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The Decline of Handwriting - Does it matter?

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#1
Aug 29, 2012 7:01 PM

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I'm sure we've all noticed in recent years that technological advances are steadily killing the art of handwriting. Perhaps it is wrong to call handwriting an 'art', but it is unquestionably a skill. But how important is this skill in today's society? How often is it utilised? Instead of writing shopping lists, most people now save them on their phones. E-cards are now gaining in popularity, and many people now prefer using social networking sites and email instead of sending handwritten letters.

Personally, I find handwriting fascinating. I've always been more inclined to write things than to type them, so unsurprisingly the demise of handwriting saddens me. There is so much variety in handwriting and sometimes it can reveal the character of its writer. Typing, I admit, is often more convenient than writing, and this makes me wonder if handwriting will be rendered obsolete in the future. Perhaps the near future, even. It makes me smile when I see people who remain faithful to their trusty fountain pen, or students who choose to write their notes instead of bringing their laptops to lectures.

Getting to the point: Does the decline in handwriting matter? Do you prefer writing or typing? Are there some uses of handwriting that will never be replaced by technology? Do you think handwriting will be rendered obsolete in the future?
 
#2
Aug 29, 2012 7:05 PM

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I was thinking about this the other day, it is unfortunate.

When I write, I'm always at my best when I'm using paper and pen. Something about physically writing is very nice, and somehow a lot more personal, if that makes sense.

And this video is sexy

 
#3
Aug 29, 2012 7:09 PM

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I still prefer the old pen and pencil. My thoughts just flow better when I'm writing on paper.

In my opinion, the pen and paper might be substituted for electronic writing pads but handwriting will never become obsolete.
As a child, I was told that society is a melting pot of talents; knowledge and experience combined to form important alloys that will contribute to mankind. When I got to highschool, however, I thought that it's more like a river in which the water represents our peers while we ourselves are the stones in the river. Constant erosion by mindless majority sheeping has made us lose our unique edge. After I hit the age of 18, I realized that I've been wrong all along. Society is no melting pot. Society is no river. Society is a person, a very skilled rapist, and he has fucked us all.
 
#4
Aug 29, 2012 7:10 PM

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My handwriting sucks, so I prefer to type most things. I like writing kanji/kana though.
 
#5
Aug 29, 2012 7:11 PM

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It's very hard to imagine a society where small children (Preschoolers to maybe 3rd graders) would be using technology to write and what not. I think the decline of handwriting will indeed have an effect on at least the next generation and may close some opportunities towards them. Technology can not always be of use and will never always be something that we can rely on 24/7. Handwriting, however, is. If they're uneducated in this they may lose out on certain things like being able to properly read old documents that were handwritten. While that isn't the best example you can't deny that if they're looking at nearly perfect words and letters all the time that seeing something handwritten may be much more difficult to make out along with understand.

Personally, I prefer typing. It's faster, simpler, and easier. But I'd be nowhere without handwriting. It's a good skill that you need to know if you want to slowly get started on things. Writing rough drafts is much easier to improve on when it's written on paper then typed up first in my opinion. I can't think of any jobs right now that would benefit HW over typing, however if I do I'll be sure to list them.

Considering where we're headed, it's not unlikely that it'll be eliminated for future generations to use, however I doubt this elimination will be absolute. Handwriting will always have to be a resource for children of younger ages and will eventually become a part of our history if it ceases to exist. The ability to handwrite itself may disappear from their times, yes, but it will always be around to influence and show everyone what we had done and even how we may have evolved.

While I don't think HW is the way to go for me, it's a pretty essential stepping stone into the world of knowledge for kids if you ask me.
 
#6
Aug 29, 2012 7:12 PM
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With the increase of technology it'll eventually be rendered useless.
They stopped teaching cursive writing a few years ago because they noticed it took too long for children to learn it and too long for children to be able to write neatly.
Note taking wasn't faster for people who used cursive.

Only time I would need to use cursive is to sign for things, but with the rate technology is going we'll have pieces of hardware that is assigned to us and that will have our signature and such.

