Forum Settings
Forums
Pages (3) « 1 2 [3]
Must be a Club Member to Reply 
Jan 21, 2013 2:01 PM

Offline
Joined: Nov 2012
Posts: 13
@ap19

Thanks for the reply, that's really put my mind at ease, it was driving me half crazy! Yeah, actually in the same song they do that sort of thing a couple more times but it was more obvious to tell what was going on (e.g. 結来 is read as 「みらい」, which is in some ways more confusing seeing as that isn't actually a compound according to my dictionary.)

Still, I felt it was easier to understand that than the 記憶「とき」lyric, because they are keeping the word the same and changing the kanji, rather than keeping the kanji the same and changing the reading of the word! So I heard 未来 when I listened to 結来, and that's essentially right, just the nuance of the word is slightly changed by using that other kanji right?

Thanks again for your help, I might start frequenting this thread more often now!
 
Nov 15, 2013 12:00 AM

Offline
Joined: Nov 2012
Posts: 1740
Hey everyone, I'll make this short I love the japanese language to bits and I wanted to ask a question since the curiosity is killing me. When I look up 'biyori' or 'setsugetsuka' in dictionaries I can't find anything, I know biyori is 'weather' and not sure why none of the dictionaries I'm looking at have that in. Setsugetsuka had a translation but I got the feeling like it was some kind of creation from other words. Anyway, sorry to bother about that but it's really killing me.


 
Nov 15, 2013 8:22 PM

Offline
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 357
@Orevataf

The correct read for 日和 is ひより. It becomes びより when it's compounded with a noun-adjective. 遠足日和 (エンソクびより)(picnic weather). It happens with many words, such as box and lunchbox 箱(はこ)、弁当箱(ベントウばこ).

雪月花(セツゲツカ) is not a word, but a phrase taken from poetry written by 白居易(ハク キョイ). It represents the beauty of nature via the snow, the moon, and the flower. It is NOT the name of a flower, but may be used as such in fictional writing.

Biba said:
I'm having trouble reading some kanji again. I'm not very good at reading hand-written kanji, and the page isn't very big so I think it's not very clear.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v603/chuyuri/After%20Stories/abae438e.png

It's the sentence in the middle of the page, under the second image: まだ旧???の人もいるらしい。 That's what I can make of it but I totally can't figure out the kanji where I put the question marks ^_^;


I know this is a mad old post, but anyway. It's 旧制服(キュウセイフク)(old/former uniform)
Modified by ap19, Nov 15, 2013 8:27 PM
http://www.nicovideo.jp/user/5040721
I'm Japanese, so if you have any questions regarding Japan, feel free to ask.
アメリカ育ちなので、なんか英語に関して質問があれば気軽にどうぞ。
 
Nov 15, 2013 10:21 PM

Offline
Joined: Nov 2012
Posts: 1740
ap19 said:
@Orevataf

The correct read for 日和 is ひより. It becomes びより when it's compounded with a noun-adjective. 遠足日和 (エンソクびより)(picnic weather). It happens with many words, such as box and lunchbox 箱(はこ)、弁当箱(ベントウばこ).

雪月花(セツゲツカ) is not a word, but a phrase taken from poetry written by 白居易(ハク キョイ). It represents the beauty of nature via the snow, the moon, and the flower. It is NOT the name of a flower, but may be used as such in fictional writing.

Wow thanks a lot for the detailed info!!


 
Jan 2, 2014 6:12 AM
Offline
Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 23
Hi o/
I'm still learning the basics so the doubt is a little dumb...
The pronounce of the R column (ら、り、る、れ、ろ) and H column (は、ひ,, る、れ、ろ) are similar but the difference is H column is "stronger"?

Thanks!
 
Jan 8, 2014 4:08 AM

Offline
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 357
x_Teu_x said:
Hi o/
I'm still learning the basics so the doubt is a little dumb...
The pronounce of the R column (ら、り、る、れ、ろ) and H column (は、ひ,, る、れ、ろ) are similar but the difference is H column is "stronger"?

Thanks!


I don't quite understand how that happened with the hiragana there.
らりるれろ
はひふへほ
If you're French, then you will have problems with this, and I cannot help you. Otherwise, you should be able to differentiate between the English r and the English h.
http://www.nicovideo.jp/user/5040721
I'm Japanese, so if you have any questions regarding Japan, feel free to ask.
アメリカ育ちなので、なんか英語に関して質問があれば気軽にどうぞ。
 
Feb 6, 2014 5:09 AM

Offline
Joined: Nov 2012
Posts: 1740
Hey everyone, my windows broke so couldn't type in japanese but I wanted to send one of my friends a google translated sentence: When will (you) write the much anticipated first entry? (Of your blog)
待望の最初のエントリを書き込みますいつですか?
The meaning behind my question didn't get through at all.
Other than the grammatical drivel Google Translate sometimes shouts I'd just like to know which part causes confusion or is likely to cause confusion to the native speaker. ap19, sorry to directly ask you, any thoughts?


