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Poll: In your opinion the end is


Dec 28, 2015 1:24 AM

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He could have become a ranger and do wolf stuff on the side.

It was also ridiculous that he did not bother to visit his mother after his departure.
 
Dec 31, 2015 10:15 AM
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Pknoctis said:
The movie's ending pissed me off.


the ending made me so mad
 
Jan 13, 2016 12:32 AM
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I wanted Ame to break one of his legs and die, I can't stand ungrateful brats like him.
hi
 
Mar 20, 2016 5:31 PM

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It would be good if ame was at the door at the end of the movie. It was almost too bittersweet.



 
Apr 27, 2016 4:50 AM

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I'll post my discussion point since it's relevant here too.

I thought the Ame ending was a bit stupid. For one he lives in the forest close to his mom... I don't know why it had to be so final. I understand him being fully immersed but I still think it's stupid how final they made that moment. Like she had to let completely go of him, her 10 year old boy. I don't care if he is a grown wolf, he isn't just a wolf, he is more than a wolf. I don't know why the movie made it seem like it had to be one or the other. Honestly he could do more good for the mountain as a conservationist than as whatever the fox taught him to be, definitely so if you combine both aspects. But ya know, he is 10... so he could have waited a bit longer. He isn't a wolf, wolves rarely make it to 10 in the wild. So while I understand he isn't human, he isn't a wolf either. It's fine for him to side one way or the other. I just feel it was all haphazard and wrong the way it went down.

Also his mom just suffered a ridiculous fall, who in the world would jump right back into the forest instead of at least getting her to a hospital. I mean he could return to the forest right after that. Just a really silly ending in terms of Ame.
Modified by Nonchalance_, Apr 27, 2016 4:57 AM
 
May 8, 2016 3:48 PM
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I understand why he chose being a wolf, but why can't he visit her every once in a while....All in all, it was a pretty good movie.
 
May 14, 2016 3:25 AM
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Overall I enjoyed the movie, and I was certainly expecting feels from the start. In regards to Ame's decision and the implications associated with it however, a reddit user does an excellent job of explaining how I generally feel about it:



Also, if the director's intent was for me to come to accept Ame's decision like his mother did (especially for them to never see each other again), then for those of us who do not readily accept his decision, there needs to be a fine line between "did we miss the message, the theme, the hints, etc" as oppose to "did the director fail to make all of that obvious and persuade us?" Obviously, the more people there are that detest Ame's chosen path, the stronger the case can be made for the latter since it shouldn't be the common viewer's responsibility to go beyond the movie and do research (e.g. on the behavior of wolves), read people's analysis or reviews and opinions, etc in order to try and arrive at the intended conclusion and understanding that the director wanted for us. If the director actually wanted us to feel this way on the other hand...
Modified by Joshuya_Raidon, May 14, 2016 3:59 AM
 
May 19, 2016 11:43 PM

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I liked the ending, he made his choice. Although I don't see what's stopping him from visiting every once in awhile. Even family's with horrible relationships visit on thanksgiving and/or Christmas. So I do think he made a good choice for himself but I don't think that has to mean leaving forever, I see no reason why he can't comeback and say hi sometimes.
 
May 22, 2016 2:02 PM
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In the case of Ame, those who didn't like his ending, seem to miss the point.

The first indication of change was shown when he caught the crested kingfisher in the winter. That was the moment when his wolf side became more dominant or apparent. When he started going to elementary school he would often and more accompany his mother to her workplace where he can spend time with the aged wolf there. By the time he got to 3rd grade he found a "teacher" in the forest where he would learn how to be a part of nature. Time has passed and his "teacher" has broken his leg and will soon die. Ame came home and said "Someone has to take the place of my teacher and carry on his duties". This is implication on the theme circle of life/balance in nature where everything is linked, every animal has his place there. This was the calling for Ame. At first he gave in to his mother's wish to stay but at his age he was "adult" wolf already which his mother and his father in the dream sequence has pointed out. At the end he had to follow his instinct of his animal side and be part of the nature. It's shown he's in full-grown wolf-form. As he became a wolf the only emotion he was able to show her at end was by howling.

That's my take on his ending.

SuperComicGeek said:
I liked the ending, he made his choice. Although I don't see what's stopping him from visiting every once in awhile. Even family's with horrible relationships visit on thanksgiving and/or Christmas. So I do think he made a good choice for himself but I don't think that has to mean leaving forever, I see no reason why he can't comeback and say hi sometimes.


