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Teachers; do they earn enough respect from their students or is there too much disdain?

#1
Feb 18, 2013 10:45 AM
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Now there hasn't been too much news on this for a bit, but raising the topic should be fun.

The point of this topic is: as either former student, student or maybe even teacher (it would be great to have any input from a teacher) to share your experiences, views and thoughts on the current education system, and the relationship between teacher and student.

An *article on teachers being disrespectful towards students, and vice versa. Also something neutral.

Stories and experiences on violent children towards teachers

Blog by the name of: (Some) Teachers are Disrespectful Lazy Whiners

Opinions of the people
This is not the same question I am asking, but you get the gist of it.

*Articles are obviously biased, the first two that is.
 
#2
Feb 18, 2013 10:46 AM
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I hate the way most children treat their teachers. The language they use against them and the utter disregard for their feelings as humans is disgusting.
 
#3
Feb 18, 2013 10:51 AM
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It really comes down to the teacher. I've had racist sexist teachers before. Why should I respect them when they aren't doing their job correctly?

Most of the professional teachers I've seen however, don't receive as much recognition nor respect as I would think thy should deserve. That can't be helped though. There will always exist troublemakers.
 
#4
Feb 18, 2013 10:54 AM

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Kuromii said:
I hate the way most children treat their teachers. The language they use against them and the utter disregard for their feelings as humans is disgusting.


True, 20 years ago if some kid start to insult teacher he/she could beat him/her, that solve the problems, now teachers are too afraid cause one bad move and they can be sue for stupid reasons. Everyone know that and children use it all the time.
And also parnets who think their childrens are like an angel and can't harm anyone.
 
#5
Feb 18, 2013 11:06 AM

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There are good teachers and bad ones, I've known some that will cuss out their students just like the students would cuss them out. Haven't known any violent children who would actually harm a teacher, just a very few that would cuss one out.

Also, teachers need to be paid more especially in the inner city, it's a hazardous occupation in those places where you are teach kids who killed about as many people or more than the teacher had car crashes or traffic infractions in their lifetime and probably would try to kill them if they looked at them in the wrong light. People are worried about the next psycho mass shooter, those are few and far between, they should be worried about the gang bangers, drug dealers, and other wriff wraff in the classroom who have more of a chance of actually harming a teacher than the psycho.


 
#6
Feb 18, 2013 11:20 AM

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I have general disdain for the way that most students treat teachers, however there are a handful of teachers who don't care about their students or have some other serious problem with their attitude that makes me lose respect for them.
I don't have a signature.
 
#7
Feb 18, 2013 11:29 AM

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On my school they calling the teacher's by there surname's where is the world going to.(fucking brat's)
..
 
#8
Feb 18, 2013 11:31 AM

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It depends on a school and its students that attend.

When I was hopping to various high schools thanks to Hurricane Katrina, their were plenty of "students" that showed their teachers blatant disrespect and frankly, I was surprised that they were still allowed to attend school. It was shame because those teachers were really good at their jobs and that they were powerless to actually get rid of them.

The high school I graduated from had students that fully respected their teachers and did not tolerate any disrespect from its students.

I am currently in college and the respect that teachers get from students varies. Normally, students that show more respect to their teachers have higher grades in their class.
 
#9
Feb 18, 2013 11:46 AM

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It goes both ways, but it's really not the students fault when the teachers have been stripped of any power they may have once had over them.
 
Feb 18, 2013 1:02 PM

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Entirely depends on the school, the neighborhood around the school, whether it's a public school or not, the way the rest of the staff is, what they are teaching, who they are teaching to, etc. And even in the worst conditions you get good students or bad students just by chance or other variables (like if it's an elevator school or not - even if it's a shithole).

I went to a public school in los angeles full of gang members, noisy sluts, and overall assholes - but all the classes went smooth, the teachers were treated like pals, and people got good grades because they paid attention.

So really, ignoring everything I just said, it all comes down to the students in the end as long as the teacher isn't completely bullshitting their job or treating everyone like shit.

There are plenty - and I mean a MAJORITY - of places where students treat teachers perfectly fine, and vice versa.

The only time I've really seen genuine disrespect and hate towards an educator outside of one bickering annoying student or two, and completely warranted, was in city colleges. After attending a real uni and just going to a community one for a short time I can see why - these "teachers" are worse at their job than high school ones, and you're paying them for it.
Modified by TallonKarrde23, Feb 18, 2013 1:05 PM
 
Feb 18, 2013 4:14 PM

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potatoes.
i agree with yall.
 
Feb 18, 2013 4:19 PM

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I only respect teachers who can actually teach.
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Feb 18, 2013 5:58 PM

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I give teachers respect when they deserve it.
 
Feb 18, 2013 10:01 PM

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Sentakku said:
I give teachers respect when they deserve it.

