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What are the requirements for an anime to get "reanimated"?

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Jun 15, 10:43 PM
#1

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Oct 2017
2604
Like, recently we've seen a lot of old popular shows which seem to be abandoned/ forgotten, but got a surprised season 2 or season 3 adaptation. The gap can range from 6~12 years. Sometimes even longer.

So what are the actual requirement for an anime to get reanimated?
If the company really want the series to flourish/ make money out of it, shouldn't they just do s2/ s3 way earlier? Like right when the anime season ends or 1~2 years afterward?
What are the incentive/ requirement for them to reanimate an 8~12 year old series?

Yeah i'm still waiting for NGNL S2 and Grimgar S2 which would likely never come. But considering recently there're some seemingly random old popular seires get reanimated, I feel like there might still be hope for it.
Jun 15, 10:59 PM
#2

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Jul 2021
5736
i don't even know if its based on sales or anything. if its after such a long time i can just think that it has to be based on the executives. they must be thinking this anime should get another season might get profit.

or they already wanted to continue the adaptation but due to some reason it wasn't able to continue at the earlier time. maybe source material issue, busy studio. i cant think of a solid reason for sequels to come out after a long period except just a change of heart of the executives. if they say make it, the studio has got to make it.

or maybe market analysis. for example with kimi no todoke they must have seen how good shoujos are so highly missing but people are looking for good shoujo animes so they must have thought lets release the sequels of this shoujo anime which has proved itself to be very good selling.

really can't think of any solid and logical reasons. want to read what others think.

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Jun 15, 11:17 PM
#3

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Jul 2012
4437
It's likely tied to sales to some degree due to the structure of how anime is produced.
In the case of adaptations the publisher has to input a significant portion of the money to fund it so they are hoping for a sales boost to the original work and to start they only use works that already have decent sales.
In the case of light novels since 2 LN examples were used if a series has easily available sales metrics it probably has like 500k+ volumes in circulation already when they announced the first season of the anime.
They can reasonably assume the anime will boost the sales of the source, meanwhile a sequel can draw attention but it will be a fraction of the attention gained from a first season in most cases. They also likely get a cut from things like blu-ray/merch sales so there's some level of return on investment there. All of which is too situational and varied to really narrow down can just assume they need to see some value in funding a sequel.

You can also have weird outliers like Shounen Jump series where no matter what they do they're still printing money so they can basically produce whatever they want whenever they want.
Jun 15, 11:24 PM
#4

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Oct 2017
2604
Reply to GamerDLM
It's likely tied to sales to some degree due to the structure of how anime is produced.
In the case of adaptations the publisher has to input a significant portion of the money to fund it so they are hoping for a sales boost to the original work and to start they only use works that already have decent sales.
In the case of light novels since 2 LN examples were used if a series has easily available sales metrics it probably has like 500k+ volumes in circulation already when they announced the first season of the anime.
They can reasonably assume the anime will boost the sales of the source, meanwhile a sequel can draw attention but it will be a fraction of the attention gained from a first season in most cases. They also likely get a cut from things like blu-ray/merch sales so there's some level of return on investment there. All of which is too situational and varied to really narrow down can just assume they need to see some value in funding a sequel.

You can also have weird outliers like Shounen Jump series where no matter what they do they're still printing money so they can basically produce whatever they want whenever they want.
@GamerDLM
Reasonable analysis.
But it doesn't explain why some LN that already ended for awhile got a sudden s2~3 adaptation after so many years.
For example Mao is a Part-timer s2~3.
Jun 16, 4:13 AM
#5

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Sep 2016
5507
What are the requirements for an anime to get "reanimated"?

They are usually popular shows from 15+ years ago with "outdated" animation, so that the reanimation is likely to pay off.
ZarutakuJun 16, 10:30 AM
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Jun 16, 5:31 AM
#6
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Jul 2018
564477
From what I have seen it is nostalgia.
Jun 16, 9:33 AM
#7

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Jul 2012
4437
Reply to Ventus_S
@GamerDLM
Reasonable analysis.
But it doesn't explain why some LN that already ended for awhile got a sudden s2~3 adaptation after so many years.
For example Mao is a Part-timer s2~3.
@Ventus_S
This is speculation but in Hataraku Maou-sama's case it's likely a series of strong timing coincidences.
The light novel series printed it's final main story volume in 2020 which happened to be near Dengeki Bunko's 30th anniversary.
At the 30th anniversary event they announced a new special volume for Maou-sama as part of the event which was just after the second season ended.
So there's a strong chance that it was setup for a lot of cross promotion on the publisher end starting probably with the final volume being published leading up to the event.
Jun 16, 3:51 PM
#8

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Jul 2021
871
I don't have anything concrete to add, but I expect a whole lot of stars have to align before an anime project gets greenlit and released. Availability of the studio and the staff, financial incentive for the studio, the publisher, and others in the production committee, contractual disputes, production difficulties, prioritization of other projects, changing market trends to chase, etc. Even recovery from an unspeakable tragedy, like Kyoto Animation.