I don't think it is final that he would never visit his mother again. It is shown at the end that he's still nearby the house and for me it's a possibility that he might visit his mother once in while. But I rather guess that he has forsaken his human side and became entirely an animal at the end.
Modified by Salmonaru, May 22, 2016 2:19 PM
 
May 29, 2016 12:23 AM

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Good or bad? Little bit of both I would say. Him leaving is pretty important because it shows us how far he has grown since he was a little boy. Leaving the safety and comfort of home is a sign that Ame is no longer the timid and weak little boy he once was. Him accepting the fact that he's a wolf and deciding to become the new "Master of the Mountains" was really great to see in terms of character of development.

The one part that I was hoping they would show would be him coming back home every now and then to visit poor Mother who endured so much for him and Yuki. That, and along with the fact that I can't believe he just ran off like that, are my bad points about this.

Good on the mother for accepting his choices in the end and being happy for him regardless of his chosen path like a mother should.
 
Jun 4, 2016 7:26 PM
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Salmonaru said:
In the case of Ame, those who didn't like his ending, seem to miss the point.

The first indication of change was shown when he caught the crested kingfisher in the winter. That was the moment when his wolf side became more dominant or apparent. When he started going to elementary school he would often and more accompany his mother to her workplace where he can spend time with the aged wolf there. By the time he got to 3rd grade he found a "teacher" in the forest where he would learn how to be a part of nature. Time has passed and his "teacher" has broken his leg and will soon die. Ame came home and said "Someone has to take the place of my teacher and carry on his duties". This is implication on the theme circle of life/balance in nature where everything is linked, every animal has his place there. This was the calling for Ame. At first he gave in to his mother's wish to stay but at his age he was "adult" wolf already which his mother and his father in the dream sequence has pointed out. At the end he had to follow his instinct of his animal side and be part of the nature. It's shown he's in full-grown wolf-form. As he became a wolf the only emotion he was able to show her at end was by howling.

That's my take on his ending.

SuperComicGeek said:
I liked the ending, he made his choice. Although I don't see what's stopping him from visiting every once in awhile. Even family's with horrible relationships visit on thanksgiving and/or Christmas. So I do think he made a good choice for himself but I don't think that has to mean leaving forever, I see no reason why he can't comeback and say hi sometimes.


I don't think it is final that he would never visit his mother again. It is shown at the end that he's still nearby the house and for me it's a possibility that he might visit his mother once in while. But I rather guess that he has forsaken his human side and became entirely an animal at the end.


BEAUTIFUL EXPLANATION.! :D
 
Jun 22, 2016 2:44 PM

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They were raised spoiled to be honest. Maybe not materialistic spoiled, but still. Whenever they would throw a tantrum the mom would give in easily. Of curse at least one of the two would end up selfish! To be honest, at least he deserves some credit since the carried her to the parking lot, and didn't let her to die where she fell. I didn't find it emotional or anything. That Hana lacked common sense either way, so who cares, she got over it.
 
Jul 2, 2016 8:56 AM

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The ending was indeed hard to swallow, but I found it the most fitting ending.

Like people have already said, we're looking at Ame's actions too much from a human perspective. During his youth, he spent all his time in the forest, embracing his wolf half more and more, and thus, growing up as a wolf. Meaning he matured as a wolf as well. Young brains have extremely high plasticity, so it wouldn't surprise me in the slightest if his brain developed into something more similar to a wolf's brain than a human's brain. At least socially, he had developed into a wolf. It's apparent in him interacting with human beings less and less, and more and more with the animals in the forest. Eventually, Yuki and Hana are the only human beings he even shows his face to. Therefore, I don't think we can judge his actions in human social terms at all. He did show gratitude for all she's done for him. When she cryingly told him that she hadn't done anything for him yet, he ran up all the way to the top of the mountain and howled loudly, showing him. To me, that was his way of saying "Look at me. Look at how big and magnificent I've become. I have you to thank for this." I think that's what Hana realised, too, and that's why she told him to "Live on steadily/healthily" and told him her goodbyes.

Some people are complaining about him laying her on the pavement and not caring for her until she was lying in bed, warmly. Perfectly sensible human behaviour. But Ame lost a great part of his connection to his human side. Leaving a note? Same story. Besides, what should he have said? “I have chosen to be a wolf, so goodbye, and thank you for everything”? I don’t think a note would’ve added anything that Hana didn’t already understand. She’s not his mother for nothing. Another complaint is him not visiting her. It's never been shown, so there are a lot of people who think he will visit her every now and then in the future, too. Personally, I don't think he will. Once mature wolves leave their pack, they don't go back. He will still remember her, think of her, and still care for her, because although choosing his wolf side, he won't have forgotten about his human side. But that doesn't mean he will behave like a human again.

But of course, that's just my interpretation. Nobody (or if anyone, it's the script writer of this film) can really give a hard "truth". That's why interpretations exist.

