec 16, 2014 4:01 AM
 
Jun 24, 2014 9:34 AM

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SimmianPrime said:
Lockensocke said:
Wow Miyazaki trolled us pretty hard, this movie was just terrible
If some of you fanboys ask why, check out my review about it:
http://myanimelist.net/profile/Lockensocke/reviews


You do realize that it was a "fictionalized biography" don't you? Meaning your complaints about a "lack of plot and goal" are just plain wrong. That's like complaining that someones life didn't have a plot.....

I genuinely lol'd at your "plot hole" of them speaking 2 words of English. They spoke more words of French, Italian and German....were those plot holes as well?


Hey arnt you that guy from the Lotgh forums? Well i like to debunk all of you fanboys with their shallow opinion, but i really have to ask myself what you try to acchieve here. Shouldnt you know that such pseudo logic on your arguments dont work on me? Anyways:

“Fictionalized biography” and “life didn’t have a plot”…. I hope you notice how much you contradict yourself with your arguments. Like I said in my review.. I don’t know what this movie is, does it play in the real world or in some imagination land, and neither do you since the movie doesn’t tell you. If Miyazaki said so that’s fine for him, but it doesn’t matter as long as he doesn’t includes his opinion in the movie he created.

Every form of story has a goal, something the audience looks up to, which is the reason they continue watching it. In a biography you can make certain goals, such as fulfillment of that persons dream or just his life until he dies. The goal has to be established as soon as possible, because it decides the type of audience you have along with many other factors. In the movie “kaze Tachinu” the goal that was established, even though it was very unclear was the fulfillment of his dream, which means the building of his plane. But since the show focuses not around this goal and only let it reappear at the end as a short ending, the story has no set goal. Sure you can subjectively find your own goal in this anime, but that’s like I said, subjective only.

And there is no story without goal since its per definition included. If you have an anime without a goal it’s either a plane chain of events or pure abstract, in either way no continuing story. Maybe each screen segment can be defined as own storyline but it has no connection then.

And just a one question I have to ask: why would you make a movie about a normal person which just makes his daily work until he dies, without goal or plot? And why would you like or watch or even defend that? And I even said in my review: “this movie is for people who hate Miyazaki movies”, because in every movie there was something special, a goal to achieve. This movie is just flat and boring.

About the “plot hole”: if you can read you will notice the word “minor” in front of “Plot hole” and I said “often saying some one liners” which means there are more than 2 words spoken in English. It’s a difference when an adult, maybe a businessman who traveled a lot caught up some words around the world or someone says the favorite quote of a book in a foreign language than using English words in your daily chat with random people. This type of language most likely came into existence after Japan lost the Second World War and became more and more Americanized. Before that I would rather expect Japanese to have a rather negative attitude against foreign people and especially against Americans. When you look at history in the 19 century so a bit before the First World War Japan has been isolated for around 200 years from every other country, so around the Second World War I would guess that a bit of a dislike against every other country would still berecognizable, since this attitude should still be in the people. And after Japan has been opend to international trading Britians and Americans has treated them like every other backward Asian country, which mostly pissed them off.

As usual you fanboys are first trying to defend their shit before you actually think about what I said. What is wrong with you that you don’t hold back even if you embarrass yourself because you clearly show how little you know about the stuff you talk about? Inform yourself at least a little bit about Japans history or its culture before talking about historical anime. I would recommend doing it anyways, because you probably will get a different view over anime as a medium.
Modified by Lockensocke, Jun 24, 2014 11:18 AM
 
Jun 24, 2014 5:04 PM

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Lockensocke said:
[spoiler] Hey arnt you that guy from the Lotgh forums? Well i like to debunk all of you fanboys with their shallow opinion, but i really have to ask myself what you try to acchieve here. Shouldnt you know that such pseudo logic on your arguments dont work on me? Anyways:

“Fictionalized biography” and “life didn’t have a plot”…. I hope you notice how much you contradict yourself with your arguments. Like I said in my review.. I don’t know what this movie is, does it play in the real world or in some imagination land, and neither do you since the movie doesn’t tell you. If Miyazaki said so that’s fine for him, but it doesn’t matter as long as he doesn’t includes his opinion in the movie he created.

