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Poll: Angel's Egg Episode 1 Discussion


#1
Feb 12, 2012 10:32 AM
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THIS IS AN ANIME ONLY DISCUSSION POST. DO NOT DISCUSS THE MANGA BEYOND THIS EPISODE.
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The sheer creativity that went into this movie has left me in awe. The visuals may look a bit outdated but "Angel's egg" still surpasses several currently airing anime in this aspect with their inventiveness.

At this point it's up to the viewer how to interprete the events. On the one hand breaking the egg could symbolize the loss of innocence as the girl despairs and evolves into a woman afterwards. On the other hand it could be an indication for enlightenment. The egg was presumably empty and devoid of substance. The transformation from girl to woman is intended to show her pyschological maturation as she becomes aware of the deceit she fell victim to.
This is only one of numerous ways to look at it, of course.
 
#2
May 2, 2012 3:48 AM
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Summary:

Girl takes care of egg

Girl meets man

Man breaks egg

He leaves

She chases

She dies(?)

And I assume she goes on a list of some kind.The list being for previous egg caretakers.

Edit: on the other hand it might not be symbolism and is just there to look cool and set the atmosphere.
The legal age of consent in Japan is 13, so shota is totally legal in Japan. In some western countries shota might be considered child porn.
 
#3
Jun 21, 2012 12:38 AM

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fujifruit said:
Su

Edit: on the other hand it might not be symbolism and is just there to look cool and set the atmosphere.


Knowing Oshii Mamorou, I really doubt that is true. Every scene in every one of his movies is there for a good reason
"...our faces marked by toil, by deceptions, by success, by love; our weary eyes looking still, looking always, looking anxiously for something out of life, that while it is expected is already gone – has passed unseen, in a sigh, in a flash – together with the youth, with the strength, with the romance of illusions.” - Joseph Conrad ('Youth')
 
#4
Jun 22, 2012 7:00 AM

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etto, i don't get it what really happened ?
what is that egg, where they are, and who they are ?
can anyone give a bit explanation to me ?? :/
or i must rewatch it ??
 
#5
Jul 31, 2012 8:49 AM

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That was a really strange piece, one of the most mysterious works I've ever seen. The world of this movie is unknown to us at the beginning of the movie, and yet we know practically nothing more about it after the story ends. The Egg had great value in the eyes of the girl but we can't be sure why. The man wasn't any less mysterious and the aspects of the world shown in the movie were too few to figure anything out.
I like works that require some thinking. Also, the symbols shown in the movie were odd and it really is hard to read the hidden meaning of them.
Overall rating: 3.5/5
 
#6
Oct 27, 2012 8:20 PM

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another nonsense ambiguous religious anime (Christianity in this case)

waste of time /10
 
#7
Nov 2, 2012 2:59 AM
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Too blunt, heavy-handed, and awkward to be interesting as a film or allegory; long takes work in live-action films, in animation, not so much.
 
#8
Nov 10, 2012 2:24 AM

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Excelsior said:
Too blunt, heavy-handed, and awkward to be interesting as a film or allegory; long takes work in live-action films, in animation, not so much.


I disagree: Only Yesterday, Ghost in the Shell movies (especially innocence) and Sky Crawlers are three movies that I liked a lot, and they all had long takes that worked for me perfectly (although SC could be debatable here)
"...our faces marked by toil, by deceptions, by success, by love; our weary eyes looking still, looking always, looking anxiously for something out of life, that while it is expected is already gone – has passed unseen, in a sigh, in a flash – together with the youth, with the strength, with the romance of illusions.” - Joseph Conrad ('Youth')
 
#9
Dec 16, 2012 4:31 PM

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I loved the aesthetics, but i have no idea hope to interpret this movie. Anyone here that can enlighten me?
 
Dec 19, 2012 12:00 AM

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I loved the aesthetics as well. Although it was good, it's way to artsy for me.

The message went over my head.
 
Dec 29, 2012 9:19 PM

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I have no idea if there's any important symbolism in this or if it's just a bunch of atmospheric images/sounds that the creators threw together in the mix. I don't particularly care whether this is pretentious or not... but this movie made me feel good and relaxed at the end. That's good enough for me to consider this "art".

flaxman85 said:
another nonsense ambiguous religious anime (Christianity in this case)

I hardly think they were trying to do a "religious" anime. There's the references, but I don't think they did this to favor any religion.
 
Feb 10, 2013 8:02 AM

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Angel's Egg is symbolic, but I don't think there's a single 'correct' way to interpret the story. My impression was that humanity destroyed itself through war, that the fish represented innocent victims, the tree and dove represented the goodness of humanity, and the egg itself represented sin. In that respect, the ending is actually a positive ending rather than a bad one, and the guy is actually the hero in the story.