Laptops to lectures is more common because it's faster to type than to write. (The keyboard is created in a very logical way, to increase words per minute).
So in a lecture it's better for people to type than to write. I for one have awful writing, and if I had to re-read notes it'd be bad and I may become misinformed (Results in a failure).
So laptops are common in university because they're cheap and more effective than pen and paper.
Pens die out, and you run out of paper. On a laptop your battery runs out; which now in some schools have power outlets + Ethernet to use (my school does each "seat has their own power source+ethernet).

Signing for things is actually slowly becoming less and less frequent, what do you sign? Contracts? Now we have a "click accept" contract we do online. terms & conditions are contracts and we press "Accept" which is our "signature".

Although I write if I need to jot down ideas/thoughts because I cant scribble anywhere on my laptop, or to draw a quick diagram.
 
#7
Aug 29, 2012 7:13 PM

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I type everyday, but I love writing, too, and I hand write everyday (especially since now I'm back in classes). I wish I took a calligraphy class sometime. I'm also in love with my own handwriting.
But I really don't think that it'll ever become "useless" or even fade away, no matter how much technology advances.
 
#8
Aug 29, 2012 7:13 PM

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I definitely prefer typing over writing overall. I type much faster than I write, and have for a long time. Plus, I can type without looking, so it's easier taking notes down from a textbook or presentation or something. I also think it's very useful for reading what other people have written, since some people are absolutely awful at writing.

However, I don't think handwriting will disappear completely, nor would I want it to. Writing is still much more convenient, since you can do it without the need for technology. You can write in the dirt with your finger if you need to (why you would need to, I don't know). Also, even though I type faster, I do like writing things out if I have the time. It makes them easier to remember because I actually have to pay attention to what I'm writing.
 
#9
Aug 29, 2012 7:17 PM

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ihateeveryone said:
While I don't think HW is the way to go for me, it's a pretty essential stepping stone into the world of knowledge for kids if you ask me.


I agree. Though I was rather horrified when I found out my seven-year-old niece uses a computer or laptop for nearly all her subjects. From my teaching experiences at a secondary school, I noticed from marking the students' work that quality in handwriting is declining. The kids were getting away with having atrocious handwriting. I discussed this with some of the other teachers and they were likewise unhappy about this, but couldn't do much about it.

@obbsworld: Love that video. Makes me want to use my fountain pen more.
 
Aug 29, 2012 7:18 PM

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Great video, obbsworld - I think that video shows the subtlety and beauty of penmanship that can't be matched with typing.

I can't see handwriting ever becoming completely obsolete, but I've noticed in recent years I have been writing less and less.
 
Aug 29, 2012 7:24 PM

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I absolutely prefer writing over typing or anything else, but my writing has always been so bad, even though you think it would get neater over time it doesn't so i just use a keyboard haha. I think handwriting will never be forgotten or whatever though because were always going to need peoples signatures for things like money
 
Aug 29, 2012 7:26 PM

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The art of handwriting is caligraphy and it is awesome. Even though my handwriting has always been unreadable to my teachers from a young age I still prefer handwriting over everything. All my notes are hand-written, the individuality and intricate control of your words just isn't there with typing.

I know a lot of stuff is getting digitalised but that distinctive factor given by writing means it will never die.
 
Aug 29, 2012 7:28 PM

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I only handwrite when a keyboard is not available.
 
Aug 29, 2012 7:32 PM

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obbsworld said:
I was thinking about this the other day, it is unfortunate.

When I write, I'm always at my best when I'm using paper and pen. Something about physically writing is very nice, and somehow a lot more personal, if that makes sense.

And this video is sexy


I've never hated my handwriting so much in my life.
I will also never be able to afford that pen.

I agree that handwriting will never completely vanish, but I do find it extremely unfortunate that it's barely covered at all in school anymore. I don't know anyone younger than me that even learned cursive and my own cursive is god-awful because we only covered it in 3rd or 4th grade and I've never had to use it since outside of signing things.

I still like writing some things, but for school I usually use my laptop out of pure convenience for both myself and my instructors.

 
Aug 29, 2012 7:34 PM

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I think that technological advances have had a detrimental effect on two things; the first is the subject of this topic, penmanship, and the second is the art of writing letters.

Personally I am rather proud of my handwriting, which is normally quite neat and easy to read (I think few would struggle to read it- might post some examples tomorrow). Though one problem that I do have with writing is that I am not very consistent and the quality and style of it can vary sometimes. I also have a terrible problems trying to write straight on blank paper, and I end up with a slant. I think this is probably due to leaning on my arm when I write, or from moving it too much.