Every form of story has a goal, something the audience looks up to, which is the reason they continue watching it. In a biography you can make certain goals, such as fulfillment of that persons dream or just his life until he dies. The goal has to be established as soon as possible, because it decides the type of audience you have along with many other factors. In the movie “kaze Tachinu” the goal that was established, even though it was very unclear was the fulfillment of his dream, which means the building of his plane. But since the show focuses not around this goal and only let it reappear at the end as a short ending, the story has no set goal. Sure you can subjectively find your own goal in this anime, but that’s like I said, subjective only.

And there is no story without goal since its per definition included. If you have an anime without a goal it’s either a plane chain of events or pure abstract, in either way no continuing story. Maybe each screen segment can be defined as own storyline but it has no connection then.

And just a one question I have to ask: why would you make a movie about a normal person which just makes his daily work until he dies, without goal or plot? And why would you like or watch or even defend that? And I even said in my review: “this movie is for people who hate Miyazaki movies”, because in every movie there was something special, a goal to achieve. This movie is just flat and boring.

About the “plot hole”: if you can read you will notice the word “minor” in front of “Plot hole” and I said “often saying some one liners” which means there are more than 2 words spoken in English. It’s a difference when an adult, maybe a businessman who traveled a lot caught up some words around the world or someone says the favorite quote of a book in a foreign language than using English words in your daily chat with random people. This type of language most likely came into existence after Japan lost the Second World War and became more and more Americanized. Before that I would rather expect Japanese to have a rather negative attitude against foreign people and especially against Americans. When you look at history in the 19 century so a bit before the First World War Japan has been isolated for around 200 years from every other country, so around the Second World War I would guess that a bit of a dislike against every other country would still berecognizable, since this attitude should still be in the people. And after Japan has been opend to international trading Britians and Americans has treated them like every other backward Asian country, which mostly pissed them off.

As usual you fanboys are first trying to defend their shit before you actually think about what I said. What is wrong with you that you don’t hold back even if you embarrass yourself because you clearly show how little you know about the stuff you talk about? Inform yourself at least a little bit about Japans history or its culture before talking about historical anime. I would recommend doing it anyways, because you probably will get a different view over anime as a medium.
[/spoiler]

How am I a fanboy of a movie I've seen once 2 days ago? I just pointed out a couple of areas where (despite the inane wall of text you wrote as a reply) you were straight up wrong about.

If anything you're the one that acts like a fanboy.
 
Jun 25, 2014 9:40 AM

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SimmianPrime said:


How am I a fanboy of a movie I've seen once 2 days ago? I just pointed out a couple of areas where (despite the inane wall of text you wrote as a reply) you were straight up wrong about.

If anything you're the one that acts like a fanboy.


When becomming a fan of a show time doesnt matter, you can be a fan right after you watch it, but i see how ur unable to understand the definition of fan or fanboy since you accuse me to be one, which is just ridiculous. You can accuse me being a hater, but since i have reasons based on logic why i dislike the show and since you could not debunk why any of this reasons shouldnt be influencing your point of view, im afraid even that would be ridiculous.

The second reason why you are a fanboy for me is your past where you clearly showed to be a Lotgh fanboy which couldnt make any meaningfull argument why to like the show and you clearly have the same attitude right now. Thats how fanboys are: defending their shows, even though on a logical based view (and probably even their own view, they are just to afraid to talk) the show lacks in so many things.

You know i just pointed out what bothers me about the show (and also many things based on reason and common sense so they should count for everyone), but thats the point: i dont tell you to dislike the show.I say its shit. Its YOU who has a problem with my opinion, since you started the discussion (if you can name it that). You dont see me going around writing to everyone that they have shit taste and that the reason why they dislike shows is idiotic, which you did.
 