There are lots of little details that I still need to piece together, but Angel's Egg seems like a film that is meant to be rewatched and analyzed. It is not a light watch by any means. I'm sure there are plenty of equally valid interpretations as well.
 
Mar 14, 2013 2:25 AM
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Veronin said:
My impression was that humanity destroyed itself through war

I wonder if you were actually paying attention to the movie. Did you forget about the whole Noah's ark and the flood thingy?

Veronin said:
the tree and dove represented the goodness of humanity

The tree is the tree of life (Like in Evengelion, remember?) and the dove is again, related to the Noah's ark thingy.

Stellio said:

In summary, Angel's Egg is a poor parody of the bible with less historical contexts

What the hell?

Stellio said:

Its story board and script should've been reviewed over and added onto before being directed; but the director must've been too anxious to put his directional skills into use that he forgot the rudiments of film making.

Stupidities like these makes me wonder if people like you would say the same thing about the Shakespearean plays if it wasn't because they have a whole apparatus defending them. Seriously, why can't you simply say "I didn't understand a single thing and I have NO IDEA what the movie was about?" instead of spouting that nonsense?

DataRune said:
The message went over my head.

Watch the movie until the very end. Put special attention in the last scene, where the camera is zooming out. What form did you see? Now, remember the whole thing about Noah's Ark and the flood? Now, that's the main message of the movie. Of course there are lots of other important symbolism, but that's the prime meaning of the film. Pretty powerful, I must say.

The interesting thing about the movie is that Oshii even used word plays without the characters saying a word. For example, when the spearmen shadows were hunting the Sarcopterygii genera (by itself a powerful metaphor) remember that the Greek word for "fish" is an anagram/acronym for "Jesus Christ God's Son, Savior" "Ἰησοῦς Χριστός, Θεοῦ Υἱός, Σωτήρ" (Iesous Christos Theou Yios Soter). It's incredible how many people overlook that.
 
Mar 17, 2013 10:25 AM
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NFH said:
Veronin said:
My impression was that humanity destroyed itself through war

I wonder if you were actually paying attention to the movie. Did you forget about the whole Noah's ark and the flood thingy?

Veronin said:
the tree and dove represented the goodness of humanity

The tree is the tree of life (Like in Evengelion, remember?) and the dove is again, related to the Noah's ark thingy.

Stellio said:

In summary, Angel's Egg is a poor parody of the bible with less historical contexts

What the hell?

Stellio said:

Its story board and script should've been reviewed over and added onto before being directed; but the director must've been too anxious to put his directional skills into use that he forgot the rudiments of film making.

Stupidities like these makes me wonder if people like you would say the same thing about the Shakespearean plays if it wasn't because they have a whole apparatus defending them. Seriously, why can't you simply say "I didn't understand a single thing and I have NO IDEA what the movie was about?" instead of spouting that nonsense?


I like how you're just quoting the parts that wouldn't make sense without the entire post, so then you wouldn't have to refute their entire statements. Go back to /b/ you fakefag. Stop pretending like you're smart just because you know Shakespeare

fujifruit said:
Summary:

Girl takes care of egg

Girl meets man

Man breaks egg

He leaves

She chases

She dies(?)

And I assume she goes on a list of some kind.The list being for previous egg caretakers.

Edit: on the other hand it might not be symbolism and is just there to look cool and set the atmosphere.


See, I'm quoting the whole thing, and to which degree I can say I agree fully.
 
Apr 12, 2013 4:04 PM

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I really, really enjoyed this. I honestly didn't understand everything I saw, but I think that's okay as this seems to be a film that is meant to be re-watched. Some interesting theories in here , I suppose I'll have to mull over this for a while.
"Yes, I have been deprived of emotion. But not completely. Whoever did it, botched the job."

- Geralt of Rivia
 
May 8, 2013 1:58 PM

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Amazing scenery and the accompanying music has impact and lacks the typical "cheesy" feel I tend to get from most 80's anime.

The story however...gonna need a rewatch or two. Mainly to figure out what the hell is with that giant eye ball ship that adds souls of the dead to its hull. I mean, what the hell is that about?
 
Jul 1, 2013 6:16 PM

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To everyone who doesn't get it, I'll explain what I think everything symbolized.

Everything that is going on is explained by him when he talks with her in that necrohol. He talks about how he doesn't remember who he is and she doesn't either. He talks about how Noah sent out a dove and it never returned and says that maybe it is because it exhausted itself and dropped dead in the water. That eventually all the animals on the ship got so old that they turned to stone. Then the people remaining on the ship forgot who they were and where they were going.

At the beginning and end of the film, there are the statues. At the end we see that the girl has become one and can assume that the other statues were living people, too. This fits into his story of all the animals turning to stone from age.

