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Sep 7, 2010 1:04 PM

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Haha, np :)

Most people stop after the first volume of RTK because after that you can learn new kanjis that you encounter in real life with the same way you construct a meaningful story in the later parts of RTK vol 1. If you want to go through vol.2 and 3, it's up to you. Volume 2 explain readings of kanjis though. Volume 3 expand on volume 1, meaning it contains only kanji's meaning and writing.

Feel free to do #4 at any time you want. That will be the meat of your Japanese. Just don't be afraid to not know some Japanese.
 
Sep 29, 2010 12:09 PM
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Hey firebound, or someone else... ;) When you did/do your flashcards for SRSing about Remembering the Kanji did you use the stories as questions and answers? I didn't but I don't know if it's better to have them as a reference or something cause sometimes you can forget the story about some kanji and that way you could see it straightaway.

I would love to have them but only as a reference, not as a question or answer, just to refresh your memory when you are recognizing/writing kanji. How did you manage this?

Cheers.
 
Sep 29, 2010 4:00 PM

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Back then, I only put the kanji and meaning as questions and answers!

However, it's really up to you if you want to 1)put it in the question/answer (I would prefer in answer, but everything is up to you really :P)

To have them as reference somewhere... Well you can use 2)kanji koohii like I said before for the stories you created yourself, for example: http://kanji.koohii.com/study/kanji/1632 . To save your stories, you'll have to sign up :P

That, or you'll be able to 3)make new and better fitting stories of the same kanji as it goes... It's not like the story you choose must be the same forever.

Or else just 4)write it down somewhere, like a word document o.O.

It all depends on what kind of resources you have at your disposal, and which you want to use :)
 
Sep 29, 2010 11:23 PM
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ok firebound, once again thank you

that site you put is great...
 
Oct 16, 2010 8:13 PM

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Hey guys! just putting up a link that helped me in my Japanese. It helped a lot so try it out if you want. http://nihongoup.com/?referrer=Kenny


 
Oct 27, 2010 2:03 PM

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I was looking through one of the lessons on nihongoup.com -- The Japanese in it sounds really odd to me. Do you know who makes the lessons?
 
Nov 8, 2010 11:45 AM

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Is there any difference in pronunciation between ず and づ ?
 
Nov 8, 2010 2:29 PM

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in standard dialect there's no difference. Heard it was different for other dialect. However, those two aren't interchangeable.

i.e. the verb 続く (つづく) cannot be written つずく even if they have the same pronunciation.
 
Nov 8, 2010 9:58 PM

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Ah, I get it. thanks.
 
Nov 18, 2010 4:38 AM

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However づ is quite rare. You can safely use ず most of the time and just learn the exceptions in time. Quite similarly to おお and おう.

(sorry if you knew that already)
 
Nov 20, 2010 1:38 AM

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I don't know if づ is necessarily that rare. I mean, in terms of coming up in lots and lots of words, maybe づ is rare in that case. But, you'll frequently need it for つづく 【続く】. Especially as an auxiliary verb.

Anyways, my advice for knowing when to use which is to learn the spelling of the words to learn that use either ず or づ. As far as pronunciation, I know of no difference. As firebound12 said, it's likely that other dialects make a distinction, but the standard dialect doesn't as far as I can tell.

If you think about it, knowing when to use ず or づ is like knowing that "you" is spelled with a O and U and "too" is spelled with two O's. Same sound, different letter.
 
Mar 21, 2011 7:19 AM

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What is the difference between 現在&今 ?
’今’ is read 'いま' , 'ima' ; and '現在' is read 'げんざい','genzai'; but I think I saw it once read 'いま', 'ima' .
Is it true ?
I know there isn't a big difference in the meaning ..
Modified by aaaqqqsss, Apr 27, 2011 2:48 AM
 