Jun 26, 2014 3:59 AM

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SimmianPrime said:
I genuinely lol'd at your "plot hole" of them speaking 2 words of English. They spoke more words of French, Italian and German....were those plot holes as well?

It does ruin the feel of the setting, since the Japanese language sure wasn't full with English words in the early 30s. "Nice play/catch" is more something you would hear them say now. Usually big productions research the setting and make sure it feels authentic. The Wind Rises however didn't feel like it were the 30s. It gave more of an contemporary feel than a 30s feel.

Anyway, I liked the movie. The dream sequences were really trippy, sometimes feeling as if Mamoru Oshii was working on those bits. Everything was pretty much fine until the romance started. The whole "fell in love with you since when you were ten" and "The Wind Rises" scene where Jiro wrestles with an umbrella were some of the low points of the movie. I understand it's historical, but the portrayal was sure cheesy and ruined the flow of the movie. Another thing I disliked was the animation aspect in some scenes, where they had to show how big their budget was by making an earthquake feel like some big wave that hit the town.

Overall it kinda suffers the way Disney movies suffer. It has lots of potential, but it feels the urge to stay Ghibli, without daring to give it a more unique feel.

Highlight of the movie: "Hitler-san"

"Your sight, my delight. Will you marry me?"
 
Jun 27, 2014 10:53 PM

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Good movie, although I had some gripes is several places:

-The mouthed sound effects...did they spend the entire budget on the music and backgrounds leaving none left for the sound effects, so they had to make due with their mouths? The sounds for the planes, explosions, and during the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 sounded like I was watching a guy put on a zero-budget (pun-intended) puppet show.

-Jiro's fantasies/lucid dreams...I know all his meetings with Caporoni were farfetched and likely were all in his head, but sometimes I didn't know whether he was imagining things or if he was experiencing them as they happened.

-Jiro's legacy...I know by having his wife die of illness, it was tear-jerking sad in Miyazaki fashion (or at least attempts to be), but not really true to the real Jiro Horikoshi, because he ended up living a long enough life with his wife to have five kids! I haven't been this irritated since the writers killed off Huo Yuanjia's children in Jet Li's Fearless movie. If they're going to make a historical drama (that was already this historically accurate), I think they should have focused less on tragic romance, and more of the real Jiro Horikoshi's views towards the horrors of a futile war that he firmly expressed about in his writings. They certainly had plenty of material in Jiro's diary to work off of (and even Miyazaki's own personal first-hand experiences of war). From a storyteller's POV, I think it would have been far more interesting to have an old Jiro tell his life story in entirely flashbacks that comprise of the movie...where his wife doesn't die for no good reason other than the sole purpose of tugging on our heartstrings.

I wonder if Miyazaki read The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann, since he included Hans Castorp (the German guy at the hotel), which is also the reason why Jiro was wanted for arrest due to his breif connection with him.

While I still liked the movie, I think Miyazaki's lost a bit of his touch in his writing, screenplay, and directing...pretty much everything felt a bit dull. I also can't help but think he ripped off Tatsuo Hori's theme of tuberculosis, despite the movie being half a "tribute" in his name.

Amidst all the praise and criticism, there was some controversy too, surrounding this movie from all sides; almost all of which is unjustified or ludicrous. The anti-smoking group can go smoke a dick; this movie and it's tobacco-smoking was true to the times. "Leftists were unhappy that a warplane designer was the film's protagonist"...Leftists are unhappy about almost everything because a stick is up their butt. I bet they're the same people who think all Germans are Nazis. Pretty sure these people are also the kind to blame the gun, instead of the person pulling the trigger. Mayo Mitama (from Sayonara Zetsubou Sensei) must be in China now, working in sticks that shoot into people's butts to whomever sits on the chairs. I'm not surprised however that some groups of people are legitimately pissed since they left out a lot of the darker side of history in the film for a more romanticized movie (to be more kid-friendly).

