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#1
Jul 2, 4:34 PM
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Joined: Apr 2021
Posts: 367
For the series’ first several arcs, protagonist Eren Yeager was driven by two things: First, to destroy every single Titan he could find to avenge his mother’s death and the destruction of his hometown. And second, to make his way back to the ruins of his house to use a key his father gave him to discover what was hidden in their basement. Even with all the complications thrown his way — including learning he could transform into a Titan — Eren never wavered in this.

In the series’ 85th chapter, Eren finally got his answer. Making his way to the basement at long last, Eren discovered a photograph (something he’d never heard of) of his father with another wife and son. The following chapters showed the journal of Eren’s father, Grisha, revealing that he was actually from the outside world.

That is to say, what Eren and the other characters thought all along — that humanity was largely destroyed by the Titans, with its remnants sealed up behind three rings of walls to defend themselves from the monsters — was wrong. Grisha, the journal explained, was actually from the nation of Marley, and, like our main characters, was a member of a race known as Eldians.

The Eldians, the journal revealed, once ruled the world, their reign stretching back nearly 2,000 years. In that era, a woman named Ymir Fritz somehow acquired the power to become a Titan (just exactly how has never been clearly said) and used it to establish the nation of Eldia. 13 years later, Ymir died (the fate of all who can become Titans), which split her soul into the Nine Titans, whose power was given to nine subjects. Passing down their powers through noble bloodlines, the Nine Titans established the world-conquering, blood-soaked legacy of the Eldian Empire, and, in particular, devastated the nation of Marley.
Infighting eventually consumed the Titan nobility, and eventually, the 145th Eldian King, Karl Fritz, was ashamed of his people’s legacy and how they’d conquered Marley. He orchestrated a civil war that destroyed the Eldian Empire, allowing Marley to swoop in and acquire the majority of the Nine Titans.

Fritz took the majority of Eldians — the ancestors of the series’ main characters — to the island of Paradis, where he rewrote their memories to make them think they were the last of humanity, forcibly turned thousands of Eldians into Colossus Titans, and built the three walls over them. Back in Marley, the remaining Eldians were herded into ghettos, forced to wear identifying armbands with star-shaped symbols (we’ll come back to that) and were shunned as second class citizens. Eldian criminals were taken to Paradis, injected with Titan spinal fluid, and turned into mindless Titans to ravage the island for eternity.

In the modern day, Grisha, Eren’s father, was swept up in a movement to topple the Marleyan government and restore the Eldian monarchy. He even marred the royal heiress and had a son, Eren’s older half-brother Zeke. But when he was 7, Zeke betrayed his parents and their movement to the Marleyan government, and Grisha and his wife were taken to Paradis.

But while his royal first wife was transformed into a Titan (the same one who ate Eren’s mother at Titan’s start), Grisha was spared by a Marleyan soldier. That soldier was the head of an anti-Marley/pro-Monarchy movement, and he sent Grisha on a mission to find the descendants of Eldian royalty in Paradis and steal the power of the Founding Titan.

Eventually, Grisha accomplished his mission, only to learn that his second wife had been devoured. He went mad with grief and injected Eren with Titan fluid, which gave him the powers of the Attack Titan and turned him into a mindless monster, whereupon he ate Grisha.

After Grisha’s journal gave Eren and his friends the knowledge that their civilization wasn’t alone after all, they staged a massive military coup of their own government. Seizing control of Paradis, they began plans to close the 100-year technological gap between them and the rest of the world, and to reestablish the Eldian nation.

Attack on Titan, based on the manga of the same name, is no different, having taken inspiration from Germanic imagery for its world since the show began, but when Season 3 appropriated imagery and lexicon we associate with the Axis powers of World War II and the Holocaust, it sparked outrage. Thankfully, it seems like the show’s fourth and final season is finally unwrapping its real-world imagery to reveal the show’s stance on its core theme.

After the huge revelation last season that there is a world beyond the walls of the show’s city-state settings, but it’s a world where Eldians, people with the same blood and ancestry as our main characters, are treated as inferior and penned in concentration camps, Attack on Titan’s final season pulls another surprise on the audience. The newest episodes throw us into the other side of the conflict and takes us to Marley, where we meet characters with the same Eldian heritage as our main characters, but who live and work under the oppression of Marley itself. These are the people we previously saw as monstrous villains, and the new season dares the audience to understand them.