They are carried into the sky away from the world that is flooded except for one tiny island. The thing that carried these statues is vaguely egg shaped and is probably where the title name comes from. It is an egg that takes humanity to heaven, even if they've all turned to stone.

I also think the giant dead bird was supposed to be Noah's dove and that the young man was Noah. When she shows him the dead bird you can see he is distressed. His attitude towards the egg before and after seeing the bird skeleton changes, too. Before he sees it, he tells her to take care of the egg if she treasures it, afterward he tells her that the sound of its wings is the wind and things that suggest that the egg is empty.

I'm still not 100% certain on the dove/Noah thing and I don't understand what the tree, the fishermen, the tank, or the shadow fish meant, so if someone could tell me that, that would be cool.

I hope that helped some people, though. I wish I could explain it better, but I'm a better speaker than writer.
 
Jul 5, 2013 12:56 AM

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I was reading "Mamoru Oshii: Stray Dog of Anime" and the book explains what Oshii was going for. The whole film was about faith.

Oshii was raised in a Christian background, but growing up he admitted to being irreligious.

The Girl represented religion in general. The Soldier represented atheism.

The egg was a symbol for both parties.

The Girl lived in delusion with her beliefs by not wanting to break the egg and reveal the horrible truth. The Soldier tried to talk the Girl out of her beliefs and wake her up to reality. If you remember in their dialogue as she cuddled the egg, believing that something was breathing and moving inside, the Solider kept telling her that it was her own breathing and that the movement was that of the wind.

The Soldier himself has bandages around both his palms and carries a weapon shaped like a crucifix.

Also, there's sexual themes involved. Not only is the egg breaking and the Girl's reaction to it a symbol of waking up to the truth at last, but her transformation into a woman through the weapon's penetration of the egg represents the loss of her virginity.
I know Kung-Food!
 
Jul 25, 2013 11:48 AM

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"The neat thing about art works like this is that they are open. The viewer takes the imagery and mixes it with, hopefully, his deepest preoccupations and constructs the ghost of a narrative. If the imagery is compelling enough, that personally-grounded proto-story will surface and solidify with time, and become very moving to the viewer, if only in memory."

Exactly how I view Angel's Egg. It's ambiguous enough that your deepest desires become flavored into the work.
 
Nov 23, 2013 9:59 AM
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It's trying too hard to be deep, even though it isn't. 5/10 visuals were pretty good considering how old it is.
 
Dec 11, 2013 6:41 PM
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NimbusC said:
I was reading "Mamoru Oshii: Stray Dog of Anime" and the book explains what Oshii was going for. The whole film was about faith.

Oshii was raised in a Christian background, but growing up he admitted to being irreligious.

The Girl represented religion in general. The Soldier represented atheism.

The egg was a symbol for both parties.

The Girl lived in delusion with her beliefs by not wanting to break the egg and reveal the horrible truth. The Soldier tried to talk the Girl out of her beliefs and wake her up to reality. If you remember in their dialogue as she cuddled the egg, believing that something was breathing and moving inside, the Solider kept telling her that it was her own breathing and that the movement was that of the wind.

The Soldier himself has bandages around both his palms and carries a weapon shaped like a crucifix.

Also, there's sexual themes involved. Not only is the egg breaking and the Girl's reaction to it a symbol of waking up to the truth at last, but her transformation into a woman through the weapon's penetration of the egg represents the loss of her virginity.

Happy to finally see that a lot of what I had in mind during the years after seeing the film was actually really close to what Oshii was conveying.

Most of the interpretations I have read about the movie usually render the man as a soldier, but unthinking, just following orders. I always thought him as a primordial warrior - seeking truth.

Though the faith part is obvious, I like how the movie can be interpreted even from a point different than religion. It's truly a timeless masterpiece.
 
Feb 14, 2014 12:33 AM
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Wind_Falcon said:

Happy to finally see that a lot of what I had in mind during the years after seeing the film was actually really close to what Oshii was conveying.

I'm sorry to tell you this but what's in that book is merely an essay made by the author, Brian Ruh. Oshii had absolutely nothing to do with it.
We may never know what Oshii was trying to convey since he himself has admitted that a good part of the movie's meaning is highly private, so he has never explained what the heavy symbolism and allegories presented meant. The best we could do if we want to know what Oshii was thinking is to try to guess, like Brian Ruh did in his book.

buunny said:

They are carried into the sky away from the world that is flooded except for one tiny island.

buunny, that wasn't an island. Re-watch the last scene, when the camera is zooming out, and tell me: what does the "island" looks like?
I have found that the vast majority of people who are absolutely lost in what the movie is about are the ones who missed that last shot.
 