TL;DR:
I guess in the end, I both liked the movie, and hated it at the same time. Hopefully this will be Miyazaki's last movie...for real this time.
Modified by 4kicks, Jun 27, 2014 11:07 PM
 
Jun 27, 2014 11:28 PM

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4kicks said:

As Jiro's character is fictionalized for he was never ashamed or anything about that he made a plane that killed people, you shouldn't care about his fictionalized wife thing too. It's just that Miyazaki only borrowed names, the movie is far from the actual history.
日本人はイッちゃってるよ
あいつら未来に生きてんな
 
Jul 1, 2014 2:11 PM

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Beautiful movie. And yet sad at the same time.
I like how those Jiro's fantasies blended nicely with whole movie.

This one is sure the most serious and adult Ghibli's work. All those motives that runs deep through the story. Though it's somehow slow to draw you in for the same reason. In fact, this movie was not as factual as you would expected, it was more about Miyazaki's own life and less about Horikoshi. And at the same time, it was skillfull merge of Horikoshi's life and Hori Tatsuo's Kaze Tachinu novel. Either way, they managed to show the atmosphere of those times pretty well. And contrary to Grave of the Fireflies I will definitely watch this again sometimes.

And the last scene... I can see its two meanings, one is very clear but the second one - that really was a goodbye from Miyazaki and his message to happily live on even when he won't be there... it's all about enjoying our lives while we still can. Ghibli movies somehow always evokes this feeling in me.

8/10
Modified by Mich666, Jul 1, 2014 2:34 PM
 
Jul 8, 2014 10:16 AM

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Not my cup of tea. It was an all right movie but no where near Miyazaki's best films. The plot was boring IMO until Naoko got introduced and there was no build up towards the end. Nothing special

7/10 for me
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Jelly?
 
Jul 14, 2014 8:09 AM

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I loved every aspect of this film. Historically interesting as well as heartwarming.
 
Jul 14, 2014 11:37 PM

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it was boring..and jiro had this weird voice.
also the romance sucks, Jiro married the little girl, he's a pedophile.. i can't believe it..
i'm glad that she
Modified by zoze, Jul 25, 2014 7:04 AM
 
Jul 17, 2014 10:49 AM

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I can only echo what others have said about the romance in this moive: It is terribly rushed and while some scenes are nice in itself the overall feeling I had about this subplot was very dissatisfying.
However, it had great imagery in its dreams and flight sequences that managed to feel trippy/passionate when they needed to be and gave the movie a lot of imemrsion back that was lost with the romance.

Likewise, my favourite characters in the movie are both side characters: Caproni is a wonderful comrade and journeys along Jiro whiel contemplating the status of an engineer in unsteady, war-filled times and Castrop..Castrop was something else. I LOVE Thomas Mann and The Magic Mountain is one of the best novels that Germany produced in the 20th century and the entire scene was just wonderful and felt like it was directly taken from the novel itself and put into another work. Splendid job here, especially considering that the philosophical udnertones were dead-on.
The overall detail level of the German locations in egenral were quite amazing. Lots of neat details that show just how much work he put into this movie.

The OST was amazing as well (The Congress Dances!) and while I agree that the earthquake scene was overdone and that some details in a few scenes were rather low quality, it was still an all around well-produced movie. As for the dub... I guess it was ok. Werner Herzog has the best performance in the English version, though. Nevertheless, anything what I heard from Anno seemed solid as well.

Overall, I am torn about this: I really want to love this movie, but the romance just keeps dragging it down for me.. I guess it is between a 7 and an 8 for me.
Modified by Nidhoeggr, Jul 17, 2014 10:53 AM
Stone Ocean adaption when?
 
Jul 18, 2014 10:44 AM

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Flawlessly amazing :)
 
Jul 22, 2014 7:15 AM

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Good movie.

btw I didn't understand if the main character was a genius or an idiot, he asked his wife if he could smoke and she was sick, wtf that makes no sense.
 
Jul 22, 2014 6:11 PM

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bigzzcobzz said:
Good movie.

btw I didn't understand if the main character was a genius or an idiot, he asked his wife if he could smoke and she was sick, wtf that makes no sense.