"Timing" is just one of many factors, I assume. Things might take too long to get resolved for a project, or maybe things just never get resolved and they're left with no choice but to "reanimate" an older series.
Jun 16, 5:34 PM
#9

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Dec 2012
9451
Basically it's just: "Author/publisher/rights holder wants more money" and there's a "new generation" for them to fleece.

Sometimes we as fans luck out because it was given to someone who cares enough about the work and has enough funding to actually finish the whole story for the remake like Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood and the recent Fruits Basket remake.
KruszerJun 16, 5:46 PM
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Jun 16, 7:32 PM

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Jul 2023
75
The Hell Girl series is a mind-boggling case. Here is what I typed in my review of the fourth season:

"It seems that it wasn't planned out properly and Studio Deen just made it for the sake of having a fourth season. Look at the time between the ending of Three Vessels and the beginning of Fourth Twilight, the former finished airing at the end of Spring 2009 and the latter started on Summer 2017. That's eight years compared to one season between the first two seasons and one year between the second and third seasons. Plus, the first two seasons ended on cliffhangers telling the audience that the series will continue. Three Vessels had no such indicator of a future continuation, so anybody watching at the time would've assumed that's where the Hell Girl timeline ends, and after a strong finale too."

Let me clarify about the dates in between the original trilogy.
The first season ended in Spring 2006 and the second season began in Fall 2006.
The second season ended in Spring 2007 and the third season began in Fall 2008.

Plus, each of the first three seasons has 26 episodes compared to the fourth season's 6. I really can't figure out what the people of Studio Deen were thinking other than the possibility they really wanted a fourth entry. What's even more insulting is that Crunchyroll has the disgraceful fourth season and does not have the original trilogy, so that literally defeats the purpose of trying to bring in new fans.
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Jun 16, 7:51 PM

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Aug 2020
7962
money ‎ ‎ ‎ ‎ ‎ ‎ ‎ ‎‎ ‎ ‎ ‎ ‎ ‎

Jun 16, 9:09 PM
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Oct 2019
839
It's hard to tell. Especially with Kadokawa's stuff. The Devil is a Part-Timer got its second season 9 years after the first, for seemingly no reason. There was no upcoming products to promote, the light novels had ended like 2 years ago at that point, the ending was controversial, and it's generally not as popular or profitable as some of their other franchises, like Re:Zero, Overlord, and No Game No Life.

Whereas No Game No Life still doesn't have a second season despite the light novels consistently selling well, the IP still being super profitable for Kadokawa in general, and season 2 still being in high demand both in Japan and overseas after 10 fucking years, with even the author of the light novels expressing a desire to see a second season countless times since 2020.

But no, they'd rather produce 2 bad NGNL knock-offs (Liar Liar and God's Game We Play) than finally give the people what we want.

It just feels arbitrary and random at this point. Almost as if they're just blindly throwing darts at a board to decide what anime to produce, and we've just been insanely unlucky that a dart hasn't landed on NGNL season 2 yet.
Jun 16, 9:10 PM

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Sep 2018
10367
Likely from stuff like figure and merch sales.
Jun 16, 9:18 PM

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Jan 2009
94290
relevant https://x.com/aottt5478/status/1368596003763331076

A thread of anime directors talking about
- why some anime never get a season 2
- why sometimes a sequel season takes a long time
- why many original anime have a rushed ending
- why more anime are split-cour nowdays
- the connection between the original author and anime staff

The main speaker is Yuu Aoki, as well as Hiroshi Nishikiori. They were talking on an App called Clubhouse, which is like a voice chat room.
Note that this was interpreted from Japanese into Chinese and then translated into English, so it might not be very accurate.

1. Aoki said that it takes at least 2 years from the planning to the broadcast of an anime.
Those well-known anime studios actually got a lot of projects on their hands, so nowadays it's the studios that have the right to choose which anime they want to make.
(But despite this, the animators and other staff still get little money, which is quite sad)

2. In fact, when planning, it's already decided whether an anime will have a season 2 or if it's split-cour.
But if it's the case that the anime is planned to be only 1 season at first but then it unexpectedly makes lots of money, so the production committee wants a season 2
by the same studio, they have to wait several years until the studio isn't occupied (a studio change otherwise).
Also in this case it would be very difficult to gather the original main staff that were disbanded after season 1, even if there's enough money/budget offered.
That's why some anime never got a sequel season.
Generally it won't be announced that how many seasons the anime will have (especially to ones that will actually have multiple seasons) in the publicity phase before broadcast, coz a sequel announcement after Season 1 can make viewers expectant again.
Also to avoid leaks, these info won't be revealed to the staff except some few core people.
Aoki also mentioned anime like Index, Railgun and Overload, which are very popular, but it took so long between 2 seasons.
In these cases, the production committee actually wanted to release the next season asap. But to keep the same quality
they also wanted to keep the same production team.
However, as mentioned above, and it sometimes takes a long time to make sure all the people in the team are available.
But if the anime has a lifespan (note: meaning the popularity would drop soon if there's no new season), and the production committee knows the viewers can't wait anymore, they will prioritize keeping the director and character designer and then find a new studio.