Letter writing is important too, although it can be typed. A friend and I were discussing this a while ago, and my friend made the observation that (in his opinion) people wrote with much greater clarity in the days before computers. He thought the reason for this was that when writing letters, responding back and forth repeatedly would have been frustrating, and so the need to be clear with what one said was important. In these days of IMs and emails, we can simply respond back to the first party asking them to clarify what they mean. We can also share things like pictures and the like with much greater ease online than we can with letters.

In order to address these two problems (pardon the pun), and since we are both moving away to different countries, my friend and I have decided to start writing to one another. Though with communication through Facebook being only a click or two away, perhaps the irritation of conventional communications will quickly become tiresome. It will be interesting to see, anyway.
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Aug 29, 2012 7:47 PM

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I prefer writing for my math/physics related coursework. I usually have to complete 4-5 assignments (and an occasional lab report) per week. The assignments are quite heavy on notation and symbols, as such I find it extremely difficult to type them out. There are things like MATLAB that are a convenient way to type equations and proofs, but I'm not very good at using such software.

But I prefer typing when there are little to no mathematical symbols involved.
 
Aug 29, 2012 7:49 PM

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AnnoKano said:
Personally I am rather proud of my handwriting, which is normally quite neat and easy to read.


Same. For many years now people have complimented me on my handwriting, saying how artistic it looks. And it does matter to me that it looks artistic. I never planned for it to look that way, but it makes me appreciate handwriting as an artform as well as a skill.

As for letter writing, a friend and I have been writing letters to each other for a few years now. I find that writing letters to her has a rather cathartic effect, and somehow I can express myself much more clearly and honestly than I could if I were to type her an email. It may take longer to handwrite a letter but it gives me great satisfaction once I'm done. Likewise, when I receive letters from my friend its lovely to know that she took the time to write it.

Also there's this old thread where people can post pictures of their handwriting if anyone's interested.
 
Aug 29, 2012 7:52 PM
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My writing is pretty horrible, but not because of lack of practice. I just suck, I guess. I take all of my notes by hand (typing notes is inconvenient and I don't want to stare at a screen all day, since I do a lot of that at home) and most of my assignments are math based, so I do those by hand. Blank paper and pencil for me as well, not a fan of lined paper or pen.

For English course assignments, or anything else that is only written, I type almost everything. I might start by jotting down thoughts, or little blocks of sentences, on blank paper, but nothing beyond that.

To answer one of your questions: I know I personally develop a better understanding of something if I write it out, as opposed to it type out. Thanks to the increased physical stimulation and concentration necessary for writing, I assume. I'm a kinesthetic learner.

This could be grasping at straws, but in terms of auditory and visual learning: the sound of writing and a physical writing surface are more strongly associated with intensive learning in the brain, while typing and computers in general are more associated with leisure and passive learning. If such an effect does exist, it's probably a lot stronger in those who grew up learning everything on paper, as opposed to some kids now. Hopefully that makes some sense, haha.

tl;dr: Writing is better for all three learning styles (Kinesthetic, Auditory, Visual).
Modified by Josh, Aug 29, 2012 8:09 PM
 
Aug 29, 2012 8:27 PM

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i type at like 110wpm
what the hell mannnn i'm so slow

my handwriting is atrocious compared to say my brother's or my mom's but I don't really think it matters too much-I write in shorthand often when attending lectures while my brother takes far less notes than me because he writes slowly


handwriting is certainly useful in some situations
i don't have a particular fascination with it tho
reminds me of fascination with boats (that got replaced by airplanes)
or horses (cars)-wells (water systems) etc.->it'll become old and rarely used soon imo

oh yah thats true PJ brings up a nice point
when I wanted to memorize stuff for AP Chem I would just repeat the problems given to us like 5 times
I'd still fail but it was fairly helpful
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Aug 29, 2012 8:33 PM

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I keep a journal that I write in everyday.

Also, since I'm a maths major in university I just find it easier to handwrite my notes and don't bother bringing a computer with me to school.

I get a lot of compliments on my handwriting.
 