But who are you to decide that? Too many kids these days think too much of themselves to respect any authority figure.
 
Feb 19, 2013 1:57 PM

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I respected some of my teachers, but there were some who were very political and told us things that definitely cross the boundary line. And most of them I told them I had a problem with it. I always got the same ignorant answer back, so my teachers/professors have to earn my respect. They don't automatically get it for having a position of power over me.

My absolute favorite teacher that I've ever had was disrespected every day and nothing made me more angry. I wish I could do something, but kids will be kids.
 
Feb 20, 2013 1:26 AM

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There are shitty brats and shitty adults including teachers, that's the world we live in. Is not like we don't have to tolerate shit from people in other jobs so why should teachers being seen a "poor souls" for having to tolerate the shit of children and teens?
Hey at least they can yell back unlike the most of us and get lots of payed vacation. I would like a job that gives me free time in summer and holidays too.
 
Feb 20, 2013 4:41 AM

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Monad said:

Hey at least they can yell back unlike the most of us and get lots of payed vacation.


This is far from the truth, no matter how you try and slice it.


As far as the topic at hand, I teach at the University level, so I don't typically encounter "problem students". Paying for a class with your hard earned money typically creates a different kind of attitude in regards to one's education in my opinion. Now in regards to flaws in the education system, well you could write a book on that. I think one of my biggest problems is just the sheer class size. I average 35 students in a class, which means it's hard to reach people on an individual level. This is something my fiance struggles with more than I (high school level teaching), as for me, if a student does not 'understand' something, there are study groups, math tutoring, etc provided for free by the University. For her though, students not understanding something is a larger deal with acts like No Child Left Behind, although our state is more 'leniant' with waivers than others.

I am also lucky in the fact that it is a very rare occasion that I have to deal with a parent. She is not so lucky of course. One of her students parents for instance this quarter has objections to the reading material including the text book itself, because her child is "too sensitive". It amused the hell out of me that her parents asked if she could be exempt from tests that involved WW2, because they made her so emotional when she read about it. Of course that was denied and they went to the school board to no avail, but each year she teaches there are more and more parents with ridiculous expectations or who automatically assume if their child is doing poorly it's obviously not their child's doing. She typically has more problems with parents than she does students in her class. Ah well, I digress. There are a long list of flaws in our education system and things that irritate me, but for me personally student attitudes (towards myself) are usually not one of them. Of course I teach classes in programming and mathematics which do not have as much of a teacher/student discussion dynamic as other classes, so this could explain some of that.

 
Feb 20, 2013 4:53 AM

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rekindledflame said:
Monad said:

Hey at least they can yell back unlike the most of us and get lots of payed vacation.


This is far from the truth, no matter how you try and slice it.



Huh? School close in summer do they not? Don't the teachers get payed those two and something months?
They also have about two weeks breaks on holidays like Christmas and Easter since schools close there too.
Most people working don't have that shit. They lucky too get two weeks the whole year and if.
Modified by Monad, Feb 20, 2013 6:24 AM
 
Feb 20, 2013 5:29 AM

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Monad said:
rekindledflame said:
Monad said:

Hey at least they can yell back unlike the most of us and get lots of payed vacation.


This is far from the truth, no matter how you try and slice it.



Huh? School close in summer do they not? Dodn't the teachers get payed those two and something months?
They also have about two weeks breaks on holidays like Christmas and Easter since schools close there too.
Most people working don't have that shit. They lucky too get two weeks the whole year and if.


You're paid for the days worked as agreed on your contract. If you miss days and do not have personal days, you receive less pay, just like any hourly job. How much is deducted is dependent on your contract or school district. My fiance's for instance is deducted by the cost of the substitute for that day assuming she is out of personal days. Mine on the other hand is computed by taking my quarterly salary and dividing the contracted days to compute a daily amount. Which is a considerable amount all things considered. In terms of personal days this also varies by school district, I personally receive 4 a year and my fiance receives 5. You can choose to have pay withheld from your paychecks so you continue to receive one in the summer, otherwise you will not get one, although I have heard in some school districts this is mandatory rather than voluntary. I'm definitely not saying we do not have extended time off, through the year, cause naturally we do, but it really isn't paid time off.
Modified by rekindledflame, Feb 20, 2013 5:43 AM

 
Feb 20, 2013 6:06 AM

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in my high school (Massachusetts, America), the dummer kids get, the more they will love teachers that are nice, funny, interesting, unique, let them get away with bad things...and cannot teach well or cannot teach everything the curriculum requires for the current unit/topic or cannot teach fast enough to meet the requirements of the curriculum.

This one English teacher (not mine) teaches breakdancing instead of English. Luckily I have my neighbor for an English teacher who taught me to write much better grammatically, which helped with my college admission and scholarship essays (and my significantly higher grades than past years, all in the A range including two A+'s).

