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#1
Aug 14, 2008 8:23 AM

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Feel free to ask questions here regarding Japan or it's language. I'm sure someone, me, a club officer, or helpful member will point you in the right direction or answer your question directly.
 
#2
Oct 24, 2008 2:39 PM

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Quick question. Does the Japanese language uses extensive vocabulary as the American language do?
Modified by azncrisis, Oct 25, 2008 12:16 PM
 
#3
Oct 24, 2008 8:05 PM

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Well that's kind of an interesting question. I'm not quite sure what you mean by "extensive." If that's something special or not. I can't say for sure if Japanese uses extensive vocabulary, but I'm assuming because the language is thousands of years old and several fields interest have their own sets of Kanji, amongst other things, that they do. I'm certain there's enough vocabulary in the language to keep you busy.
 
#4
Oct 25, 2008 12:20 PM

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Okay, thanks. It was a random question that just popped in my head while studding my vocab. ^-^ "Extensive" is not all that important.
 
#5
Oct 25, 2008 2:34 PM

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I'm just saying that there is an infinite amount of ways to say the same thing. And I'm sure the Japanese have plenty of vocab. :)
 
#6
Oct 28, 2008 8:49 PM

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Ture. It was just a question that really popped in my head and couldn't get rid of that question till I aksed. :)
 
#7
Jan 12, 2009 10:51 AM

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I've been thinking about starting a study on Japan. Not only the language but the whole assets including; culture, religions, language, writing, art etc. - I'm not sure if I would start this though since it will be a big step in my life (need to quit work and move to other side of the country to study Japanese). Therefor I planned a vacation to Japan first. I didn't actually set anything up yet, but I'm thinking about 2 weeks (1st week Tokyo, then move by train to 2nd week in Kyoto) and taste the culture there myself.

I'm interested in self-study also and I might get a self-study pack in my own language (which is Dutch) and see if I can work out some basics before I go to Japan and/or study.

I already have a travelguide for Japan with most used terms like 'My name is...' 'Where is the busstation' etc. Also includes alot of loose words and even numbers. I'm currently reading up on that (mostly Tokyo/Kyoto and the island Hokkaidō).
★♥ マイケル ♥★
"If you obey the rules - You miss all the fun" [Kumashiro Maya]
 
#8
Jan 12, 2009 12:56 PM

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going to Japan for immersion is cool :D (among other things :P)

Which self-study pack specifically do you use? Is it only in Dutch or other languages?

lol@travelguides. it's only used for travellers, not those who really want to learn the language. They don't quite cover the basics of Japanese, just tell you what to say in travellers' everyday encounters.

Anyway, if you haven't started to learn Japanese yet and if you want to visit Japan, I highly suggest, at the very minimum, to learn katakana first, then hiragana, before going there.
 
#9
Jan 12, 2009 1:43 PM

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The self-study pack is in Dutch and Japanese. Just learning the basics of the language. Didnt get it yet and I'm only considering on getting that before I do anything else.

I dont really use the travelguide for study though. Mainly use it to get some background information on things in Japan, like shops, restaurants and other sight seeing spots. It's quite helpful in that way. In NOT trying to learn the language just by that book.

I havent started any study, like I said. I'm picking up stuff from animé and movies I watch (which I do regular) and try to catch up on some things via the internet. That's why I consider taking the self-study pack to get the basics of katakana and probably kanji.

I'll go to Japan anyway. If I get to know some basics or not. I'm pretty sure I'll get by with my English. If not, then it'll be a good experience anyway. Just to be among the native people and their everyday habbits. You know, get a look at the culture and lifestyle.
★♥ マイケル ♥★
"If you obey the rules - You miss all the fun" [Kumashiro Maya]
 
Jan 12, 2009 4:18 PM
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I know its a very personal decision but I HIGHLY recommend that you DO NOT quit your job and go to japan, especially in this financial downturn. I know two people that did this (one for a girl and one for anime) and both got screwed. Unless you can get your company to transfer you over to japan (highly recommended), I suggest that you get fluent in the language before going. Fields where language is not so important (IT, etc) may hire a non-japanese, non-native speaker but almost every other field is going to require mastery of the language. Even professionals with years of experience have a hard time finding a permanent job in japan because lack of japanese skills basically cut their worth to the company by 90%.

