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#1
Jul 19, 3:15 PM
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I've seen underrated animes which are so good but lacks attention. So I wanted to know from your perspective what do you think an anime that is popular has that an underrated anime doesn't or is there an underlying problem or is it the appeal to the audience or something else?
 
#2
Jul 19, 3:25 PM

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1) Balance between the familiarity and unfamiliarity
I think the most common reason an anime becomes popular when it manages to find a balance between the familiarity and the unfamiliarity.
For example, Attack On Titan seems to have a very original and unique concept, but the idea of humanity fighting against a supernatural threat is a familiar concept (zombie flicks, for example), yet AOT is still unfamiliar due to the idea of humanity fighting against giants

2) Unique but still grounded
What about anime with 100% original concepts then? In that case, those anime become grounded with characters who have familiar or relatable personalities, like in SAO (in SAO's case, their personalities are familiar in that they're generic >_<).

3) Excitement
I think one of the biggest common factors that most popular anime have, is that they're exciting, in that they have a level of intensity to them.
For example, sure, Promised Neverland is not an action anime, but it is an extremely intense thriller about kids trying to escape.

4) Capitalizing on something popular
Like My Hero Academia, an anime can just branch off from a concept already familiar and loved without doing much else (in this case, that being superheroes).
"You don't need a reason to live, you just live"
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#3
Jul 19, 3:31 PM

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HopefulNihilist said:
1) Balance between the familiarity and unfamiliarity
I think the most common reason an anime becomes popular when it manages to find a balance between the familiarity and the unfamiliarity.
For example, Attack On Titan seems to have a very original and unique concept, but the idea of humanity fighting against a supernatural threat is a familiar concept (zombie flicks, for example), yet AOT is still unfamiliar due to the idea of humanity fighting against giants

2) Unique but still grounded
What about anime with 100% original concepts then? In that case, those anime become grounded with characters who have familiar or relatable personalities, like in SAO (in SAO's case, their personalities are familiar in that they're generic >_<).

3) Excitement
I think one of the biggest common factors that most popular anime have, is that they're exciting, in that they have a level of intensity to them.
For example, sure, Promised Neverland is not an action anime, but it is an extremely intense thriller about kids trying to escape.

4) Capitalizing on something popular
Like My Hero Academia, an anime can just branch off from a concept already familiar and loved without doing much else (in this case, that being superheroes).


Ty Nihilist, I'll just hop on your answer with a +1.
 
#4
Jul 19, 3:34 PM

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BlakexEkalb said:
HopefulNihilist said:
1) Balance between the familiarity and unfamiliarity
I think the most common reason an anime becomes popular when it manages to find a balance between the familiarity and the unfamiliarity.
For example, Attack On Titan seems to have a very original and unique concept, but the idea of humanity fighting against a supernatural threat is a familiar concept (zombie flicks, for example), yet AOT is still unfamiliar due to the idea of humanity fighting against giants

2) Unique but still grounded
What about anime with 100% original concepts then? In that case, those anime become grounded with characters who have familiar or relatable personalities, like in SAO (in SAO's case, their personalities are familiar in that they're generic >_<).

3) Excitement
I think one of the biggest common factors that most popular anime have, is that they're exciting, in that they have a level of intensity to them.
For example, sure, Promised Neverland is not an action anime, but it is an extremely intense thriller about kids trying to escape.

4) Capitalizing on something popular
Like My Hero Academia, an anime can just branch off from a concept already familiar and loved without doing much else (in this case, that being superheroes).


Ty Nihilist, I'll just hop on your answer with a +1.


I agree with what you said so same for me +1

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#5
Jul 19, 3:35 PM

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Xstasy said:
BlakexEkalb said:


Ty Nihilist, I'll just hop on your answer with a +1.


I agree with what you said so same for me +1


This is the pinnacle of MAL discussions right here.
 
#6
Jul 19, 3:40 PM

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The premise

Doesn't make the anime good, but it's what get people to watch it in the first place. All the household name / most popular anime have some at least interesting premise. SAO with die in game = die irl. Death note with the book to kill anyone you want. Naruto with the ninja setting and a seemingly useless protagonist that turned out to be op.

A good premise in combination with just a somewhat decent execution can get it to the top of the chart. Where as a boring premise, with even the top execution, can't really become popular.
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#7
Jul 19, 3:47 PM

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Probably it is Luck.

Some animes like Re:Creators has everything it takes to become popular and can't succeed.

We have plenty of factors like: the marketing strategy, the season it will be aired etc.

It's hard to answer if you think straight.
 
#8
Jul 19, 3:50 PM
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BlakexEkalb said:
Xstasy said:


I agree with what you said so same for me +1


This is the pinnacle of MAL discussions right here.

I agree with what you said so same for me +1
 
#9
Jul 19, 3:58 PM

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Being enjoyable. Being licensed. Catchy OPs and EDs. Waifus/Husbandos. Great animations and soundtracks. And throw some controversiality in the middle because why not? (e.g. NGE, SAO, Fate).