They both know they don't have much time left with each other, so they do what they want to make each other happy while theres still time.
 
Jul 25, 2014 9:36 AM
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ArcAdeAlchemist said:
I was a little upset that Naoko lost her French accent.. And we never actually saw her die... But that's preferences... This was a Fantastic conclusion to Miyazakis career.. Also ghibli films have such amazing dubs... JGL as jirou was genius.


I agree that the Ghibli dubs are all genuinely well done, but I was honestly very disappointed with The Wind Rises. And I'm sorry but JGL was not good at all. He sounded like he was just reading cue cards with zero emotion. That really killed the dub for me, which is a shame because Whitman, Short, and Tucci put a lot of emotion and heart and energy into their performances, but when JGL is this lifeless, it smashes any positives the dub may have. The chemistry between him and Emily as Nahoko, I'm sorry to say, fell flat on its face. Emily DID do a pretty good job as Nahoko, but when JGL sounds monotonous and lifeless, then there's no genuine chemistry between them. Because of that, the love story is disappointingly ineffective in the dub.

Don't get me wrong, there WERE parts of the Wind Rises dub I did like: the use of accents was good and there were a FEW good performances from some characters, but everybody else really didn't stand out to me and overall I found it to be the worst of the Disney-Ghibli dubs. But that's just me.
 
Jul 26, 2014 2:38 AM

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Planes. Planes. Planes! Even though I don't know anything about planes, I love this movie. :3

"Let me keep believing... so that I can keep on living."
 
Jul 31, 2014 6:29 AM

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Finally I saw the movie on the original japanese dub. And O.o Hideaki Anno did a great job as a seiyuu!
 
Aug 5, 2014 9:21 AM

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I was expecting an average experience and that's exactly what I got. From the first time I even heard of this movie, I knew exactly how it was going to be. Miyazaki being old and feeling the need to forcefeed people a magnum opus that nobody needed or wanted. Unfortunately an anime pretending to be quality cinema is usually a bad anime, even if Miyazaki himself refuses to consider his works to be anime.
 
Aug 6, 2014 1:45 AM

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nothing to say finally it's a Ghibli anime
 
Aug 8, 2014 9:51 PM

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That movie gave me an idea of how to be a creative engineer, simple but definitely not a cliche or something. Imaginative and descriptive components and that type of dramatic romance were the most interesting parts throughtout the movie for me.
 
Aug 13, 2014 4:06 PM
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a fantastic movie. giving me at the end a big impression of thinking about my own life compared to the main character, though it was fictional. I've watched it in theatre and I felt very bad, when the audience who were sitting behind me were crying and I didn't. Well, I've seen it in ger dub version and I'm fine with it, didn't affect the film in a bad way. I expected that Miyazaki's last movie would be a 11/10, unfortunately I give it a 9/10.
 
Aug 19, 2014 1:45 PM
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great movie.
Altough i am a bit dissapionted about the main character making some stupid choices especially in regards to his wife.
I suppose i really just did not like his leaving so he did not have to see her death.
Still 5/5 because it is still a great movie.
Just wish the ending was a little happier.

Well i suppose i can confort my self with the fact that the real life counterparts of the main charaters both got pretty old
 
Sep 2, 2014 1:53 AM

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average /10
 
Sep 14, 2014 11:10 PM
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GohanwaOkazu said:
I believe this is a film that Hayao Miyazaki wanted and felt had to be made for the Japanese audience. Whether will it will be liked by the audience in Japan or worldwide was secondary issue to him while he was making it.

Without knowing the social-cultural contexts of the production of this film, it's a bit hard to understand the strong message (it's pretty obvious for the Japanese, but somehow it was misunderstood elsewhere). The Great Eastern Japan Earthquake of 2011 shook Japan entirely with uncertainty with over 18,500 people dead or missing and 400,000 homes destroyed; at one point there was serious risk that 40 million residents in the Kanto Region including Tokyo had to evacuate because of the defunct nuclear power plant. Then, there was ongoing conflict at sea with China over the small islands, which fueled the increasing popularity of the rightist nationalist wing in politics among the younger generation of Japan, amid fears that war is inevitable in the future, sometime soon.