Feb 19, 2014 1:51 AM
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Thanks for clarifying that NFH.

Though I still think this interpretation is close to what Oshii was going for (no small part because mine being a similar one :D), having in mind the whole movie, every scene and symbolism, and his biography.

Of course, I can see why people might not agree with this (I don't agree with some of Brian Ruh's points too), but I think this is a plus for the movie - unlike so many masterpieces, it hasn't been spoiled by the creator explaining it (in an interview or something...) necessarily (because he is already giving his most subjective view of the matter with the movie itself).

Either way, I think that while the movie is up for interpretation, there is more than enough given to us to piece Oshii's intended meaning. Which is more obvious, I think, than some people make it out to be. One of the reasons being the mentioned by you last scene, together with the previous ones (fish shadows...) I think shed the biggest light on what point of view we should assume when making our interpretations. And from there, things fall in place pretty obviously (because the different scenes reinforce each other, so it's hard to stray from their conveyed meaning). Though all that hasn't stopped people from making wildly different personal interpretations. I guess this is best part about the movie, you can take something away from it, even if it wasn't exactly what the director was conveying. And yes, we'll never know for sure what that something really is.
Modified by Wind_Falcon, Feb 19, 2014 3:34 AM
 
Apr 26, 2014 4:56 AM
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What an amazing piece of cinematic art. It was a truly intense sensorial experience. And that ending leaves a lot u to the viewer to interpret. I'd love to watch it again and see what I can get from it.
"Perhaps there is a universal, absolute truth. Perhaps it justifies every question. But that's beyond the reach of these small hands." Mamoru Oshii

There is a cult of ignorance (...) nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that “my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.” Isaac Asimov

 
Apr 26, 2014 4:32 PM

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I saw this at an anime convention. Everyone was surprised.
Really a stunning classic.
 
Jul 22, 2014 12:25 AM

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Very good movie considering how old it is. I would definitely recommend it to anyone. Even if the pacing was very slow they made up for it with a stunning and surreal atmosphere. Studio Deen managed to impress me.

As everyone, I have my own interpretations of the symbolisms. I believe that prior to the film a war had happened and the boy was one of the soldiers. Its Cross-shaped weapon maybe implies that the war was a religious one. I think that the girl is the only survivor of that war and that the egg symbolises the Hope for a new beginning. The story of Noah and the Ark seemed more like a metaphor to me about the current state of the world in the film (Noah=the only survivor=girl and cataclysm=war)
 
Aug 22, 2014 9:08 PM

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I seriously enjoyed this... it's like an animated painting!
It's definetley the type of movie that will have you thinking for days!
10/10 ♥
 
Aug 30, 2014 6:37 PM

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The movie is essentially a big Rorschach test; everyone's gonna get something different out of its minimalist and elliptical style, that's not to say it 100% has no meaning really. Suffice to say the visuals are purely incredible, so I can't see that being hated at the very least.
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"Technology can't bellydance." --VentusCross, January 2nd, 2014

 
Sep 16, 2014 11:20 PM
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I really enjoyed this movie. 10/10 for pure enjoyment's sake, depth of meaning, and artwork. I guess I'll toss my own interpretation up here since everyone else is.

Disclaimer first off that I'm not religious personally; I just study it and think Christianity has a lot of significance in the story.

Before going into the meaning of the characters, I think I'll stick to pointing out the more religious symbols first off. Let's look at the fish shadows. Fish are a symbol in Christianity that directly refer to Jesus Christ. In the movie, we see the shadows of fish moving all along the buildings and roads at certain points in time, at which point men come to try and skewer them. The girl explains that the fish are long since dead, but they still chase after and attack them. This, I believe, is a reference to the crucification of Jesus, his rebirth, and the Second Coming. After he was said to have resurrected, he showed himself before various people for 40 days before rising to Heaven. There is a belief that he will rise again, called the Second Coming, which some branches of Christianity associate with an apocalypse where the sinners and believers are separated and given their final judgments. This story is clearly post-apocalyptic (even without the environment, the references to Noah's Ark should do it), so I believe it took place after the Second Coming and that the fish represent Jesus and God's other children visiting and judging those who are still alive.

All of the people on that world, I believe, have lost their memories like the main characters. Everyone forgot their past lives and were stripped down to their souls for evaluation following the Second Coming, and each of the lead characters has their role in this. The men attacking the fish would be the sinners. The main boy in this, despite being a soldier, would be less of a sinner and more of a virtuous atheist - a representation of those who aren't religious and cannot go to Heaven but, at the same time, are not terrible sinners. (Compare it to the people left in Limbo in Dante's Inferno.) He has accepted that he won't be going to Heaven but isn't so mindless that he'd go attacking anything in rage. He actually helps the girl out... but how? What about that girl and the egg and the people who go to Heaven?