3. Then Aoki mentioned some original anime, which could've been much better if it's 2-cour but actually ended up rushing to the end in 1-cour. It's because the original anime can't take advantages of the original work's popularity.
Investing in making multiple cours without knowing if it could make money is a big gamble. Unless it's famous director and crew, the production committee won't take any risk like this.

4. why split-cour?
1) The highest profitability of an anime, as merchandise, only lasts for 3 months, and the production committee wants to make full use of the anime's publicity for twice by splitting it. 2) The schedule won't be too tight and the staff can take a break.
Hiroshi Nishikiori added that he, as the director of Index, really feels the same about the gap time between seasons. Also he said Railgun was planned to be 2 seasons at first.
For season 3, it's really just a case of waiting all the main staff to be available, but in the end there's still part of them had to be replaced, coz it's been too long and those who were newbies before are now veterans and it's more difficult to arrange those staff's schedule.

5. Someone asked how much power the original authors have to intervene in the anime production.
Aoki answered that the anime staff really don't want them to intervene too much coz the more they, as laymen, talk, the more the staff will have to follow their instructions.
Of course, there're cases where the staff and the author really respect each other and work together on the anime, but such are very rare.
Also for many authors, it's very rare to have the opportunity of their works getting animated, and it might even be the once in their lives, which could make them too enthusiastic to be rational about its production.
But to the staff, it's just part of their tons of work in general. They don't see it in the same way.
What's best for the author is to have a connection with the director and script writer so that his/her intentions/ideas can be properly conveyed to the staff to the maximum.
Aoki said there are 2 trends in anime industry, one is to consider the people on the original work's side as amateurs, and anime production should be left to professionals
and the other is to communicate with original author and add their own ideas in the anime as an anime creator on the basis of respecting the original work. He put himself in the latter one.
Nishikiori said he agreed with the latter one as well.
When making adapted anime, he thought it would be more interesting to express the core of the original in a way that only anime can do, rather than just copying, and he hoped that the viewers could understand.
And he often saw viewers complain like "I really like this part of manga/novel, why did the anime change it?" In fact, these changes were sometimes requested by the author, who also wanted to see something unique and different in anime.
Jun 16, 9:19 PM

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Jan 2009
94290
He also mentioned that although sequels are almost impossible to greenlight if the previous anime did not make a profit, certain titles and brands can be rebooted later, when the market demographics have changed. He brought up Fate/stay night as an example of a series that wasn't a massive financial success with its original anime adaptation, but later became a lot more successful thanks to a new anime. https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/interest/2021-07-06/anime-producer-explains-the-business-of-greenlighting-sequels/.174841
Jun 16, 10:30 PM

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Jul 2021
871
@deg Very interesting and makes a lot of sense, thanks for that.

A 8-12 year delay still sounds a little strange, but I guess they must consider every option available to them. In the end, they can only rely on cold hard data and scheduling.
Jun 16, 11:12 PM

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Nov 2020
999
I will prefer "What are the requirements for an anime to get Monster Reborn?"

Anyways, mostly bc of nostalgia and other is high selling of the manga/light novel.
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Jun 16, 11:55 PM

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Jan 2009
94290
Reply to perseii
@deg Very interesting and makes a lot of sense, thanks for that.

A 8-12 year delay still sounds a little strange, but I guess they must consider every option available to them. In the end, they can only rely on cold hard data and scheduling.
@perseii no problem if even a few can read all those links i consider it a win for knowledge sharing
Jun 17, 7:45 AM

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Jul 2013
3911
If it is popular enough, it will get re-animated.
Jun 17, 3:39 PM
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Nov 2018
7
Funny how most answers in this thread is just guessing into the void, being vague as fuck, or just making shit up.
Consulting actual answers(more educated guesses) and sources is just to difficult apparently
Jun 19, 3:57 AM

Offline
Oct 2017
2604
Reply to deg
relevant https://x.com/aottt5478/status/1368596003763331076

A thread of anime directors talking about
- why some anime never get a season 2
- why sometimes a sequel season takes a long time
- why many original anime have a rushed ending
- why more anime are split-cour nowdays
- the connection between the original author and anime staff

The main speaker is Yuu Aoki, as well as Hiroshi Nishikiori. They were talking on an App called Clubhouse, which is like a voice chat room.
Note that this was interpreted from Japanese into Chinese and then translated into English, so it might not be very accurate.