Mar 21, 2011 8:04 AM

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^
genzai mean this era/this time/this moment etc...
ima mean right now, the moment when you're saying this word...
You saw 現在 but the furigana -little hiragana above the kanji- said いま...
it happens a lot in manga like Yami from To Loveru once said something in Kanji but the furigana said タゲット (target), or you see someone name in Kanji but furigana said アイツ.
basically, it can be used if the word have same meaning...
Actually I'm trying to explain this better, but my english not really good XD
Just ask your sensei..
and sorry if my answer is wrong or not really satisfying
Modified by IZUMI64, Mar 21, 2011 8:08 AM
 
Mar 21, 2011 8:42 AM

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No, it is enough for me.
Unfortunately I am self studying the Japanese language, and it is almost impossible to get a sensei in my country. *__*
Anyways I learned English the same way but the Japanese language has less resources than the English one so I have to do a lot of work.

Thanks ..*__*
 
Mar 21, 2011 8:53 AM
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There is no difference in meaning.
Choose the language in some situations.
For example:
「今は、10時だよ(It's ten o'clock.)」⇒Conversations with friends.
「現在、電車が遅れております(The train is behind schedule now.)」⇒Public place.
The comics,it is written to different words the same meaning.

For example:
いま⇒現在  とも⇒強敵
It is wordplay.

Sorry for poor English.
 
Mar 21, 2011 11:32 AM

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Thanks ,
But why comics? I didn't say anything about comics ...
anyways I understood the difference. thank you very much. *__*
 
Mar 22, 2011 7:26 AM
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Sorry.
Because,I often found wordplay in comic.
 
Mar 30, 2011 8:24 PM

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Make it easy on yourself..

現在 = currently
今 = now

"Currently" does a half-decent job at representing the situations you might find 現在 in. Anyways, if you just thinking about the situations they're both used in, you'll get it. Just be patient. Accept that they mean basically the same thing and discover the nuances through other people's usage.
 
Mar 30, 2011 8:29 PM

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hiyagiri said:
Sorry.
Because,I often found wordplay in comic.


謝ることないですよ。メンバーの質問を答えてくれてありがとうございます。

英語のことについての質問があったらどうぞ聞いてください。
 
Mar 31, 2011 7:54 AM

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そですね。何でも聞いてください。ま、英語くらいしか出来ないけど。

if there is any thing wrong with what is written plz tell me .
Thanks .

Also Thank you Zealous.
Modified by aaaqqqsss, Mar 31, 2011 8:02 AM
 
Apr 2, 2011 8:50 PM

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そうですね

usually with a う :P
 
Apr 2, 2011 9:18 PM

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oh yeah , Thanks.
 
May 7, 2011 10:55 AM

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所 this one means 'Place' and read 'Tokoro'
厠 this one means 'Toilet and read 'Kawaya''

if we put them togather '所厠' is there a specific reading for them ?

--------

Also 戦い & 闘い , both of them are read 'Tatakai' in here , is there a difference between them "specifically here" cz I know both of them ?



Thanks in advance ...
Modified by aaaqqqsss, May 7, 2011 11:05 AM
 
May 7, 2011 2:36 PM

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You can't just put 2 kanjis together to make a word. Although it is possible because language is arbitrarily decided by society, right now there's nothing about it. Except if you were talking about chinese, then there seems to be a word for that :P As for the reading, it's really up to you since no one else will be using it.

For tatakai, it's just like kiku (listen, 聞く、聴く、訊く). Although there is some differences, most of it is just the writer's choice. I find that the least often used kanjis are used for poetic stuff like songs and poems.

Googling is also very helpful: http://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/qa/question_detail/q119404901
It says 戦い is mainly to see who's the winner and the loser, while 闘い is to fight for yourself, to not lose to X and it doesn't care about the winner or loser really.
 
May 7, 2011 2:49 PM

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The first one , I didn't just put them together , I saw them like that in an anime .
But I think it might be Chinese.

本当にいつもありがとうございますfireboundさん。勉強になりました。
 
May 10, 2011 12:55 AM
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if you put 2 random characters together, they will generally read in their kun sounds. However, 所厠 is not a word.

But in general,
if each word alone can be a separate word, then the second word, if possible add " to the first sound.
such as ka --> ga, ha --> ba etc.
such as: 青 + 空 ==> あお + そら ==> あおぞら
In this case, japanese on sounds are generally used.