Let's start with the bird (there's some assumption in this part). In many tales of the Second Coming, there is a belief that, prior to Jesus appearing, an impostor borne from the sins of men would attempt to take his role as a false prophet, some saying it may even be the Devil himself or even Satan. Seeing as there's a big monologue given about it, I believe the bird is Moses' dove which drowned and then was possessed. It became a symbol to the people, but it was not the true bird and couldn't deliver Moses' message properly, forcing Jesus to turn his hand. The arrival of the fish lead to the demise of the bird, and the egg was the manifestation of its sins - however, no other bird was within it. The girl is a symbol of the virtuous Christian populace as a whole. Her child form and Aryan design imply purity, and her love for the egg is a show of her devotion and faith. She didn't know that the bird was fake or that the egg was so poisonous. She held on to her belief that everything would be alright when it hatched.

The boy at first thought this display of faith was a sure sign that she would go to Heaven. Let's take a quick look at some other things here, though, such as the fact that they were clearly on a time constraint. This was shown through the frequent hours passing by on the clocks. Many of the still images inbetween the scenes had significance, but none moreso than when they showed the building with the clock up top and two streets diverging on either side of it. This was a literal crossroad of time and symbolized a decision to be made on a time limit. I believe the boy was aware of this. Although he couldn't go to Heaven himself, he was acting as a messenger to help the girl get there and was concerned since the girl was the only believer any of us saw alive in the story. When he saw the fake bird, he knew for sure the egg was bad news and broke it to free her from her misplaced faith.

She was so distraught by the loss of her egg that, despite her faith, she proceeded to try to kill herself... But instead, the water purified her (probably in adoration for that blind but misguided faith), showing her the wrongs she'd done and allowing her to mature into her faith in a new light. All of her sins rose to the surface in the form of new eggs, and the body of her child form turned to stone and was put aboard the airship we see at the end. The people who are turned to stone represent the believers' sinful states (hence why she's young and still has the egg on the ship) with their now purified souls on board safely within the statues, and the ship is the angel (implied by all the feathers around it) delivering them to Heaven to be judged the second time. Her adult body, I believe, was the true body that she would have been the whole time had she not childishly held onto her faith. I think Oshii was making a statement on that note about people in general who blindly believe what they dream up when they can't know if it's good or bad unless they "break" it - look at it from a new point of view that could ruin the faith and good they have going now.

Frankly, I believe the boy may have symbolized Oshii in general, or at least was a way of showing the place he'd be in if all these things did happen. I unfortunately do struggle a bit to back that up since I otherwise think racism had a big part in the boy's design (the pure blonde white girl going up to heaven and the angry black guy stuck on Earth for being atheistic, in a movie made decades ago by a Japanese man... right), which makes it seem like the boy should be seen more negatively than he is.

I also believe there are a ton of double meanings to everything (like the egg being broken being compared to a loss of virginity, for a popular example), and though the story is religious in nature, it seems to have a lot of jabs at faith and Christianity. Even with the people turning to stone, it gives the impression that going to Heaven isn't as pleasant as they may have made it out to be. Sure, you won't have to deal with the crazy demon sinners or the lack of food and clean water those who're left on the apocalyptic arc have to, and you may be surrounded by great people, beautiful places, good food, etc., but you have no free will to move your body as you want. You're now just statues for God to gaze upon unless he deems you worthy of living as just your soul. I suppose that could be taken a few different ways.

Definitely a good read. Lots of different ways to interpret it. If you watch it for anything, though, do it for the art and animation. Mmm.
Modified by BarabiSama, Sep 16, 2014 11:26 PM
 
Dec 4, 2014 9:10 PM

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I simply love the artwork, it's blunt at some points which makes a heavy atmosphere, and I think it's a good point.
I'll leave here my thoughts.

It's clear after seeing the last scene that they [still?] ARE in the ark, about the birdmankind skeleton, I don't think it's the dove that Noah freed to search for land, since it's said that the bird never came back. Is the man god? Regarding the bandage in his hands and the cross he carries everywhere. Is he testing humanity's faith [figured by the egg]? Which means that he has been testing all those people that turned into stone. Is that a type of selection to take people to heaven? [through the 'spaceship' or angel's egg, as you prefer]idk, it just came in my head while I was typing lol
Well, previous comments shows better the point of view [which is mine too] about the girl and her faith, and the crack of the egg involving the lost of innocence.