That said, if you can study abroad through an institution that would be the best. You don't have to worry about making money and you'll be able to interact with other japanese college students easily vs. having to mess with finicky coworkers, haha.

oh, and you just need to know how to say subway station (eki, 駅) and the phrase "how do I get to" (_____wa doko desuka) along with the phrase "sumimasen" and you'll be fine. I go to japan every few years and its a great place to visit.
 
Jan 13, 2009 9:03 AM

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Well, first I want to clear one thing up. I dont plan on quiting my job to go to Japan. I was thinking about a study here in the Netherlands, which would require me to stop working and find a new job. This is due to the fact that the school is 250/300KM away from where I live at this moment.

With that cleared. I would really love to study abroad through an institution, but I didnt actually searched for that option yet. Havent really gotten my hands on anything really. I was only thinking about it since I'm kinda 'stuck in life' and want to start something new. Considered a couple of options and thusfar it seems like studying Japanese is the best option for me. That's why I asked advise when it came to studies and such. And like I just said; studying through an institution abroad sounds like a real good idea and I'll have a look into it as soon as I get some time off (which will be 'round summertime).

Also: I'm going to Japan on vacation this year and I was thinking about going to Tokyo for 2 weeks. Then I figured I wanted to see more of Japan while I was there and thought I could do a 1/1 vacation. 1st week Tokyo, 2nd week Kyoto - or something like that. I'll go to the travelagency this weekend to figure everything out. It will be my first time to Japan - so I'm quite excited!
★♥ マイケル ♥★
"If you obey the rules - You miss all the fun" [Kumashiro Maya]
 
Jan 24, 2009 1:28 PM

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Hello there, I have a small problem and I need help with it :)

I got a sentence like this -> この小さ村の教会に一人の牧師がやって来た。

also some anime titles has something like -> イタズラ Kiss

My question is : What is the function of な in these sentences ? I'm almost sure that in each example this な is making an adjective from word before, but why is it used like that ?
 
Jan 24, 2009 2:25 PM

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Indeed it is part of an adjective. The な particle is only used with these kinds of adjectives though. In your first example, the な is actually part of the word 「小さな」 meaning small.

Quick explanation of な-adjectives:
The な particle is only actually used in a sentence when the adjective comes before the noun that it's describing. Example: 大切な本 (たいせつなほん - important book)
Other than that, it's just left out, and instead replaced bu the word です. Example: この本は大切です (このほんはたいせつです - this book is important)

My Anime List | My Manga List | Blog (rarely updated)
^_^
 
Jan 24, 2009 6:25 PM

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I don't know that the description you gave is all to accurate. For example, な is also used in cases where you have non-conjugated nouns and な-adjectives in sentences like 「学生なんで、学校行く。」 Meaning "Because (he/she/I/you/etc.) is a student, (he/she/I/you/etc.) will go to school." And, another instance is, 「なので、駅に行かない?」 Meaning "Is that why you won't go to the station?"

I recommend reading this: http://www.guidetojapanese.org/adjectives.html and this http://www.guidetojapanese.org/particles3.html

That should resolve any confusion about な-adjectives and other uses of な.
 
Jan 24, 2009 6:43 PM

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But 「ちいさい」 is い-adjective not な-adjective in it's basic form, that's why i'm curious why sentence up was writing with using な instead of い. I'm sure that both means the same "small" but there must be still a difference between basic form and this な-form adjective.

also i don't think it have something with なんで and なので, but i read those pages and i think in second example it will be used for sure to stick noun-adjective word as an adjective with noun

@down
Ups,I corrected my mistake with long vowel :)
Modified by kurizu, Jan 25, 2009 5:52 AM
 