If they are not separate words, in this case, they are mostly pronounced in the kun fashion. You can just combine them.

Note:
If the first word ends in ka, ku, chi, tsu, that sound becomes chiisai tsu (skipping sound).
Furthermore, if the second word starts with the 'h' (ha, he, etc), then if the end of first word ends with ka, ku, chi, tsu, 'n', then h --> p.

EX.
学 + 校 ==> がく + こう => がっこう
発 + 表 ===> はつ + ひょう ==> はっぴょう
心 + 配 ==> しん + はい ==> しんぱい
 
May 12, 2011 8:04 AM

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前のポストで言いましたんですよ
I didn't just put them together randomly , I saw them that way but I think the word is Chinese. Not only "think" , the whole show's writing was messed up, so it is clearly Chinese .

ま、ほかの事は勉強になったんですから。ありがとうございます。
 
May 29, 2011 12:39 AM

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私有地につき means private property. how is it read? and is the "につき" part important? and what does it mean ?
 
May 31, 2011 5:37 AM

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It's read "shiyuuchi ni tsuki". The につき part is the particle に + verb つく. It's similar to <something> について meaning "about <something>, regarding <something>".

For example, translating "I talked about mathematics yesterday.", we'd get
昨日(きのう)数学(すうがく)について話(はなし)をしました
Or "I'd like to talk it over with you."
例のことにつき話し合いたい。

A more formal version of both would be に関(かん)して.

So your 私有地につき would be understoood as "regarding the private private property <whatever needs to be said about the private property in question>"
God sure is cruel, sometimes he makes you live.
Gather some leaves of Japanese.
 
Jun 2, 2011 10:26 AM

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I understood ついて but still don't understand つき.

You wrote "例のことにつき話し合いたい". Why not ”例のことについて話し合いたい。” ?
It just doesn't feel good ^__^

What about "例のことにつきまして話し合いたい" ?

One more thing , my 私有地につき , I saw it written on a sign with nothing more on it and I think it is indicating that the land is a private property but still strange the way it was written.
 
Jun 2, 2011 12:44 PM

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Well, you can actually string sentences by switching verbs in stem form, it's often seen in formal speech and writing, so I though that was the case here. Are you sure there is nothing after, maybe like 私有地につき立ち入り禁止 or something similar? Unless I'm missing something big here, it should be understood as "regarding private property". Also, was つき written in kanji? Because the verb つく can mean "to arrive", but it's strange to see it written in hiragana(because it can mean a lot of other things depending on the kanji used). Anyway, the usage of につき I mentioned above is perfectly fine, you just won't hear it (often) in anime (or elementary courses for that matter) because it has a more formal feeling to it than -te form. I've also seen it used when describing someone/something's actions like this:

内(うち)の子(こ)はいつも黒い(くろい)シャツをき白い(しろい)パンツをはきニヤニヤしってる。
Translated, it would be something like:
Our kid always wears a black t-shirt, white pants and grins.

By the way, using ます in -te form (まして) is quite rare and I don't see it appropriate there. Then again, I'm not a native speaker so my judgement may be incorrect(just my feeling^^).

edit: except in set expressions like はじめまして or 改めまして.
Modified by TokoyamiSenshi, Jun 2, 2011 12:47 PM
God sure is cruel, sometimes he makes you live.
Gather some leaves of Japanese.
 
Jun 2, 2011 7:17 PM

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hmmm I'm doubting your sentence on うちの子... where did you get that sentence? first I rarely see うち as 内 when it refers to one's own household, and isn't it きて as in 着て instead of き (the one before 白い)? except if you want stem form, which... and はき? しってる? @.@

Well, I'm not exactly fluent in Japanese either, so my judgement might be wrong.

@TSF007 tokoyami is right that you don't use ます form in the middle of the sentence. That's because in Japanese the last verb is the only important verb in most cases, thus if you want to make your sentence polite, you only need to stick ます at the very end, and put every other verb in dictionary form or wtv.
 