But I don't have a clue about the fish shadows and the tanks of the first man appearance, but I'm more curious about the shadows, I would really like to know the meaning :/

I wasn't going to comment here, when I finished the film I didn't understand so much, but it stayed in my head and things started enlightening :P
 
Dec 13, 2014 7:40 PM

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May 11, 2015 9:41 PM

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One of the most unique and beautiful anime experiences I ever had.I liked the symbolism and have some theories here and there but I'll simply rewatch it soon to make my own interpretation.
 
May 26, 2015 1:12 AM

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This is too deep for me also the symbolism is almost impossible to understand because of my ignorance in Christian mythology .
 
Jun 1, 2015 11:26 PM
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BarabiSama said:
I really enjoyed this movie. 10/10 for pure enjoyment's sake, depth of meaning, and artwork. I guess I'll toss my own interpretation up here since everyone else is.

Disclaimer first off that I'm not religious personally; I just study it and think Christianity has a lot of significance in the story.

Before going into the meaning of the characters, I think I'll stick to pointing out the more religious symbols first off. Let's look at the fish shadows. Fish are a symbol in Christianity that directly refer to Jesus Christ. In the movie, we see the shadows of fish moving all along the buildings and roads at certain points in time, at which point men come to try and skewer them. The girl explains that the fish are long since dead, but they still chase after and attack them. This, I believe, is a reference to the crucification of Jesus, his rebirth, and the Second Coming. After he was said to have resurrected, he showed himself before various people for 40 days before rising to Heaven. There is a belief that he will rise again, called the Second Coming, which some branches of Christianity associate with an apocalypse where the sinners and believers are separated and given their final judgments. This story is clearly post-apocalyptic (even without the environment, the references to Noah's Ark should do it), so I believe it took place after the Second Coming and that the fish represent Jesus and God's other children visiting and judging those who are still alive.

All of the people on that world, I believe, have lost their memories like the main characters. Everyone forgot their past lives and were stripped down to their souls for evaluation following the Second Coming, and each of the lead characters has their role in this. The men attacking the fish would be the sinners. The main boy in this, despite being a soldier, would be less of a sinner and more of a virtuous atheist - a representation of those who aren't religious and cannot go to Heaven but, at the same time, are not terrible sinners. (Compare it to the people left in Limbo in Dante's Inferno.) He has accepted that he won't be going to Heaven but isn't so mindless that he'd go attacking anything in rage. He actually helps the girl out... but how? What about that girl and the egg and the people who go to Heaven?

Let's start with the bird (there's some assumption in this part). In many tales of the Second Coming, there is a belief that, prior to Jesus appearing, an impostor borne from the sins of men would attempt to take his role as a false prophet, some saying it may even be the Devil himself or even Satan. Seeing as there's a big monologue given about it, I believe the bird is Moses' dove which drowned and then was possessed. It became a symbol to the people, but it was not the true bird and couldn't deliver Moses' message properly, forcing Jesus to turn his hand. The arrival of the fish lead to the demise of the bird, and the egg was the manifestation of its sins - however, no other bird was within it. The girl is a symbol of the virtuous Christian populace as a whole. Her child form and Aryan design imply purity, and her love for the egg is a show of her devotion and faith. She didn't know that the bird was fake or that the egg was so poisonous. She held on to her belief that everything would be alright when it hatched.

The boy at first thought this display of faith was a sure sign that she would go to Heaven. Let's take a quick look at some other things here, though, such as the fact that they were clearly on a time constraint. This was shown through the frequent hours passing by on the clocks. Many of the still images inbetween the scenes had significance, but none moreso than when they showed the building with the clock up top and two streets diverging on either side of it. This was a literal crossroad of time and symbolized a decision to be made on a time limit. I believe the boy was aware of this. Although he couldn't go to Heaven himself, he was acting as a messenger to help the girl get there and was concerned since the girl was the only believer any of us saw alive in the story. When he saw the fake bird, he knew for sure the egg was bad news and broke it to free her from her misplaced faith.

She was so distraught by the loss of her egg that, despite her faith, she proceeded to try to kill herself... But instead, the water purified her (probably in adoration for that blind but misguided faith), showing her the wrongs she'd done and allowing her to mature into her faith in a new light. All of her sins rose to the surface in the form of new eggs, and the body of her child form turned to stone and was put aboard the airship we see at the end. The people who are turned to stone represent the believers' sinful states (hence why she's young and still has the egg on the ship) with their now purified souls on board safely within the statues, and the ship is the angel (implied by all the feathers around it) delivering them to Heaven to be judged the second time. Her adult body, I believe, was the true body that she would have been the whole time had she not childishly held onto her faith. I think Oshii was making a statement on that note about people in general who blindly believe what they dream up when they can't know if it's good or bad unless they "break" it - look at it from a new point of view that could ruin the faith and good they have going now.