On to Yuki. Contrarily, Yuki spent her youth trying to fit in, things like that moment with the treasure boxes and the incident with Souhei motivating her to act like a normal human girl. It was only that rainy day where she and Souhei were stuck in school and she showed him her wolf appearance, that she accepted her wolf half as well, while still trying to fit in among humans.

And the sweet, strong Hana. From the beginning, Hana had resolved to let them choose their own path. She did a spectacular job at that, trying to influence them as little as possible. I know that if you look at it from a human raising perspective, her way of raising them was soft. However, I don't think she should've been more hard on them, for the sole reason that she would break her vow of letting them choose by themselves that way. Because telling them to sit still and not run around recklessly is perfectly sensible if you raise humans. If you raise a purely human being, that is. If she would've treated them harsher, she would've imposed human behaviour on them, and therefore influencing their choice.

In the end, when she felt that Ame was ready to leave, she got scared and tried to keep him in. Ame obliged only because he cared about her and felt guilty about leaving her. That’s why he told Yuki to stay with their mother that day. And maybe that’s why he also wanted to leave without mentioning it. Because he felt like that was what he had to do, yes, but maybe also because he thought that would make it easier for her. Because despite how it looks, he really cared for Hana. And when he finally left, Hana understood his feelings and knew it was time to let him go, and he in turn understood that she wanted to be assured that she did a good job in raising him.

It felt bittersweet, seeing Hana end up all alone. But then again, that's an important theme of this movie: knowing how and when to let your children go. She realised that she had to let Ame go. As for Yuki, she probably went to the dorms because there wasn’t much nearby and it would’ve been very impractical to let her commute for like 6 hours every day just to go to school. She probably comes back home in the holidays. But Hana will let her go when she turns into an adult, too. That doesn’t mean that for either Yuki or Ame their bond with their parent is broken. Ame will always remember her, and Yuki will continue visiting her, continuing an ordinary mother and daughter relationship.
 
Jan 3, 2017 9:28 PM
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I only just watched this movie today, and man I'm so glad to see people are still somewhat discussing it, as MAN, THE FEELS.

I hated the ending. Haaated it. I'm very close with my mom and have lots of siblings, and the thought of one of them just running off like that, after all she's done... augh.

I see people here defending him because "he's a wolf, not a human," but that doesn't cut it for me. Ame's father--and to a lesser extent, his sister--both showed it was more than possible for them to embrace both sides of themselves. Even if Ame wanted a more involved life in the wild than just nightly excursions, nothing in how his father and sister acted or anything the movie implied suggested he had to go so utterly rogue. Heck, even the not-seen relatives of Ame's dad apparently had ties with purely human relatives, so that's more proof that werewolves ditching out wasn't a set in stone thing. Especially when real wolves form solid family based packs. A lone wolf is usually a dead wolf.

I had no problem with the fact that he DID want to live as a wolf... I just think HOW he did it could've been shown so much better. Fighting and pretty badly hurting the sister who so long protected him? Leaving his injured mom in a parking lot and then running off without a single word? All to go play 'king of the forest' or whatever, although how exactly either Sensei or him did any good for the mountain wasn't shown at all. Not to mention that if any conservationist hears a supposedly extinct wolf howling it up out there he'll probably be captured for conservation purposes...

Bleh. I loved the early and middle parts of the movie, even though they were often sad (the dad dying, poor Hana all alone and struggling...), but I think the last part could've been handled so much better. Ame's struggle could've been shown more delicately than him simply becoming a cold and even aggressive monster. Yuki could've not completely abandoned the wolf side she once loved so much. Heck, even if they'd stuck to those paths, I could've stomached it if they'd had some credits montage showing both of them at least visiting their mother--Hana and Yuki going to see Ame's forest, Ame occasionally slipping in for a meal with them. But as it was it felt like poor Hana was abandoned and both kids got so polarized that they lost something. Ame more so, but Yuki to some extent as well. It was a lovely movie but the last part of it did nothing for me. >___<

@Joshuya_Raidon: That reddit user summarized it very well. The two children both seemed to think they had to choose one or the other entirely and abandon the other side of themselves, and their mother got left behind in the gap between.
Modified by Fireflydrake, Jan 3, 2017 9:34 PM
 
Jan 8, 2017 4:40 PM
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Fireflydrake said:
I only just watched this movie today, and man I'm so glad to see people are still somewhat discussing it, as MAN, THE FEELS.

I hated the ending. Haaated it. I'm very close with my mom and have lots of siblings, and the thought of one of them just running off like that, after all she's done... augh.