The show is still heavily borrowing from WWII and Holocaust imagery to tell its story of the Eldian people’s subjugation. It’s hard not to think of Nazi soldiers marching when watching the Marleyan soldiers in the new opening sequence, a shot followed by flying war zeppelins and several exploding bombs. The Eldian people living in the Liberio internment zone, wearing armbands to identify themselves as Eldian, and there is a shot of Eldian soldiers in the Marleyan military doing a salute to their officers.
The backlash against Attack on Titan came down to a debate of whether the show’s sympathies would ultimately side with its oppressed or its oppressors, and the concern that it was co-opting fascist imagery from real-world history to demonize a fictional oppressed group, just as the Nazis did in the years leading up to the Holocaust
 
#2
Jul 2, 6:25 PM
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Joined: Jul 2018
Posts: 0
What exactly was the point you were trying to make here? I agree with every point you made. I think the backlash has to do more with the manga ending (the last 10 chapters especially) which subverted every theme the show was trying to make and making it into a convoluted love story bullshit
 
#3
Jul 3, 5:28 AM

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Joined: Mar 2021
Posts: 1066
Jevasamy said:
For the series’ first several arcs, protagonist Eren Yeager was driven by two things: First, to destroy every single Titan he could find to avenge his mother’s death and the destruction of his hometown. And second, to make his way back to the ruins of his house to use a key his father gave him to discover what was hidden in their basement. Even with all the complications thrown his way — including learning he could transform into a Titan — Eren never wavered in this.

In the series’ 85th chapter, Eren finally got his answer. Making his way to the basement at long last, Eren discovered a photograph (something he’d never heard of) of his father with another wife and son. The following chapters showed the journal of Eren’s father, Grisha, revealing that he was actually from the outside world.

That is to say, what Eren and the other characters thought all along — that humanity was largely destroyed by the Titans, with its remnants sealed up behind three rings of walls to defend themselves from the monsters — was wrong. Grisha, the journal explained, was actually from the nation of Marley, and, like our main characters, was a member of a race known as Eldians.

The Eldians, the journal revealed, once ruled the world, their reign stretching back nearly 2,000 years. In that era, a woman named Ymir Fritz somehow acquired the power to become a Titan (just exactly how has never been clearly said) and used it to establish the nation of Eldia. 13 years later, Ymir died (the fate of all who can become Titans), which split her soul into the Nine Titans, whose power was given to nine subjects. Passing down their powers through noble bloodlines, the Nine Titans established the world-conquering, blood-soaked legacy of the Eldian Empire, and, in particular, devastated the nation of Marley.
Infighting eventually consumed the Titan nobility, and eventually, the 145th Eldian King, Karl Fritz, was ashamed of his people’s legacy and how they’d conquered Marley. He orchestrated a civil war that destroyed the Eldian Empire, allowing Marley to swoop in and acquire the majority of the Nine Titans.

Fritz took the majority of Eldians — the ancestors of the series’ main characters — to the island of Paradis, where he rewrote their memories to make them think they were the last of humanity, forcibly turned thousands of Eldians into Colossus Titans, and built the three walls over them. Back in Marley, the remaining Eldians were herded into ghettos, forced to wear identifying armbands with star-shaped symbols (we’ll come back to that) and were shunned as second class citizens. Eldian criminals were taken to Paradis, injected with Titan spinal fluid, and turned into mindless Titans to ravage the island for eternity.

In the modern day, Grisha, Eren’s father, was swept up in a movement to topple the Marleyan government and restore the Eldian monarchy. He even marred the royal heiress and had a son, Eren’s older half-brother Zeke. But when he was 7, Zeke betrayed his parents and their movement to the Marleyan government, and Grisha and his wife were taken to Paradis.

But while his royal first wife was transformed into a Titan (the same one who ate Eren’s mother at Titan’s start), Grisha was spared by a Marleyan soldier. That soldier was the head of an anti-Marley/pro-Monarchy movement, and he sent Grisha on a mission to find the descendants of Eldian royalty in Paradis and steal the power of the Founding Titan.