The wind was rising. And it was not a gentle breeze; it was a strong wind of turmoil which had very striking dark similarities to pre-war Japan. The Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 produced fear among Japanese people that ethnic Koreans and Chinese were plotting a revolt and releasing poison in the wells- which was exploited by right-wingers and led to a massacre of hundreds of innocent people. Also, the uncertainty created by Great Depression in 1929 also fueled the rightists and eventually the feeble democracy was overwhelmed by the military which drove Japan into expansionism, endless war with China, and subsequent defeat in the Asia-Pacific War.

Kaze Tachinu (The Wind Rises) is not a story about ordinary heroism. The Japanese know too vividly from recent memory that at the period of crisis a simple superhero cannot solve the situation; a Batman or two cannot solve real issues like severe natural disasters and looming war. The issue is too big and serious and complex for that; at time of crisis an all-promising hero is usually the villain. As in the film and reality, preachers preach nonsense with authoritative voice. But then what can normal people do? Be happy and join the mob? Or stand back in complete apathy, like some in the very young generation of the Japanese? Or kill oneself in despair, like some people chose to do after they lost hope after the Earthquake?

Jiro in Kaze Tachinu lives on positively by doing what he is best at doing. It's his lifework to make planes; he does not stop it although he knows Naoko is dying. Naoko knows that life is short and instead of being kept alive in hospital at vegetative level tries to live and burn out for her love, supporting Jiro.

The wind rises. We must live.

Kaze Tachinu is a strong ode for human dignity, with direct messages to the Japanese audience at the time of crisis, ongoing peril, helplessness, and apathy. It is also an allegory that sends off alarms (after all Jiro made the best planes that never came back). Whether it would be appreciated sympathetically in Japan or worldwide was least of Miyazaki's concern when he made this film. He had to make it as an aging son of a factory manager supplying materials for warplanes during WW2. It's meant to be his last will and testament (although I do hope he'll change his mind and make more films).

Overall, this isn't my most favorite film of Miyazaki, but some scenes are very beautiful and poetic (like the marriage and first night) that I can never slate this as score: 6/10 or call it underwhelming. I thought it was a masterpiece while seeing at the theater and I still think it is.


Thx for sharing.

For me is a 7/10.
 
Sep 15, 2014 4:24 AM

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Damn, Naoko died. >_< I consoled myself by reading elsewhere that in real life his wife didn't have tuberculosis and they had children.

Anywhere and in any times, the future is uncertain anyways so the wind will always rise and as always, we must try to live.

This is not my favorite Ghibli or Miyazaki film but it's still great. 7/10
Nothing is an absolute reality, all is permitted.
 
Sep 16, 2014 3:12 AM

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Really sad at all the hate this show is getting, it is nothing short of a masterpiece imo, i could really feel Miyazaki's emotions poured into this unlike never before. Tonari no Totoro has always been my favorite Ghibli film, this is now no. 2. Still annoyed it was beaten to an Oscar by Frozen :(

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Sep 18, 2014 8:24 PM

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Naoko-san, you will be missed :<
 
Sep 26, 2014 1:49 PM

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And here I thought all ghibli movies were shit. This movie was brilliant! I absolutely loved it.
 
Nov 17, 2014 11:24 AM

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I don't regret watching at all.

I agree with one thing. As much as I don't like smoking, that's how it was. Japan is one of the core smoking places of the world. It just reflects in the movie, especially with the economy in a tank and the engineers working that buns off DURING World War II. Keeping that in mind, I can easily imagine that the director was not trying to force pro-smoking. Miyazaki, who does a lot of fantasy works, seems to care about how the atmosphere of something looks, whether animal or human.