Aug 29, 2012 8:52 PM
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ok Are we saying "WRITING" as in cursive?
or writing as in printing/numbers.
because there's a difference...
Writing in cursive is declined, printing has not.
Mathematics and such all deal with printing/numbers; cursive is handwriting so you couldn't handwrite numbers and signs in the same sense.

Obviously computers can't be used for mat- wait.. yes they can.
In my university we are taught to use a program and we CODE mathematics, regardless of what program you are in, because the world is driven by technology.
So we use like 3 different programs (depending on what degree you are in)
There's one for engineering/science/business.. all that our school has and specializes in (As of now)
But here's the real part of it; a lot of companies would rather you to use excel to submit calculations/such. They don't want hand drawn/written calculations/graphs.
Yes you can use them as scrap if it's easier, but you will have to re-write it into the computer. So our school makes us proficient in computer usage so we don't have to waste time on writing things on paper and have knowledge of the world that is driven by technology.


Personal life example was my interview for working at a pharmacy:
"How fast can you type? Do you know how to use these programs _____ &______"
It was mentioned in my resume; the pharmacist then saw that and said "Nevermind, you over qualify the other applicants."
It's interesting to see that they don't even bother to check peoples' writing, so for work and such you barely write now.

I major in Life Sciences; and during our calculus lectures, I grab a pen and paper to jot down notes. When there's a small break/able to type I go and write it all into the program. In calculus II we had to do the same thing.. but I got so used to the computer; I can type up 3-4 pages of calculations in a shorter time than writing it.
 
Aug 29, 2012 8:58 PM

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@Zanzie: I know there's a difference but I'm talking about writing in general, though perhaps leaning more to cursive. We're just talking pen and paper, not using technology. My degree isn't scientific so I can't really comment on the above I'm afraid.
 
Aug 29, 2012 8:59 PM

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This topic has come up with a lot of my English teachers and almost every single one of them has said that as technology advances, the writing quality of their students has declined. I also favor writing with pen and paper rather then typing but typing is starting to be a requirement in more and more school projects and reports. Even small things such as spell check can rob you of a chance to improve your spelling.
 
Aug 29, 2012 8:59 PM

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I learned how to write cursive in elementary school, but I wish I had stuck to it at that time. Schools don't really make students write in cursive anymore, people have their own handwriting styles with their block letters. (although I don't agree with the "standard" cursive alphabet). It would have helped me since I like to rush my hand writing. Now it just looks like a mix of a bunch of stuff.
I don't really have a strong preference with typing or writing. On one hand, I type faster and neater than I can write, which is convenient for me. On the otherl, typing requires some kind of technology on hand and lugging a laptop for one class isn't for me. The other side to this is I like writing in Chinese and Japanese because it actually means something to me, since it takes somewhat of an effort to write it nicely.

There are definitely uses of handwriting that can't be replaced with technology, but all I can think of is things related to convenience lol. Maybe in bureaucratic situations or when learning a second language. It's not like people carry printers around wherever they go.

Hmm it's hard to imagine handwriting going obsolete since it's not like technology will be affordable to everyone. Handwriting isn't just limited to a ballpoint pen or a number 2 pencil, there are so many other writing utensils out there that I don't think computers will be able to copy. I can't imagine people making a whole poster on a computer if they don't have the resources or the skills to.
 
Aug 29, 2012 9:00 PM

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Yeah, it's pretty sad. I even cringe whenever I see text messages with wrong grammar and spelling, but that's just how it is now.
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Aug 29, 2012 9:00 PM

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Heh, excellent point you bring up.

Although I find texting, emailing and IMing to be more effective means of communication, I find writing is much more useful when the only one who will see it is me; I'm talking about notes or brainstorm maps.

My writing is terrible; it's been called chicken scratch or doctor writing before. I wish I had really nice handwriting, but it's a part of me. Writing does reveal a lot about a person; I'm pretty impatient, and my writing reflects that.

Anywho, I don't think the loss of handwriting is something that you should worry about, seeing as you are clearly a follower of the pen and paper. I find that I cannot learn properly if I use only a computer as a tool whether it's used for typing, reading or whatever else. I don't think handwriting well ever become obsolete in society, it's something that everyone should learn and know.