Jan 24, 2009 7:32 PM

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It's because they're 2 different adjectives: chiisai and chiisana . those long vowels are just... killersometimes. It took me a while to find out baai was 場合 because I thought it was bai and i kept looking it up and it wasn't there....

chiisai IS i-adjective
chiisana is chiisana, it's not -na adjective in the sense you don't attach na, it just is chiisana. There's no such thing as chiisa..

so it would be chiisana koe, etc. It's as jisho.org says "Pre-noun adjectival" so I don't think you can say chiisana da (googled it) so it's not like na-adjective in that sense.

you only use it to describe nouns..

jisho says something
Modified by midori-, Jan 25, 2009 7:34 AM

今はどんでん返しの時代ではない★너와 함께 했던 일상은
어느샌가 작은 영화속 풍경이되고 ☆
 
Jan 25, 2009 11:35 AM

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I don't see what the fuss is about really. I mean, all you have to do is learn to use these things on a case by case basis. So, I recommend just looking up a bunch of example sentences from Yahoo! Japan's dictionary, and Goo Dictionary, and just look at the examples and see how 小さな is used.

With all the exceptions, multiple readings, etc. it is serious better to learn things on a case-by-case basis with grammatically correct example sentences. That means you need to use your dictionary (Yahoo, Sanseido, Goo, Infoseek). I don't recommend the sentences in the Tanaka Corpus (used in quite a number of dictionaries, like WWWJDIC and Jisho.org) because they contain errors. And, I don' know if each sentence has a usage warning on it or not for the ones that do contain errors. And, by errors I mean unnatural sounding Japanese.

And, if you want even more examples, I can look up 小さな for you in my children's dictionary and in the 大辞林 (the authoritative Japanese dictionary) and paste some of the examples here for you.

「小さい」 and 「小さな」 mean the same thing fundamentally, they just have different uses. That's why they use the same Kanji. And, as midori- explained, they are different words. Just look up usage examples in those dictionaries. I think that's enough to solve any word usage confusion.
 
Jan 26, 2009 8:03 AM

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I solved this problem after reading midori-'s post, That was what i have in mind from the beginning, anyway thanks all who answered my question here :)

 
Aug 15, 2009 3:21 PM

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Reindal said:
The self-study pack is in Dutch and Japanese. Just learning the basics of the language. Didnt get it yet and I'm only considering on getting that before I do anything else.

I dont really use the travelguide for study though. Mainly use it to get some background information on things in Japan, like shops, restaurants and other sight seeing spots. It's quite helpful in that way. In NOT trying to learn the language just by that book.

I havent started any study, like I said. I'm picking up stuff from animé and movies I watch (which I do regular) and try to catch up on some things via the internet. That's why I consider taking the self-study pack to get the basics of katakana and probably kanji.

I'll go to Japan anyway. If I get to know some basics or not. I'm pretty sure I'll get by with my English. If not, then it'll be a good experience anyway. Just to be among the native people and their everyday habbits. You know, get a look at the culture and lifestyle.


I think you really shouldn't learn alot of language from anime because they dont talk like real people...if you talked to someone in japan saying something like the person from anime would say, they'd look at you like... "wtf?" even if it was a normal every-day sentence. i guess you could use a couple words just not the way they sound ^___^
 
Aug 15, 2009 5:59 PM

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Zealous said:
I don't see what the fuss is about really. I mean, all you have to do is learn to use these things on a case by case basis.


This is the important part. A lot of people confuse themselves with these grammar issues, when in the first place, grammar study does not have the capacity to teach you appropriate, fluent, and natural language use. You can not learn to speak correctly by studying or arguing over grammar. It simply will not happen, and natural speech wanders beyond grammar lines.

As was said, you have to learn this on a case-by-case basis.

I'm not even going to offer any input on the grammar aspect. Here are some examples that I thought up:

「この小さな星を見て」

「星が小さくて見えない」

「小さいから見えないのか?」

Can I tell you why I use them the way I do? No. But it feels natural. That's all that matters (once you get to the point that things do and do not feel natural), and you can't replace it with grammar knowledge. Doesn't mean my Japanese is perfect (I still lack the exposure to be to that point), but given enough time, it will eventually make the difference between foreigner Japanese and fluent, natural Japanese.