Eventually, Grisha accomplished his mission, only to learn that his second wife had been devoured. He went mad with grief and injected Eren with Titan fluid, which gave him the powers of the Attack Titan and turned him into a mindless monster, whereupon he ate Grisha.

After Grisha’s journal gave Eren and his friends the knowledge that their civilization wasn’t alone after all, they staged a massive military coup of their own government. Seizing control of Paradis, they began plans to close the 100-year technological gap between them and the rest of the world, and to reestablish the Eldian nation.

Attack on Titan, based on the manga of the same name, is no different, having taken inspiration from Germanic imagery for its world since the show began, but when Season 3 appropriated imagery and lexicon we associate with the Axis powers of World War II and the Holocaust, it sparked outrage. Thankfully, it seems like the show’s fourth and final season is finally unwrapping its real-world imagery to reveal the show’s stance on its core theme.

After the huge revelation last season that there is a world beyond the walls of the show’s city-state settings, but it’s a world where Eldians, people with the same blood and ancestry as our main characters, are treated as inferior and penned in concentration camps, Attack on Titan’s final season pulls another surprise on the audience. The newest episodes throw us into the other side of the conflict and takes us to Marley, where we meet characters with the same Eldian heritage as our main characters, but who live and work under the oppression of Marley itself. These are the people we previously saw as monstrous villains, and the new season dares the audience to understand them.

The show is still heavily borrowing from WWII and Holocaust imagery to tell its story of the Eldian people’s subjugation. It’s hard not to think of Nazi soldiers marching when watching the Marleyan soldiers in the new opening sequence, a shot followed by flying war zeppelins and several exploding bombs. The Eldian people living in the Liberio internment zone, wearing armbands to identify themselves as Eldian, and there is a shot of Eldian soldiers in the Marleyan military doing a salute to their officers.
The backlash against Attack on Titan came down to a debate of whether the show’s sympathies would ultimately side with its oppressed or its oppressors, and the concern that it was co-opting fascist imagery from real-world history to demonize a fictional oppressed group, just as the Nazis did in the years leading up to the Holocaust


Lmao Your Analysis is similar to some Flat Trying to prove why Earth is Flat
 
#4
Jul 3, 5:43 AM
Offline
Joined: Apr 2021
Posts: 367
Aerosmith224 said:
Jevasamy said:
For the series’ first several arcs, protagonist Eren Yeager was driven by two things: First, to destroy every single Titan he could find to avenge his mother’s death and the destruction of his hometown. And second, to make his way back to the ruins of his house to use a key his father gave him to discover what was hidden in their basement. Even with all the complications thrown his way — including learning he could transform into a Titan — Eren never wavered in this.

In the series’ 85th chapter, Eren finally got his answer. Making his way to the basement at long last, Eren discovered a photograph (something he’d never heard of) of his father with another wife and son. The following chapters showed the journal of Eren’s father, Grisha, revealing that he was actually from the outside world.

That is to say, what Eren and the other characters thought all along — that humanity was largely destroyed by the Titans, with its remnants sealed up behind three rings of walls to defend themselves from the monsters — was wrong. Grisha, the journal explained, was actually from the nation of Marley, and, like our main characters, was a member of a race known as Eldians.

The Eldians, the journal revealed, once ruled the world, their reign stretching back nearly 2,000 years. In that era, a woman named Ymir Fritz somehow acquired the power to become a Titan (just exactly how has never been clearly said) and used it to establish the nation of Eldia. 13 years later, Ymir died (the fate of all who can become Titans), which split her soul into the Nine Titans, whose power was given to nine subjects. Passing down their powers through noble bloodlines, the Nine Titans established the world-conquering, blood-soaked legacy of the Eldian Empire, and, in particular, devastated the nation of Marley.
Infighting eventually consumed the Titan nobility, and eventually, the 145th Eldian King, Karl Fritz, was ashamed of his people’s legacy and how they’d conquered Marley. He orchestrated a civil war that destroyed the Eldian Empire, allowing Marley to swoop in and acquire the majority of the Nine Titans.