Side note: Messy writing can be good; consider it encryption that only you can decipher 8)
 
Aug 29, 2012 9:01 PM

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Zanzie said:
hmmm 19 year old finished undergrad and grad and maybe phd? WOW.
 
Aug 29, 2012 9:01 PM

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With the increase of technology, eventually handwriting will indeed be replaced in almost all situations. I think it will remain more as an art form rather than something practical.
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Aug 29, 2012 9:10 PM

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Emotocon said:
I find that I cannot learn properly if I use only a computer as a tool whether it's used for typing, reading or whatever else.


I agree, and with Post-Josh who raised a similar point. If I'm struggling to understand something I'll handwrite it over and over again until its sealed into my memory. Writing forces me to take in what I'm writing.
 
Aug 29, 2012 9:14 PM
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zerotenshigg said:
Zanzie said:
hmmm 19 year old finished undergrad and grad and maybe phd? WOW.

I think you're confused. He's simply in undergrad taking Life Sci, lol. He works at a pharmacy, but is not an actual pharmacist.
 
Aug 29, 2012 9:15 PM

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Post-Josh said:

This could be grasping at straws, but in terms of auditory and visual learning: the sound of writing and a physical writing surface are more strongly associated with intensive learning in the brain, while typing and computers in general are more associated with leisure and passive learning. If such an effect does exist, it's probably a lot stronger in those who grew up learning everything on paper, as opposed to some kids now. Hopefully that makes some sense, haha.


To some extent I get this. For example, if I want to get loads of work done at the library I deliberately sit in the areas where there are no power sockets, therefore no-one using laptops. Its strange, but the sounds of people writing give me the sense that people are working really hard, thus encouraging me to work really hard. But if I need to use the computer room, I just get a sense that everyone's using Facebook and not working at all lol.
 
Aug 29, 2012 9:23 PM

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Allecto said:
Post-Josh said:

This could be grasping at straws, but in terms of auditory and visual learning: the sound of writing and a physical writing surface are more strongly associated with intensive learning in the brain, while typing and computers in general are more associated with leisure and passive learning. If such an effect does exist, it's probably a lot stronger in those who grew up learning everything on paper, as opposed to some kids now. Hopefully that makes some sense, haha.


To some extent I get this. For example, if I want to get loads of work done at the library I deliberately sit in the areas where there are no power sockets, therefore no-one using laptops. Its strange, but the sounds of people writing give me the sense that people are working really hard, thus encouraging me to work really hard. But if I need to use the computer room, I just get a sense that everyone's using Facebook and not working at all lol.


I would believe that. It seems we are very similar in that we are very writing-based learners. I've always been a good memorizer (and it has served me well so far in university); and my 'secret' technique is pretty basic. Just find what you want to memorize it and write it out as many times as necessary until you can do it without the original reference. Combine that with memory aids like acronyms and tables and you can excel in many university level courses.

Edit: Oh, and it goes without saying that this technique is not very effective if you typed it, or just spoke it. The writing seems to lock the content in my brain.
 
Aug 29, 2012 9:28 PM
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I start my day Writing down things, and have felt that using pen and paper helps a lot more than typing.
 
Aug 29, 2012 9:29 PM

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Post-Josh said:
zerotenshigg said:
Zanzie said:
hmmm 19 year old finished undergrad and grad and maybe phd? WOW.

I think you're confused. He's simply in undergrad taking Life Sci, lol. He works at a pharmacy, but is not an actual pharmacist.

My prized Skim read D:
oh well it was to long, but since I'm going down that road it popped out at me....
 
Aug 29, 2012 9:31 PM
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Allecto said:
@Zanzie: I know there's a difference but I'm talking about writing in general, though perhaps leaning more to cursive. We're just talking pen and paper, not using technology. My degree isn't scientific so I can't really comment on the above I'm afraid.



Oh then no, there is no decline. People jot down notes a lot, pens and paper are still being sold.
Computers/technology are out of schools by most school boards. It would pose as a "distraction" and since it's ran by the government, the country shouldn't lose it's standard in the world.
Once you enter a post secondary education it's a different story. So I'd say pen + paper is dead after secondary school.
Pen and paper are mainly used in the education system and for jotting down notes.
Although it is slowly declining because there's only a few "real" reasons to handwrite than to use a computer.
No one sends in documents that are written.. it'd take too long to write everything. It could be messy, the recipient may not be able to read it. Writing takes up more space than typed documents.
I mean.. there's more "Flaws" with writing than with typing. In fact all my assignments are all typed; no written. Same with our quizzes. Our exams are written for obvious reasons.