It doesn't mean you can't study grammar, it means that grammar is a tool with which to consciously understand the format of a language, not a tool with which to speak it.

It could be 小さな声, it could be 声が小さい, depending on the context. Context is key.

For example, I might say 小さな声 if I were saying 彼女は、小さな声でそう言った

I might say 声が小さい if I were saying 彼女の声が小さいので、よく聞いて下さい
Modified by hikky, Aug 15, 2009 6:05 PM
 
Aug 15, 2009 8:36 PM

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hikky said:


It doesn't mean you can't study grammar, it means that grammar is a tool with which to consciously understand the format of a language, not a tool with which to speak it.


I love this quote. That is all. :)
 
Aug 15, 2009 11:34 PM

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Lol, I think I'm missing something. I'm not really sure why there's any kind of debate. Unless this is going back to January. o_O
 
Aug 16, 2009 12:39 PM

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Zealous said:
Lol, I think I'm missing something. I'm not really sure why there's any kind of debate. Unless this is going back to January. o_O


Oh yeah, sorry about that. Easy to miss that since there's not a lot of constant activity on the club forums.
 
Aug 16, 2009 4:26 PM

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Yeah, no problem. I mean, I like your reply, just threw me off. I wasn't sure if there was someone who deleted their post or what. ^^
 
Apr 2, 2010 1:06 PM

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How would you say something like this in Japanese: I am excited to be working with you this year.

Please type in romaji (my computer can't read Japanese anymore thanks to not having the Asian Language package on my computer).
 
Apr 10, 2010 2:47 AM

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issho ni hataraku you ni natte, watashi wa shiawase ni narimashita! -- I don't know for sure, because there might be some set phrase that people use. This was just something I came up with based on the meaning of the English.
 
Apr 26, 2010 3:07 AM

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I know this is a big request, but I am really desperate for help!
I was wondering, could anyone please write what Miku says in the
following video, in Japanese.

I realize that the video is already subtitled in English, but what I really need is some
of the things he says written down in Japanese, for me to read.
He speaks too fast for me to pick up most of the words....
Even basic dot points would be very helpful!
I would be very grateful if someone help me with this..! >_<
====================================================




 
Apr 26, 2010 12:03 PM

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bubica said:
in the
following video, in Japanese.


what video? link plz :D
 
Apr 26, 2010 9:52 PM

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LOL. xD
That'd be a very good idea firebound~

Link

It drove me insane... -_-"
Lol, sorry if you don't like Visual Kei;
but I need I'll need to learn the vocabulary from it for an assignment.
But it doesn't help if I can't pick up any vocab.. >_<"
Modified by bubica, Apr 26, 2010 9:55 PM
====================================================




 
Apr 28, 2010 2:21 AM

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I'm not sure if you might know this, but the in the Japanese Zen teaching., there is such a thing as 'Mu'. It is 'nothingness' and negative. Here is more information. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mu_negative Erm, please put brackets outside the word 'negative' in the url, because brackets won't show up as part of the link...

I really want to know what the opposite of 'Mu' is. Well, I know it is 'something' and positive, but what is the name for it?

Does anyone know? Thank you.
Modified by thewhitesea, Apr 28, 2010 2:26 AM
 
May 10, 2010 12:35 PM

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The opposite of 無 is 有. Here is some more information about them.
Modified by Mahlerite, May 10, 2010 12:41 PM
 
Jun 18, 2010 3:02 AM
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Hi! everyone, does anybody know what does it mean ppe?

Like they call Yuri in angel beats, yurippe, or Giroro, in Keroro gunsou giroppe (in one episode)...

also "yan", is it some kind of dialect?
 
Jun 27, 2010 8:49 PM

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Hi, I've been trying to translate a song, but I'm stuck on one character :/

Please someone help me!
 