Frankly, I believe the boy may have symbolized Oshii in general, or at least was a way of showing the place he'd be in if all these things did happen. I unfortunately do struggle a bit to back that up since I otherwise think racism had a big part in the boy's design (the pure blonde white girl going up to heaven and the angry black guy stuck on Earth for being atheistic, in a movie made decades ago by a Japanese man... right), which makes it seem like the boy should be seen more negatively than he is.

I also believe there are a ton of double meanings to everything (like the egg being broken being compared to a loss of virginity, for a popular example), and though the story is religious in nature, it seems to have a lot of jabs at faith and Christianity. Even with the people turning to stone, it gives the impression that going to Heaven isn't as pleasant as they may have made it out to be. Sure, you won't have to deal with the crazy demon sinners or the lack of food and clean water those who're left on the apocalyptic arc have to, and you may be surrounded by great people, beautiful places, good food, etc., but you have no free will to move your body as you want. You're now just statues for God to gaze upon unless he deems you worthy of living as just your soul. I suppose that could be taken a few different ways.

Definitely a good read. Lots of different ways to interpret it. If you watch it for anything, though, do it for the art and animation. Mmm.


This is pretty much it. Quite a tragic movie.
 
Jul 1, 2015 5:40 PM

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This was a very bleak, confusing OVA. I didn't really understand much about it, and the only interesting thing about it was the art and animation.

 
Jul 16, 2015 5:03 PM

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love it, the ending was WOW!!
 
Aug 10, 2015 10:58 PM

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A scene I find really interesting is the one at around 30 minutes into the movie.

It happens during the fish-hunt of the fisherman.

The girl is walking into the building that looks kinda like a church.

From the inside it looks more like an abandonded theatre though.



In that "theatre" is this colorful lead glass window you would normally find in a church and it has the form of a fish , just like the ones the fisherman are hunting.But this one is shining and probably the only thing in this world that is really bright in colors.


(it's shining once she gets closer to it)

When the girl sees the window she is just standing there , seemingly perplexed and it looks like she is experiencing something spiritual , the music and lightning surrounding her emphasises this.



If you look closely , the girl is now colored in the same monotonous blue as the fisherman and the chessboard imagery from the very beginning of the movie reappers.

Once the girl climbs up the stairs and stands right in front of the window , it's (iirc) the first time she sees a mirror image of herself.And her reflection is colored in blue a little bit just like at her "death"(?) near the end.
Also it's worth mentioning that she touches the window.The fisherman are hunting an illusion of god in need of something tangible while the girl finds something she can touch.



And when the girls looks outside of the window , there is instantly a black fish over the window but you don't see it from inside the theatre nor does the girl seems to recognize it from the window.
She also sees the Man standing there.



I really find it interesting that Mamoru Oshii chose to make the church seem like a theatre where the girl encounters a deity (?).

Maybe that's his way of saying that he found his own/new god or believe in the cinema and it's the first time that he reflected on his life and blind faith maybe?In a way it could be that both the man and the girl are representing Oshii at different times and that was the first step that lead him into a certain direction.

Also it's important to think at what time in the movie this scene takes place , it's during the fish-hunt and maybe that's how Oshii felt that all these people around him were trying to find something tangible in their believe while he found his own truth in the cinema.But I'm not sure.This just poped into my mind while looking for a wallpaper.Not sure if it's worth thinking about but I needed to write it down and considering the background of Oshii maybe , just maybe , it's not completly "wrong".
Modified by _HeroKenzan_, Aug 11, 2015 1:14 AM
 
Aug 14, 2015 8:47 AM
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Just rewatched this, always beautiful.
 
Sep 16, 2015 6:20 AM

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Thank you for the explanations guys :) i loved this movie, definitely worth a rewatch
 
Oct 28, 2015 11:17 PM

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So the question is... If the island is bottom of the hull of Noah's Ark, are we seeing the Ark overturned or is it right side up and the world we saw is actually "underwater"? o__O

Not sure what that would mean, but it's got me scratching hairs off my head.
 
Jan 29, 2016 11:41 AM

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What a movie.

The symbolism was just so beautifully portrayed in this that I had myself thinking more about it than paying attention to whatever minimal character dialogue there was.

Truly beautiful!
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Feb 14, 2016 5:11 PM

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In listening to the music from this film, I am reminded of Olivier Messiaen's "Catalogue d'Oiseaux". Full of atonal and avant-guarde modern interpretations. Much like the film itself, its interpretation seems to require an eccentric mind to comprehend.
 
Mar 4, 2016 6:24 AM

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I watched it.
I don't understand it.
I still enjoyed it.