 
Feb 17, 2014 8:10 PM

Offline
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 4764
Orevataf said:
Hey everyone, my windows broke so couldn't type in japanese but I wanted to send one of my friends a google translated sentence: When will (you) write the much anticipated first entry? (Of your blog)
待望の最初のエントリを書き込みますいつですか?
The meaning behind my question didn't get through at all.
Other than the grammatical drivel Google Translate sometimes shouts I'd just like to know which part causes confusion or is likely to cause confusion to the native speaker. ap19, sorry to directly ask you, any thoughts?


though im just a beginner, that phrase makes 0 sense.
待望 means long-awaited, something you wait with anticipation
書き込みます means to fill out, such as when you fill out a form
and it sounds kinda rude (edit: ah, your friend ok...)
Modified by DreamingBeats, Feb 17, 2014 10:30 PM
 
Feb 21, 2014 2:25 PM

Offline
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 357
@orevataf

"which part is likely to cause (the most) confusion?"

書き込みます

It's hidden subject would be the speaker him/herself, and ます ends the sentence.
http://www.nicovideo.jp/user/5040721
I'm Japanese, so if you have any questions regarding Japan, feel free to ask.
アメリカ育ちなので、なんか英語に関して質問があれば気軽にどうぞ。
 
Feb 22, 2014 1:36 PM

Offline
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 4764
also, i don't think it's clear that you meant his blog, which adds another layer of confusion
 
Aug 28, 2014 4:51 PM
Offline
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 4
Hey guys, I was wondering what the difference between the different ways to say numbers such as nana and shichi or yon shi and yo
 
Aug 29, 2014 9:10 PM

Offline
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 357
There's no logically explanatory rule regarding which expression you would use for 4, 7, etc. However, for example, you don't say shichi-man for 70k; it's always nana-man. All I can say regarding this is, take it for granted from input, and don't feel embarrassed when your output is revised. I mean, it has more to do with pleasant sound than any grammatical rule, and this is far from having an explanation.
http://www.nicovideo.jp/user/5040721
I'm Japanese, so if you have any questions regarding Japan, feel free to ask.
アメリカ育ちなので、なんか英語に関して質問があれば気軽にどうぞ。
 
Jan 27, 2015 1:50 PM

Offline
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 4350
Can someone please translate what is being said in this pic to English?:

 
Jan 27, 2015 4:38 PM

Offline
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 357
JumpinJC said:
Can someone please translate what is being said in this pic to English?:



You bastard! Atone with your death.


There are probably 50 more ways you can translate this, but I think this one is fine.

http://www.nicovideo.jp/user/5040721
I'm Japanese, so if you have any questions regarding Japan, feel free to ask.
アメリカ育ちなので、なんか英語に関して質問があれば気軽にどうぞ。
 
Mar 20, 2015 10:00 AM

Offline
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 336
So... If I got this right : 五日 (いつか) means five days, or the fifth day of the month.
But いつか can also mean 'someday' right?
 
Mar 20, 2015 10:04 AM
otaking
Offline
Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 24831
Nay non Japanese in this group with Kan ken 2kyu or higher
"If you tremble with indignation at every injustice, then you are a comrade of mine"

When the union's inspiration through the workers' blood shall run
There can be no power greater anywhere beneath the sun
Yet what force on earth is weaker than the feeble strength of one
For the Union makes us strong
 
Apr 5, 2015 3:09 AM

Offline
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 188
Hello everyone. I have a little "weird" question. I would be really glad, if anyone could tell me the rules of this puzzle games. I mean, I read the description (and I did understood it), but still I don't get it (cons of being an idiot).

Photo is little big, so only the link to it (hope it doesn't break any rules).

http://images69.fotosik.pl/771/14cf0b42d6059f5e.jpg
 
Apr 5, 2015 9:56 AM

Offline
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 357
@Erelen

図形 ずけい diagram
人形 にんぎょう doll
手形 てがた authorized documentation
円形 えんけい circular

That should answer your question.
http://www.nicovideo.jp/user/5040721
I'm Japanese, so if you have any questions regarding Japan, feel free to ask.
アメリカ育ちなので、なんか英語に関して質問があれば気軽にどうぞ。
 
Apr 5, 2015 10:29 AM

Offline
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 188
Oh this way. Now I get this, thank you very much ap19.
 
Apr 29, 2015 3:41 AM

Offline
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 233
Hello everyone. I have a question.
Is there a word or a phrase which specifies the meaning of "ラキスケ (ラッキースケベ)" in English?

「ラキスケ」の意味を特定する単語かフレーズって英語にありますか?
(つまんねーことだったらごめんなさい。)
 
May 9, 2015 8:32 AM

Offline
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 357
I can't come up with one at this point.

覗き魔 would be Peeping Tom, but that's not really ラッキースケベ
http://www.nicovideo.jp/user/5040721
I'm Japanese, so if you have any questions regarding Japan, feel free to ask.
アメリカ育ちなので、なんか英語に関して質問があれば気軽にどうぞ。
 
May 13, 2015 9:31 AM

Offline
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 233
ap19 said:
I can't come up with one at this point.

覗き魔 would be Peeping Tom, but that's not really ラッキースケベ

Thank you very much ap19.

Raimu4 said:
So... If I got this right : 五日 (いつか) means five days, or the fifth day of the month.
But いつか can also mean 'someday' right?

(It looks no one has mentioned about that).

いつか (someday) is usually written as "いつか" or "何時か".
いつか (five days, or the fifth day of a month) is usually written as "五日" or "5日".

Also, in pronunciation,
いつか (someday) is slightly accented on "い".
いつか (five days, or the fifth day of a month) is slightly accented on "か".
 
Jul 17, 2015 11:01 AM
Offline
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 105
I might study abroad in Japan some time for a semester, what are things I should be wary of, such as rules and addressing people
 
Top
Pages (3) « 1 2 [3]