Jun 28, 2010 6:18 AM

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飛 ひ. means flying like in airplane (飛行機)
 
Jun 28, 2010 5:16 PM

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Thank you so much for the help :D
 
Jun 29, 2010 10:08 PM

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krzysztofskorek said:
Hi! everyone, does anybody know what does it mean ppe?

Like they call Yuri in angel beats, yurippe, or Giroro, in Keroro gunsou giroppe (in one episode)...

also "yan", is it some kind of dialect?


-ppe is just an attachment that friends put at the end of each other's names which creates a new nickname of sorts. There's a number of them which are common such as -ppe, -tan, -rin, -pyon, etc.

As far as dialects go, yan is usually used in the southern Kansai region around Wakayama prefecture as a negative verb ending. All I can tell you about that I'm afraid.
 
Jul 12, 2010 7:27 PM

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Hello can I get help on what does genki odashite mean?

 
Jul 12, 2010 8:46 PM

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元気を出して (げんきをだして, genki o dashite)

It means "cheer up!" :)!!

also a short version: 元気出して! (げんきだして, genki dashite)
 
Jul 13, 2010 2:39 PM

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Does anybody perhaps have an idea, what 分かたる might mean?
It doesn't appear in any of the online dictionaries of my knowledge.
(wadoku.de, jisho.org, http://www.onlinedic.com, http://www.dictionnaire-japonais.com) nor in any hardcopy dictionary I have.

The word comes of from this phrase:
星霜を積むし、長き旅のはて辿り着いた地は、遠く分かたれて
It's from the front page of the 70th chapter of the manga series "Nabari no Ou". The author sometimes uses rather antique words, it would not surprise me, if this is the case again.

Hovering over 分かたれて with PeraPerakun gives me, that it
is passive and te-form of 分かつ (to divide, to separate, to distinguish).
Not too sure, how to put that into the above phrase.
My guess was bit like this:


Anyway, my initial thought was, that the form would come from 分かたる. And I somehow would like to know, what it means.
Google finds me 分かたる about 500 times. It does seem to exist somehow, through not very common. . My guesses upon the results is, that it goes pretty close to the direction of "to seperate"? (Or are all of them typos of 別れる?)
 
Jul 16, 2010 9:03 PM

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Is there another line following that bit of dialog? I've read Nabari no Ou before (only the first volume, though). It's enough to realize that they use an interesting writing style. :)

I ask for the the following part only because I'm curious as to the end of that sentence since something ending in て using means there's something after it, whether it's being implied or it's explicitly written.

Anyways, the answer your question..

This is the result of my searching twitter for that word: 分かたるのリアルタイム検索結果はありません

And, goo辞書 (Which gets it's dictionary data from the 大辞林) turned up nothing. Which isn't unusual, but if the WWWJDIC also turns up nothing, then I'm going go ahead and say that it's not a word, really. Most of the results from searching it in Google highlight かたる which is a word, and only a few have "分かたる".

Despair not, though! Because 分かつ makes total sense in that sentence..

「星霜を積むし、長き旅のはて辿り着いた地は、遠く分かたれて」
直訳: years [DOP] pile up, long journey's end arrived at after a struggle place [as for] distantly separated ...
口語訳: The years go by, and.. the land in that (we) reached at the end of our long journey is distant...

This might make more sense if I knew what the main verb of the sentence is (which is later on in the book, or, this is just meant to be incomplete), of it I knew the context of the sentence. The context would be more helpful in providing a more accurate translation.

Well, I hope that helps. :\

[DOP] = Direct Object Particle
 
Jul 24, 2010 1:40 AM

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what is utskie mean? i dont know if its love or like and also what is liar/lying said in japanese.


 
Jul 29, 2010 8:10 AM

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Usotsuki 嘘つき うそつき -> liar
Suki 好き すき -> Like/love
 
Aug 24, 2010 4:35 AM
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I have a question. I'm beginning to practice hiragana (i'm totaly noob btw) and I more or less can recognize hiragana characters and its sounds when I see them but... I need to practice writing cause I have no idea.