So what else is there for writing? Signing documents. I covered that with the internet by clicking "Accept" on T&S.

I think handwriting is on the decline is because, technology is becoming more and more efficient.
my brother (an engineer) cannot use pen+paper as a means of calculations/anything is because he may make a mistake on paper that may be illegible for future purposes. Whilst using the computer, if a mistake appears it'll correct you. Or if the # seems wrong you can double check it in the sense where if (my brother) isn't around, anyone can read it and be able to correct it.

@ Kuradachi "since it's not like technology will be affordable to everyone."
Read up on "Moore's Law" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moore's_law
Basically over the years the technology is increased (in development) and becomes cheaper.

I actually make scientific posters; and I cannot do them by hand, it has to be on the computer using software. seeing as anyone in this world who wants to work making posters/images etc, will rely on software. ALTHOUGH that's not writing.. that's drawing, and people do use drawing pads on the computer. So that's a bit different, Drawing won't be able to be replaced.

So to summarize in total:
No decline, only real "Decline" is in the world outside of school. Soon we may not even need to sign for things, but just accept things in person/with a video proof. Or have our licenses/personal ID codes to be as our "signing". So I go do this and I need to sign it'll ask for a license ID, to verify.

Technology is becoming cheaper; Moores law

Even engineers stop using pen+paper to do calculations and such.

But I would like to see an example of where pen+paper couldn't be replaced.

Post-Josh said:
zerotenshigg said:
Zanzie said:
hmmm 19 year old finished undergrad and grad and maybe phd? WOW.

I think you're confused. He's simply in undergrad taking Life Sci, lol. He works at a pharmacy, but is not an actual pharmacist.


Thank you. People think you need to be a pharmacist to work at a pharmacy, as the assistant I'm the one who's using the software to make sure all the supply of medication is in, and also to know what prescription based drugs are in "stock" and how much has been sold and such, basic computing. But imagine doing that by pen and paper? To keep track of all those numbers would be insane.
Modified by Zanzie, Aug 29, 2012 9:36 PM
 
Aug 29, 2012 9:36 PM

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@Zanzie: I need to go away later and read up on all these interesting points you've made. Fascinating, I must say.
 
Aug 29, 2012 9:45 PM

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I'm more concerned about the decline in grammar/vocabulary/use of language. I find keyboard writing easier as most things I would right on paper I will eventually have to type into the computer. As for my handwriting, its not very sophisticated calligraphy wise but at least everyone can read it. I do though admire nice writing and there is a lot you can tell about someone's personality etc from their handwriting...very interesting stuff!
 
Aug 29, 2012 10:00 PM
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The interesting thing is that after not writing for some years, my handwriting had change for the better. Most of us pick up habits of writing at top speed. And when you finally drop those diehard habits, you start to become conscious on how you write in the first place. Ironically, that actually helps me to pick up better writing habits.
 
Aug 29, 2012 10:06 PM
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Zanzie said:
But I would like to see an example of where pen+paper couldn't be replaced.

I wonder what professional writers/poets would have to say. I'm an amateur writer at best, but when I write creative pieces that don't require me to be doing constant research, I much prefer to use paper. There are several advantages that come to mind, such as:

1) There are no distractions, there is no help. One of the biggest arguments against the way the internet generation obtains information is that no one spends enough time on any one idea to truly understand anything. At risk of sounding like an old person, there's nothing quite like one pencil, one paper, and one mind. It's an irreplaceable method of testing and improving upon your own ability to translate thoughts into words.

2) You don't have to write in any particular format; I randomly string words to other words, or other ideas, in a messy flowchart type way.

3) I find not being able to backspace/delete old thoughts (I don't use an eraser or anything) is actually extremely useful. It allows you to follow past trains of thought in an attempt to lead them in new directions, or to understand what you were going for then vs. what you are going for now, among other things.
 
Aug 29, 2012 10:11 PM

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Zanzie said:

But I would like to see an example of where pen+paper couldn't be replaced.