Jun 3, 2011 7:33 AM

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Well, it's quite common in Kansai, you'll hear women say 内の子 a lot. That said, it's colloquial.

As for き and はき, both are legit stem forms. き comes from 着る(verb for wearing upper-body clothes) which is an 一段動詞(いちだんどうし) like たべる so the stem is just dropping る(unlike 切る which is a 五段動詞 and becomes きり in stem form). はき comes from 履く(verb for wearing lower body clothes and shoes). I'm sorry if not writing them in kanji in the sentence confused you. I did it inspite finding that confusing myself sometimes.

Also, ます can appear in both clauses tied by the particle が, as in:

失礼ですが、お先に帰ります。

Translated as: "I'm sorry but I'll take the liberty of going home ahead of you, dumping on you all the work I failed to do today." Well, not literally, but it often comes down to that in real-life context.

edit:

Indeed, it's supposed to be してる or している if you prefer.
God sure is cruel, sometimes he makes you live.
Gather some leaves of Japanese.
 
Jun 3, 2011 1:00 PM

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TokoyamiSenshi said:
Are you sure there is nothing after, maybe like 私有地につき立ち入り禁止 or something similar?

Yeah, I think there was a "立入禁止” above it.

TokoyamiSenshi said:
Also, was つき written in kanji? Because the verb つく can mean "to arrive"


It was in hiragana and I know about other meanings for つき. That what made it more confusing.

まあ 大体のことはわかった気がする。ありがとうございましたお二人さん。
 
Jun 4, 2011 11:12 AM

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TokoyamiSenshi said:
Well, it's quite common in Kansai, you'll hear women say 内の子 a lot. That said, it's colloquial.

I was talking about the kanji ^^'. usually it's written うちの子, not 内の子
TokoyamiSenshi said:

As for き and はき, both are legit stem forms. き comes from 着る(verb for wearing upper-body clothes) はき comes from 履く(verb for wearing lower body clothes and shoes). I'm sorry if not writing them in kanji in the sentence confused you. I did it inspite finding that confusing myself sometimes.

ah thanks, i forgot (again) about 履く。 i know they are stem forms, it's just too formal I feel.
 
Jun 6, 2011 1:51 PM

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Oh, indeed, hiragana is by far the most often. Then again, I've seen it writen as うち, 内 and 中, all in the Kansai context of "I". The 中 one really surprised me though.

@TSF007: どういたしまして!
God sure is cruel, sometimes he makes you live.
Gather some leaves of Japanese.
 
Jun 7, 2011 7:17 AM

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中 is archaic. My guess is you saw it in a manga or something?
 
Jun 7, 2011 12:18 PM

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Nah, I don't read manga. I think it was some old movie or tv show.
God sure is cruel, sometimes he makes you live.
Gather some leaves of Japanese.
 
Jun 7, 2011 1:37 PM

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Ah, got'cha. I don't read manga either, so I wouldn't know. I just took a guess since there's definitely plenty of manga that have archaic terms in them. ^^

But an old TV show or movie would definitely make sense.
 
Jul 15, 2011 1:39 PM

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I don't if it was asked, but I wondering.

Is anime using the real Japanese language? Like used in everyday?
I mean that in anime, usually when saying:
"Koko wa?" - which translates to "Where am I?". But a direct translation is "Here?". Or:
"Atsui" - which translates to "It's so hot today". But direct translation is "Hot".

My main question is if it used in real life too?
So if I will go to Japan and use these short "sentences" to say a long sentence like in English, it would sound normal.

Thanks.
 
Jul 16, 2011 8:31 AM
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FunnyGames said:
I don't if it was asked, but I wondering.

Is anime using the real Japanese language? Like used in everyday?
I mean that in anime, usually when saying:
"Koko wa?" - which translates to "Where am I?". But a direct translation is "Here?". Or:
"Atsui" - which translates to "It's so hot today". But direct translation is "Hot".

My main question is if it used in real life too?
So if I will go to Japan and use these short "sentences" to say a long sentence like in English, it would sound normal.

Thanks.