What a piece of art, and exactly as the reviews state, this movie is how you make it out to be, it's all down to your own interpretation. The music and animation also stood out a lot to me, in particular the animation. Can't believe it was released in 1985, it looks better than 95% of the anime today..
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Mar 16, 2016 8:24 PM

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This movie is really hard to watch when you are half asleep. Ahahah

This movie had a lot of symbolism, about faith in God, I believe. I'll definitely need to rewatch it sometime.
Either way, I can say for certain that the art and scenery of this film was beautiful. Such an eery, somber atmosphere. I love it.
Life has meaning.
 
Mar 28, 2016 4:45 PM

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Its a nice movie with an interesting message but from a film-making point of view some of the shots were like really long. E.g that one where the man is sitting in front of the girl who is alseep and just waits for 3 minutes or something. There were a few other like this, I think the film would have worked better if it had been shortened to 60 mins.
The art was really nice though as well as the music.
I've been here way too long...
 
May 2, 2016 6:31 AM

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What a scary ost to start with , well it put u on mood.
lol no dialog until like middle of movie.

 
May 31, 2016 8:20 AM
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I think that the egg represents hope.
The boy destroys the egg because the girl has been hanging on the same hope for so long, she would have live for the rest of her with a false belief.
The boy, by breaking the egg, "releases" her from that false hope, hoping for the girl to begin a new life.
But what happens is that by releasing her from one hope, she begins to hope for OTHER things.
but notice how when she drowns, the eggs stay afloat, signifying that even if she dies, her hopes may live on. Regardless of how true those belief are.
The boy doesnt have hopes, just living aimlessly, but accepting things how he sees them.
Ergo, the message may be that -hope and humanity- coexist in a greater whole. Hope can push people to do things, but relying on that hope too strongly can imprison you into a life of masochistic beliefs, becoming a slave to that Hope of a life that may never come.
(Also notice how the girl smile a lot as long as she has her hope/egg? While the boy acts neutral without giving in to his sorrow?)

This was my 2 cents.overall I say this movie can make you think if you let it, but I wouldnt say it "entertaint" me. The visuals are nice, but feels unfinished, like a college project.
 
Jun 18, 2016 1:19 PM

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I've cracked the code. Haven't read anything on this movie yet, aside from back and forth banter of "It doesn't mean anything!" and "It does mean something!" so here's my (very short) interpretation.
All the people who think Angel's Egg doesn't mean anything should actually be the people who most relate to the girl.
By that, I mean that those viewer's probably went into this movie expecting to find some message of worth. They trusted the movie not to waste their time, to provide something meaningful - but found nothing. The pretty art and gripping atmosphere is just a shallow veil to cover up the hollow void that is this movie. (Not that I think this.) They are the girl, and Angel's Egg is their egg. The girl, similarly, blindly believes in the egg's worth, carrying it around - it gives her purpose, prevents her from turning into stone. Yet when her trust is disillusioned, when the egg - the thin shell - is broken, there is nothing inside. A waste of time. A waste of her life. What else, then, would she do, but despair? The egg was just a dream.
There's more I could say, but explaining Angel's Egg like this is the funniest way to do it lmao
 
Jun 19, 2016 8:57 AM

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Partyu said:
I've cracked the code. Haven't read anything on this movie yet, aside from back and forth banter of "It doesn't mean anything!" and "It does mean something!" so here's my (very short) interpretation.
All the people who think Angel's Egg doesn't mean anything should actually be the people who most relate to the girl.
By that, I mean that those viewer's probably went into this movie expecting to find some message of worth. They trusted the movie not to waste their time, to provide something meaningful - but found nothing. The pretty art and gripping atmosphere is just a shallow veil to cover up the hollow void that is this movie. (Not that I think this.) They are the girl, and Angel's Egg is their egg. The girl, similarly, blindly believes in the egg's worth, carrying it around - it gives her purpose, prevents her from turning into stone. Yet when her trust is disillusioned, when the egg - the thin shell - is broken, there is nothing inside. A waste of time. A waste of her life. What else, then, would she do, but despair? The egg was just a dream.
There's more I could say, but explaining Angel's Egg like this is the funniest way to do it lmao


really close...been years since I saw the movie, but my take on the movie was really close to this. I also remember there were some people with harpoons trying desperately to hunt and kill the shadow whale swimming on the walls and the street...their obsession with the whale gained them nothing, and all their efforts only led to vandalism and destruction.
"...our faces marked by toil, by deceptions, by success, by love; our weary eyes looking still, looking always, looking anxiously for something out of life, that while it is expected is already gone – has passed unseen, in a sigh, in a flash – together with the youth, with the strength, with the romance of illusions.” - Joseph Conrad ('Youth')
 
Jul 6, 2016 8:02 PM

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i love anime like serial experiments lain and ergo proxy, but this anime is the most pretentious thing i've seen in a very long time.
 
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