(I am Japanese-American btw) I think strict teachers that can teach who can be a bit funny sometimes (like my German teacher from last year) are the best.

and still I attend a public high school that is known to be one of the best public schools in the country (top 70 or something like that).
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Feb 23, 2013 4:19 PM

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I used to work as a substitute and I never had any major problems with unruly students. Then again I wasn't teaching grade school or some shit, and the students usually paid attention because they knew what was best for them. Still, if any of them had ever tried to undermine me or my authority, then I wouldn't have hesitated to enforce my own brand of justice and discipline on 'em (which would have probably gotten me fired).

To answer your question: In most cases they probably don't.
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Feb 23, 2013 5:05 PM

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rekindledflame said:
I'm definitely not saying we do not have extended time off, through the year, cause naturally we do, but it really isn't paid time off.
It is exactly paid time off. You have, what, like 2-3 hours a day lecturing, and then office hours. No school over summer vacation or half the month of December. Contrast that with most jobs where they have to work 9-5 over almost the entire year. Your contract of course doesn't specify workdays during the summer, does it?
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Feb 23, 2013 5:06 PM
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JennyEsquire said:
Still, if any of them had ever tried to undermine me or my authority, then I wouldn't have hesitated to enforce my own brand of justice and discipline on 'em (which would have probably gotten me fired).
LOL. Whatever works?
 
Feb 24, 2013 12:32 AM

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It depends on how the teacher acts.
 
Feb 24, 2013 4:24 AM

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katsucats said:
rekindledflame said:
I'm definitely not saying we do not have extended time off, through the year, cause naturally we do, but it really isn't paid time off.
It is exactly paid time off. You have, what, like 2-3 hours a day lecturing, and then office hours. No school over summer vacation or half the month of December. Contrast that with most jobs where they have to work 9-5 over almost the entire year. Your contract of course doesn't specify workdays during the summer, does it?


Not quite. I am there a minimum of six hours per day, but that's a moot point as is, not working in the summer. If you are contracted to work "X" days per month, you are paid for those X days. Days outside of that are irrelevant. This is the same for any salary worker that works via contracts. If you took a contract for some company to work 90 days, and received pay for that 90 days, one would not say they were paid for anything beyond that 90 days.

The 90 days example is valid to my situation. We are contracted per quarter (not yearly) to work X amount of days for which we are paid. Our quarters are split up fairly evenly so you work the same amount of days regardless of the quarter. Summer is the exception, as the summer quarter is shorter, but as an offset to that the classes themselves are longer. At any rate, to get back on track, to answer your question, if I chose to work the summer quarter I would have a contract. If I did not, I would not, the same as any other quarter.

High school and below works differently of course. Where continuing contracts are typically year long one's (quarterly contracts at this level are typically substitute positions). But even then you are contracted to work X days, during the school year. The rest of the year is irrelevant.

 
Feb 24, 2013 8:41 PM

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I give all teachers what i like to call 'default' respect just for choosing that as their occupation/job. I like teaching and considered becoming a teacher, but after seeing what they go through, i'm too wary of the possibilities to even consider it anymore. I'd be that one teacher who tries to back-talk intelligently and have the student just badmouth like a dying animal, then get carded away by police for assaulting and inflicting emotional stress on a student. I can't take the drama, yo.

For teachers to get personal respect from me, i have to like their way of teaching and watch it be a success, even to the most hard-headed students. I know quite a few and respect them a lot, especially when they get the typical crap others get.
Sometimes i thought substitutes had the best job since they didn't have to see those kids every day, but substitutes get even more crap in one day that it still sucks.
Teachers can be nice to their students and be 'cool' rather than a stiff enforcer, but if all they do is let the kids slack off on computers, what's the point of teaching at all? It's similar to how some students come to school and do nothing but cause trouble. Why come at all?

Teaching is a tough job. You have an entire generation's education on your shoulders and have to deal with their crap. I like to give credit where credit is due, even if the teacher is an ass. Chances are they are just sick of our crap and doesn't want to be stepped on.
 
Feb 24, 2013 8:46 PM
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It depends, I give teachers respect on how they teach us/treat us, some deserve it and some dont.
 
Feb 24, 2013 9:19 PM

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In Ontario teachers get better salaries and benefits than deserved, in the opinion of just about everyone who isn't a teacher. Still, I have respect for the vast majority of my past teachers. They were nice people and prepared me well enough for university. Not much else I could've asked for.
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Feb 24, 2013 11:34 PM

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I try my best to respect my teachers, but it becomes tough when they're so bad that me and my friends have to end up teaching them (this seriously happened, in my O'Level year nonetheless). Teachers deserve respect. They spend their their time trying to teach us something. So respect them as teachers. If their personality is bad, then simply don't respect them as a human being.
 
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