Yes, both koko wa and atui is definitely used often.
I heard atsui used several times today, it's sooo hot in Kyoto atm:(
In spoken language, omission is common.
In fact, it'll seem weirder to use complete sentences all the time.
 
Sep 11, 2011 6:26 AM
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I'll introduce to you words peculiar to Japan.


雨宿り(あま やどり)...ama yadori


It means taking shelter from the rain.Noun.


sample sentence:

雨が降ってきたので、雨宿りしよう。
 
Sep 15, 2011 10:56 PM

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That's not so peculiar, and it's actually a suru verb.

edit: which is of course basically a noun, but also a lot more.
God sure is cruel, sometimes he makes you live.
Gather some leaves of Japanese.
 
Oct 15, 2011 10:20 AM

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Could anyone help me with this kanji?

008kk.jpg

I hope you can see it on there, it's from a manga called 異国少女とすみれの花束 that I'm reading to learn more kanji. Unfortunately this one is unknown to me and I can't figure out what it's made up of either so I couldn't find it in the dictionary.

In case it's not clear, it's the last kanji in the big text balloon on the left in the image at the top right.
 
Oct 16, 2011 7:38 PM

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link here

廃墟 はいきょ ruins, abandoned building.
IME pad worked for me :P
 
Oct 17, 2011 12:28 PM

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thank you ^_^
I've tried to use the IME pad before but I can't really figure out how it works ^_^;
 
Apr 18, 2012 1:38 PM

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I'm having trouble reading some kanji again. I'm not very good at reading hand-written kanji, and the page isn't very big so I think it's not very clear.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v603/chuyuri/After%20Stories/abae438e.png

It's the sentence in the middle of the page, under the second image: まだ旧???の人もいるらしい。 That's what I can make of it but I totally can't figure out the kanji where I put the question marks ^_^;
 
Dec 9, 2012 6:28 AM

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Hello~
I' want to start to learn japanese, but I don't know where I should start...Can anyone help me?
I've bought a exercise book, vocabulary book & a grammar book~
 
Jan 20, 2013 10:42 AM

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Hello guys and girls!

I just wanted to ask a quick question. There's a couple of things really annoying me about the first OP in 灼眼のシャナ, (I know it's just a song but), they pronounce 記憶 as 「とき」(which just makes me think 時)and it just....can't be pronounced like that.

It's in the sentence 「いつかは 消えゆく記憶(とき)」and sure enough it translates as "someday they will become vanished memories" or something similar, not "when it will sometime vanish" or "someday, the time when it will vanish" or something along those lines (which is how I was translating in my head before I actually read the lyrics. As far as I know 億 can only be pronounced 「オク」and 記 has the 「しる(す)」kun-yomi for the verb and「キ」for the on-yomi...

Is the singer making some kind of play on the word for memory and turning it into time? If so how the hell are you meant to know that unless you read the lyrics and see the kanji is different...if you were just listening to it you wouldn't think it was 記憶, would you?

Thanks and sorry if it's a stupid question! Maybe I'm just reading too much into it...
 
Jan 20, 2013 4:20 PM

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@jonnyb193

Not a stupid question at all.

In short, you can't know until you read the lyrics and see the kanji is different. Try searching other lyrics, and you'll see it happens in Japanese lyrics all the time. It's sort of like reading 禁書目録 as インデックス (Toaru Majutsu no Index), and this sort of wordplay is a common phenomenon in Japanese. Kanji can be seen as a mere attribute to the spoken language, and so in any form of literature, kanji can be used outside its daily functions to express a conglomeration of new meanings. In music, this method may be used to avoid excess syllables, but you also get a different feeling by expressing 記憶 as トキ instead of simply saying キオク or using 時. Another common one would be 運命 and サダメ, like in Jojo's first OP.
Modified by ap19, Jan 20, 2013 5:13 PM
http://www.nicovideo.jp/user/5040721
I'm Japanese, so if you have any questions regarding Japan, feel free to ask.
アメリカ育ちなので、なんか英語に関して質問があれば気軽にどうぞ。
 
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