1. Aoki said that it takes at least 2 years from the planning to the broadcast of an anime.
Those well-known anime studios actually got a lot of projects on their hands, so nowadays it's the studios that have the right to choose which anime they want to make.
(But despite this, the animators and other staff still get little money, which is quite sad)

2. In fact, when planning, it's already decided whether an anime will have a season 2 or if it's split-cour.
But if it's the case that the anime is planned to be only 1 season at first but then it unexpectedly makes lots of money, so the production committee wants a season 2
by the same studio, they have to wait several years until the studio isn't occupied (a studio change otherwise).
Also in this case it would be very difficult to gather the original main staff that were disbanded after season 1, even if there's enough money/budget offered.
That's why some anime never got a sequel season.
Generally it won't be announced that how many seasons the anime will have (especially to ones that will actually have multiple seasons) in the publicity phase before broadcast, coz a sequel announcement after Season 1 can make viewers expectant again.
Also to avoid leaks, these info won't be revealed to the staff except some few core people.
Aoki also mentioned anime like Index, Railgun and Overload, which are very popular, but it took so long between 2 seasons.
In these cases, the production committee actually wanted to release the next season asap. But to keep the same quality
they also wanted to keep the same production team.
However, as mentioned above, and it sometimes takes a long time to make sure all the people in the team are available.
But if the anime has a lifespan (note: meaning the popularity would drop soon if there's no new season), and the production committee knows the viewers can't wait anymore, they will prioritize keeping the director and character designer and then find a new studio.

3. Then Aoki mentioned some original anime, which could've been much better if it's 2-cour but actually ended up rushing to the end in 1-cour. It's because the original anime can't take advantages of the original work's popularity.
Investing in making multiple cours without knowing if it could make money is a big gamble. Unless it's famous director and crew, the production committee won't take any risk like this.

4. why split-cour?
1) The highest profitability of an anime, as merchandise, only lasts for 3 months, and the production committee wants to make full use of the anime's publicity for twice by splitting it. 2) The schedule won't be too tight and the staff can take a break.
Hiroshi Nishikiori added that he, as the director of Index, really feels the same about the gap time between seasons. Also he said Railgun was planned to be 2 seasons at first.
For season 3, it's really just a case of waiting all the main staff to be available, but in the end there's still part of them had to be replaced, coz it's been too long and those who were newbies before are now veterans and it's more difficult to arrange those staff's schedule.

5. Someone asked how much power the original authors have to intervene in the anime production.
Aoki answered that the anime staff really don't want them to intervene too much coz the more they, as laymen, talk, the more the staff will have to follow their instructions.
Of course, there're cases where the staff and the author really respect each other and work together on the anime, but such are very rare.
Also for many authors, it's very rare to have the opportunity of their works getting animated, and it might even be the once in their lives, which could make them too enthusiastic to be rational about its production.
But to the staff, it's just part of their tons of work in general. They don't see it in the same way.
What's best for the author is to have a connection with the director and script writer so that his/her intentions/ideas can be properly conveyed to the staff to the maximum.
Aoki said there are 2 trends in anime industry, one is to consider the people on the original work's side as amateurs, and anime production should be left to professionals
and the other is to communicate with original author and add their own ideas in the anime as an anime creator on the basis of respecting the original work. He put himself in the latter one.
Nishikiori said he agreed with the latter one as well.
When making adapted anime, he thought it would be more interesting to express the core of the original in a way that only anime can do, rather than just copying, and he hoped that the viewers could understand.
And he often saw viewers complain like "I really like this part of manga/novel, why did the anime change it?" In fact, these changes were sometimes requested by the author, who also wanted to see something unique and different in anime.
@deg
Very helpful insight :>
Why Mal dont have "star comment" feature to push best comment to top?
Ventus_SJun 19, 4:07 AM
Jun 19, 4:02 AM

Offline
Oct 2017
2604
Reply to Flick_on
Funny how most answers in this thread is just guessing into the void, being vague as fuck, or just making shit up.
Consulting actual answers(more educated guesses) and sources is just to difficult apparently
@Flick_on I mean this is how free internet board is like, you cant expect people to do thorough research before they respond.
I'm actually surprised i got the "insight response" from actual Japan interview, which contains more information than 95% of the comments made on internet.
Jun 19, 10:34 AM

Offline
Jul 2013
3911
>what does an anime need to do to be reanimated?

That it is good. Like Date a Live. Or Senran Kagura.

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