My teacher was talking about this earlier, he was saying how doctors writing all their short hands with their chicken scratch handwriting makes it like its own language. He also said that since phones are becoming quicker to type a message and make it easier by sending it via internet, saves time from going to get it from the mail/doctor in person.

Again skim reading but I'm wholeheartedly agreeing with your views on this subject.
 
Aug 29, 2012 10:12 PM

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iirc poets prefer paper
but writers prefer a comp cause prose writing is longer and all the drafts are pretty rough to handwrite. Writing a 300page book with handwriting burning through 200 drafts handwritten?
oh carpal tunnel come hereeee
~"The place to improve the world is first in one's own heart and head and hands." (Pirsig)

 
Aug 29, 2012 10:37 PM
w i d e f a c e

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Mmm, carpal tunnel. That's definitely true, but maybe part of the first draft? Or just initial ideas/thoughts?
 
Aug 29, 2012 11:04 PM

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Yes, I'm back.

OFF TOPIC:

Handwriting...

Well, mine looks like I'm writing Egyptian hieroglyphs, I got used to writing bad, and I'll write bad for eternity. Thus, I love typing on the computer A LOT more.

I don't know, it looks like we won't be writing by hand in a few years anymore. And I feel that, that's quite bad, even if I'm not helping either.




Autocrat said:
Hitler was good, objectively.
 
Aug 29, 2012 11:24 PM

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I dont think it will be completely obsolete in the future. At least I hope not. I think there are too many circumstances that could pop up and would require one to actually write. That being said, I think it is sad. I look at how people wrote a hundred years ago and wonder what the hell happened...They wrote so beautifully. Same applies to how things are made now. Everything is shitty, falls apart...bad materials, no skill...

Creating anything with our hands is starting to slip. Even going further to the point of making something from scratch doesn't happen too much anymore. An example, I would LOVE to learn how to sheer a few sheep, kneed the wool, spin some yarn and then make whatever out of it.


P.S. Yeah...something that is more than a couple pages long...typing is sooo much better.

 
Aug 29, 2012 11:27 PM

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I absolutely hate writing by hand. Only when I'm typing can I produce written pieces that reflect my potential as a writer. This is why I'm so glad that where I live, my English 12 provincial is online. I dread things like in-class essays.
 
Aug 30, 2012 1:57 AM

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My handwriting is pretty terrible to say the least. It can be so bad that I even have difficulty myself reading it; Often, I attempt to type my assignments rather than hand write them since I rather not get a abysmal grade due to something like handwriting.

Regardless, I still prefer handwriting itself whenever i'm writing a story or such. It makes it feel more....organic I guess? I simply like it more despite the problems associated with my handwriting. That and it gives me a chance to actually practice.

I don't believe handwriting itself will be rendered completely obsolete, but I believe its use will certainly decline over the near future.
 
Aug 30, 2012 2:03 AM
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My handwriting is ugly and I really hate it so type everything I thank technology for the ability to be lazy everyday ... I don't remember the last time I wrote something with a pen or pencil.
 
Aug 30, 2012 3:07 AM
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Why is everybody have terrible handwriting here? Mine is personally good, not particularly amazingly pretty, but still good enough, I think handwriting will always look better than typing (or at least for now) and won't decline for a bit in elementary schools, having said that though, our school decided to use Laptops for every class now, rendering pens and such useless.
 
Aug 30, 2012 3:35 AM

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Karpman said:
Why is everybody have terrible handwriting here? Mine is personally good, not particularly amazingly pretty, but still good enough, I think handwriting will always look better than typing (or at least for now) and won't decline for a bit in elementary schools, having said that though, our school decided to use Laptops for every class now, rendering pens and such useless.

As I've stated in a technical help thread, I've learned to use a computer from early ages. I think that's my reason right there.




Autocrat said:
Hitler was good, objectively.
 
Aug 30, 2012 4:01 AM

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It's more practical to type compared to writing by hand since obvious problems such as writing which is difficult to be read can be avoided. But with the numerous technology available now, people are getting so fucking lazy to even write a sentence. For work purposes, I think typing is more suitable and practical but if it's for something personal such as letters then writing by hand makes it more meaningful.
 
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