The question, ¿is there any notebook for japanese calligraphy? I was also thinking about picking a normal 'western' square page, like that of mathematics notebooks and write there but I don't know if the hiragana characters are suposed to be square. I mean, I don't want to write them too wide or too tall.

Is there anyone who could help me with this?

Thanks. ありがと !!
 
Aug 24, 2010 4:35 AM
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I have a question. I'm beginning to practice hiragana (i'm totaly noob btw) and I more or less can recognize hiragana characters and its sounds when I see them but... I need to practice writing cause I have no idea.

The question, ¿is there any notebook for japanese calligraphy? I was also thinking about picking a normal 'western' square page, like that of mathematics notebooks and write there but I don't know if the hiragana characters are suposed to be square. I mean, I don't want to write them too wide or too tall.

Is there anyone who could help me with this?

Thanks. ありがと !!
 
Aug 24, 2010 8:04 AM

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I use one of those square page notebook myself :)

As for practicing hiragana, the most important thing is just to write it out with a paper and pen. Doesn't matter if it's square or not, but I guess writing in a constricted space might help you at the beginning.

So sure, go ahead and write :D
 
Aug 29, 2010 3:32 PM

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I advise writing all Japanese characters in squares; their notebooks are arranged that way. If you have a standard (0.5cmx0.5cm) squared notebook, writing them in areas 2 by 2 squares is great practice.
God sure is cruel, sometimes he makes you live.
Gather some leaves of Japanese.
 
Aug 31, 2010 7:07 AM

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So, I just started my first Japanese course last week, and we're starting to get into learning hiragana. I don't have a problem with writing it, but I'm having a bit of a problem memorizing them.

:/ Does anyone know any methods I could use to help me with this...?

Edit: Haha...oops. I just realized that the question above me was a bit similar to mine.
 
Sep 6, 2010 12:17 PM
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Well, I have another question. You recommend in the homepage of this club alljapaneseallthetime as a good source for learning. But, that page is really strange. I've been reading a lot of it and all the guy says is self-help things and stimulation and that stuff, but nothing japanese. And when I think I finally found something, as his method for learning, I discover this guy is charging for everything! 10 bucks for this, 15 for that.. WTF?

Is that website really helpful? Is it worth paying 10 bucks for this guy telling you what the steps should be in your learning proccess?

I began SRSing hiragana and katakana characters, but I don't know what should be my next steps.

Any help would be appreciated!
 
Sep 6, 2010 12:59 PM

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Ajatt have evolved since the last time I saw it... so I don't know much. Anyway, the whole reason we follow some of the principles of AJATT is the fact that it's free and fun.

If you're confused about the specific steps, here is the overall plan:

1. hiragana and katakana (AJATT says Kanji first, but I actually like starting with hiragana and katakana because you can read mangas right away).
2. KANJI with RTK (Remembering the Kanji vol 1 - meaning and writing). This is really what helped me learn Japanese much much faster. It might look completely useless at first, but when you finish it... it's magic :) More concretely, you remove all fear of kanjis, you can guess MUCH easier (trust me, this is the biggest advantage) and it can help you memorize new kanjis, among many things. If you don't really like the stories on RTK, you can go on http://kanji.koohii.com to get stories from others :)
3. SENTENCE: Now that Kanji is pass (you still have to how to read them). Use an SRS to put sentences you like, review them and especially don't overdo it. It burns.
4. EXPLORE: Seriously, do what you like IN JAPANESE. You like manga? read them! you like anime? watch them! you like japanese blogs? go surf on them! You like chatting with people? extend your network. You like writing Japanese? I recommend Lang-8 so that other people can correct your journals :)
 
Sep 6, 2010 1:15 PM
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First of all, firebound. Let me say to you: HUGE THANKS!!

You put things now clear on my mind. I was thinking about puting words on hiragana, learning some grammar, etc. before going into kanji..., I don't know why but I felt kanji was the last thing to do... but now I know that is so wrong.

Remembering the Kanji (the three volumes) I've already have. So now I'll focus on styding the three books before going into sentence. I've began learning the first one and it confirms your advice.

I have much work to do, but I least I know what to do.

thank you
 
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