I see people here defending him because "he's a wolf, not a human," but that doesn't cut it for me. Ame's father--and to a lesser extent, his sister--both showed it was more than possible for them to embrace both sides of themselves. Even if Ame wanted a more involved life in the wild than just nightly excursions, nothing in how his father and sister acted or anything the movie implied suggested he had to go so utterly rogue. Heck, even the not-seen relatives of Ame's dad apparently had ties with purely human relatives, so that's more proof that werewolves ditching out wasn't a set in stone thing. Especially when real wolves form solid family based packs. A lone wolf is usually a dead wolf.

I had no problem with the fact that he DID want to live as a wolf... I just think HOW he did it could've been shown so much better. Fighting and pretty badly hurting the sister who so long protected him? Leaving his injured mom in a parking lot and then running off without a single word? All to go play 'king of the forest' or whatever, although how exactly either Sensei or him did any good for the mountain wasn't shown at all. Not to mention that if any conservationist hears a supposedly extinct wolf howling it up out there he'll probably be captured for conservation purposes...

Bleh. I loved the early and middle parts of the movie, even though they were often sad (the dad dying, poor Hana all alone and struggling...), but I think the last part could've been handled so much better. Ame's struggle could've been shown more delicately than him simply becoming a cold and even aggressive monster. Yuki could've not completely abandoned the wolf side she once loved so much. Heck, even if they'd stuck to those paths, I could've stomached it if they'd had some credits montage showing both of them at least visiting their mother--Hana and Yuki going to see Ame's forest, Ame occasionally slipping in for a meal with them. But as it was it felt like poor Hana was abandoned and both kids got so polarized that they lost something. Ame more so, but Yuki to some extent as well. It was a lovely movie but the last part of it did nothing for me. >___<

@Joshuya_Raidon: That reddit user summarized it very well. The two children both seemed to think they had to choose one or the other entirely and abandon the other side of themselves, and their mother got left behind in the gap between.


I just watched it today, and I agree with your analysis. Overall the movie was very beautiful and the sentimentality touched me, but I cannot accept the ending as a "good thing". What is the message supposed to be? That no matter how much your family sacrifices for you, you can abandon them and do whatever you want? Hana is an extraordinarily kind and patient character, so I understand that she wouldn't hold a grudge against Ame for leaving, but to any outside observer he is an ungrateful and emotionless brat.

The ending would have been far, far better if Ame talked to his mom about his decision and occasionally visited her. But instead, he drops her off in a random parking lot and we are given the impression that his family never sees him again. That's 100% to the extreme of how he could have handled the situation, and as with almost everything in life, it's much better to strike a balance than to go to the extremes. I think Miyazaki's "Mononoke Hime" did a superior job in telling a story with similar themes.
 
Jan 9, 2017 11:27 AM

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Can't say I liked it. I understand the ending is supposed to convey that bittersweet feeling parents experience when they realize their children have finally grown up and become independent. But the whole scenario feels contrived for the sake of a sad conclusion.

To be fair, I think Hana did tell her children early on that they had the right to choose how they were going to live. I just felt that Ame gave up on his humanity too easily, and he ended up developing a rather unhealthy obsession for life as a wolf. That scene with him chasing after and relentlessly attacking his sister was one thing, but the fact that he was still willing to abandon his mother *right after* she had nearly been killed looking for him rubs me the wrong way. You would think he'd stick around a bit longer to reassure his family of his decision.

On the other hand, Yuki gravitating away from being a wolf made more sense to me. She always came across as more of an extrovert than her little brother. As much as she enjoyed running around, collecting dead animals/bugs (lol) and causing a ruckus, she didn't want to be ostracized from the other kids at school. That, and she's getting at the age where she'll be more self-consious about herself. The dude telling her she smelled like a dog was pretty much the final nail in that coffin. What girl wants to hear something like that?

That said, I find it hard to believe that she would leave her mother on her own knowing that Ame is gone doing his own thing.
That's some Eva-level bullshit right there.
 
Jan 11, 2017 8:16 PM
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Well, I just hope the mother won't be lonely.

Notably, I am worried about Ookami's body. This is one of those cases where I hope daddy's body, like most anime cliche, is taken to a government research lab for secret experimentation.
 
Feb 5, 2017 2:11 PM

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I thought it was a bad ending, i really can't symphatize with Ame, he now how much his mother has done for him and still treat her this way. The movie was fantastic but i personally don't like it when children don't give a fuck about their parents and then live their own life.

Yes they should make their own choices and move on, but the person who made you who you are should atleast be a part of your decision.
 
Jun 2, 2017 7:21 AM
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I think it was a big metaphor for having your child walk their own path.

He might of left her in the rain but that was to give the scene impact. Not him being a jerk.
 
Dec 28, 2017 9:28 PM
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I get it he had to make the decision based on his needs but seriously who runs away in the middle of a typhoon without a warning also his mother was practically dead when he found her couldn't he take her home and make sure she was ok also what happens after wards the ending is a cliff hanger but there's no sequel
 
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