Fritz took the majority of Eldians — the ancestors of the series’ main characters — to the island of Paradis, where he rewrote their memories to make them think they were the last of humanity, forcibly turned thousands of Eldians into Colossus Titans, and built the three walls over them. Back in Marley, the remaining Eldians were herded into ghettos, forced to wear identifying armbands with star-shaped symbols (we’ll come back to that) and were shunned as second class citizens. Eldian criminals were taken to Paradis, injected with Titan spinal fluid, and turned into mindless Titans to ravage the island for eternity.

In the modern day, Grisha, Eren’s father, was swept up in a movement to topple the Marleyan government and restore the Eldian monarchy. He even marred the royal heiress and had a son, Eren’s older half-brother Zeke. But when he was 7, Zeke betrayed his parents and their movement to the Marleyan government, and Grisha and his wife were taken to Paradis.

But while his royal first wife was transformed into a Titan (the same one who ate Eren’s mother at Titan’s start), Grisha was spared by a Marleyan soldier. That soldier was the head of an anti-Marley/pro-Monarchy movement, and he sent Grisha on a mission to find the descendants of Eldian royalty in Paradis and steal the power of the Founding Titan.

Eventually, Grisha accomplished his mission, only to learn that his second wife had been devoured. He went mad with grief and injected Eren with Titan fluid, which gave him the powers of the Attack Titan and turned him into a mindless monster, whereupon he ate Grisha.

After Grisha’s journal gave Eren and his friends the knowledge that their civilization wasn’t alone after all, they staged a massive military coup of their own government. Seizing control of Paradis, they began plans to close the 100-year technological gap between them and the rest of the world, and to reestablish the Eldian nation.

Attack on Titan, based on the manga of the same name, is no different, having taken inspiration from Germanic imagery for its world since the show began, but when Season 3 appropriated imagery and lexicon we associate with the Axis powers of World War II and the Holocaust, it sparked outrage. Thankfully, it seems like the show’s fourth and final season is finally unwrapping its real-world imagery to reveal the show’s stance on its core theme.

After the huge revelation last season that there is a world beyond the walls of the show’s city-state settings, but it’s a world where Eldians, people with the same blood and ancestry as our main characters, are treated as inferior and penned in concentration camps, Attack on Titan’s final season pulls another surprise on the audience. The newest episodes throw us into the other side of the conflict and takes us to Marley, where we meet characters with the same Eldian heritage as our main characters, but who live and work under the oppression of Marley itself. These are the people we previously saw as monstrous villains, and the new season dares the audience to understand them.

The show is still heavily borrowing from WWII and Holocaust imagery to tell its story of the Eldian people’s subjugation. It’s hard not to think of Nazi soldiers marching when watching the Marleyan soldiers in the new opening sequence, a shot followed by flying war zeppelins and several exploding bombs. The Eldian people living in the Liberio internment zone, wearing armbands to identify themselves as Eldian, and there is a shot of Eldian soldiers in the Marleyan military doing a salute to their officers.
The backlash against Attack on Titan came down to a debate of whether the show’s sympathies would ultimately side with its oppressed or its oppressors, and the concern that it was co-opting fascist imagery from real-world history to demonize a fictional oppressed group, just as the Nazis did in the years leading up to the Holocaust


Lmao Your Analysis is similar to some Flat Trying to prove why Earth is Flat


Don't know if it's insult or compliment. I am going with compliment

The earth isn't flat .Dude , i was telling about themes . Why would earth flaters exist in 2021 ?

Or wait 😏😏😏 their own earth , must be flat ? My dirty mind .
 
 
#5
Jul 3, 5:45 AM
Offline
Joined: Apr 2021
Posts: 367
BlackCrow1 said:
What exactly was the point you were trying to make here? I agree with every point you made. I think the backlash has to do more with the manga ending (the last 10 chapters especially) which subverted every theme the show was trying to make and making it into a convoluted love story bullshit


I WAS TELLING THE THEME OF WAR .

That's the black slash , some time back , some fans were like its showing .....like these THAT ALL THOSE WHO
sympathize with Marley are Nazi or YEAGERIST are facist .

AND yes , I AGREE WUTH YOU FOR THE ENDING . , Like seriously dude , WHERE DID YMIR AND FRITZ Love story come from ? Heck he abused her . I wish he kept orginal ending and killed everyone .
Modified by Jevasamy, Jul 3, 5:50 AM
 

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