The criticism of the movie seems to stem from disliking the person Mizayaki himself (especially his politics) and how Miyazaki romanticizes a particular engineer, from his marriage and tragic love life, which didn't happen in real life, to how he modifies history. This isn't a documentary, its a fiction because the director wanted to give a tribute. Of course it's going to be dramatized. The question is whether you like it or not.

The man said he loves planes and I think you can really tell whiel watching this movie. I rarely see a show where there is so much life in it. Ten minutes in and there's life and labor. WWII, freakin' Oxen, lack of urbanizing, using wells, etc.

And I LOVE AIRPLANES TOO! That's why I was engaged so easily. The movie "doesn't have a goal"? We're following the life of an engineer and his passion of planes (or rather the director's passion of planes). When you really like something, you can prove it. You engage yourself to learn/study more in that thing you like, and in the instance of planes, it's how its built and how it flies, what's in it, etc. As a director/producer, it's easier to do. The scenes of imagining the planes fly and the internal parts, wow. It does look like it's through an engineer's eyes. I mean, I never seen graph paper look so...it's graph paper! LOL. So lively. And the freakin' meeting between engineers.

Why would people criticize the dreams/imagination parts? What's wrong with that? Sure its not real.

Now..Horikoshi. Miyazaki, I know Anno is your friend and that he's a director, but using what he [Anno] knows to exhibit Jiro's passion is not convincing. Especially for love.

There's more to say, such as why there was the special police and what was going on with Calstrop. I too have my irks with the romance; it was also a long movie, which i think it drags in some places, but has its fun moments that gives it a human feel even if the scenes don't have to be there.

And I get to cry. That's all.
Modified by shakeyourpup45, Nov 17, 2014 5:20 PM
 
Nov 17, 2014 11:32 AM

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In one word, beautiful.

I was taken by the animation & really enjoyed the score. The romance was heart warming yet saddening. Like some others, this won't go down as my favorite or top 3 Miyazaki movie. I enjoyed this more than Ponyo & would choose it over Castle of Cagliostro but it didn't come close to Princess Mononoke, Howl's Moving Castle, Nausicaa..., Castle In The Sky, & especially Spirited Away. I actually haven't watched The Aviator but I may this weekend, I'm wondering how they compare. From what I recall that also appeared to be a drawn out affair about a guy who made planes. I expect I will have liked this one better. I somehow felt empty and confused at the end, this is the only Miyazaki film I wasn't sure how it was supposed to make me feel. Just kinda, life sucks but you go on living and doing your best. I think in the end, there are some Ghibli films I love to watch and re-watch but this doesn't feel like it will be one of them. I really hope some day we get more animated films like the ones Miyazaki gave us.

7/10.
Such junk...
 
Nov 23, 2014 2:02 AM

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If you enjoy wasting your time, watch this movie. Following on the hype train I finally got around to watching this film. I kept watching, waiting for plot, character developments, or something to grab me and convince me why I should care about this film and why it is important and good.

This did not happen.

Instead we received a boring biopic about a relatively obscure engineer who's life, frankly, would have been better off forgotten given the amount of hours wasted watching its unremarkable happenings play out in fancy digital-looking graphics in a tired and cliched setting unbecoming of the once-great Ghibli of Mononoke, Nausicaa Laputa fame.
 
Dec 13, 2014 11:41 PM

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The romantic interaction is the one aspect that was most forced and weakest component of the movie, yet it was also the most enjoyable to watch.
Even when I was in crowd, I was always alone
 
Dec 16, 2014 2:22 AM

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Wow, I am really impressed by this film, for some reason this one really stands out to me among the other studio ghibli flms. I really liked the animation, art, traditional themes and soundtracks, tying into history, voice acting, and I thought the topic of engineering was very intriguing (I'm not trying to sound like a reviewer, I'm just saying I liked pretty much all of this animation).

I liked both aspects of the film, on a love tale and crafting a new style of aircraft.

Wow, I really like Kadokawa's character, he is so realistic.
Those were some beautiful airplanes alright.

 
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