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Jul 19, 4:01 PM
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great animation quality at least what the previews show like that attracted a lot of fans from what i observe to watching Fire Force and even Sword Art Online (season 1)
 
Jul 19, 4:02 PM

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deg said:
great animation quality at least what the previews show like that attracted a lot of fans from what i observe to watching Fire Force and even Sword Art Online (season 1)


I think it's more that great, but still familiar, art styles/animation is what attracts an anime. Kaiji and Monster aren't as popular, partially because their art styles probably turn off a lot of people.
"You don't need a reason to live, you just live"
-Nero Vanetti, 91 Days



 
Jul 19, 4:07 PM
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For an anime to be popular it has to be simple (it might sound a bit sad, but a lot of people like to watch things that don't require a lot of thinking. Look for example on stuff like Dragon Ball - interaction is very limited, conflicts are handled only by punching and kicking each other, and characters overcome one another through power levels and bullshit writing, and yet it is extremely popular because it is that simple), flashy - good animation helps. OPM season 1 vs season 2 is a prime example of that. Take OPM season 1, slap the season 2 animation into it and that anime would have failed miserably, and its topic - fighting animes tend to be much more popular than other genres, because seeing a few characters fighting one another while doing some unique tricks and using unnatural gimmicks make them look cool for most people, which in return makes the viewer interested in watching more episodes.

The rest varies on the taste of each personal viewer, and what they are looking for when watching an anime series.


Gyeferson said:
Probably it is Luck.

Some animes like Re:Creators has everything it takes to become popular and can't succeed.

We have plenty of factors like: the marketing strategy, the season it will be aired etc.

It's hard to answer if you think straight.



Re:Creators had a decent gimmick but suffered from bad execution and writing, so I wouldn't say it has to do with luck in this situation.


HopefulNihilist said:
1) Balance between the familiarity and unfamiliarity
I think the most common reason an anime becomes popular when it manages to find a balance between the familiarity and the unfamiliarity.
For example, Attack On Titan seems to have a very original and unique concept, but the idea of humanity fighting against a supernatural threat is a familiar concept (zombie flicks, for example), yet AOT is still unfamiliar due to the idea of humanity fighting against giants

2) Unique but still grounded
What about anime with 100% original concepts then? In that case, those anime become grounded with characters who have familiar or relatable personalities, like in SAO (in SAO's case, their personalities are familiar in that they're generic >_<).

3) Excitement
I think one of the biggest common factors that most popular anime have, is that they're exciting, in that they have a level of intensity to them.
For example, sure, Promised Neverland is not an action anime, but it is an extremely intense thriller about kids trying to escape.

4) Capitalizing on something popular
Like My Hero Academia, an anime can just branch off from a concept already familiar and loved without doing much else (in this case, that being superheroes).



While you are right, execution in an adaptation matters as much if not more for an anime to succeed. If we would have had AOT in another studio's hands, the anime would have mostly likely died down after a single season. Wit's good animation, pacing (ignoring parts of season 1, but it was due to Isayama's manga's fault) and performance overall made the anime reach a very high quality, which in return made people interested. A decent to good gimmick wouldn't do much on its own.
 
Jul 19, 4:08 PM

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almost every single popular show has a few things in common with the rest:

1) High Production Values - people want to watch anime that look and sound good. some shows receive the bulk of their pre-release hype from this, for example, violet evergarden. other shows are popular for beautiful dynamic action visuals, like this season's fire force.

2) Intriguing AND Simple Premise - the basic idea of the show has to be appealing, and interesting enough that it STANDS OUT FROM OTHER ANIME. this is why super generic isekai like kenja no mago are not as popular as their peers shield hero, re:zero or youjo senki, because those shows have interesting, different premises. additionally, it has to be simple enough that it can be explained in one or two sentences. this is not to say that popular anime are basic, but that they need to be easily communicable to spread to a wider audience. in addition, an basic premise is more likely to be appealing to a wide range of preferences than a complex, specific one. opm, aot, and death note are all great examples of intriguing but simple premises.

3) Good Marketing/Popular Source Material - not much needs to be said about this, but if more people know about it before it drops that's a plus for its hype.

4) The Studio/Industry People Involved - big names with good reputations in the anime industry drum up hype all by themselves; pretty much every studio bones show has seen at least decent popularity in the last 5 years. studios, directors and seiyuus can all have large followings that can dramatically increase a show's viewership. more often than not, the most popular anime are NOT made by newcomers to the industry.

5) It's Not a Demanding Watch - basically if an anime requires you to watch 80 episodes beforehand to enjoy it, it's not going to reach a large new audience. if an anime requires 110% of your attention and understanding of deep themes and analysis for you to enjoy it, it's not going to reach a large new audience. if an anime is really hard to find on streaming services (like it's only on amazon prime or something) it's not going to reach a large audience.

6) Anitubers and other Influencers like it - this is similar to point 4. the biggest shows of each season are almost always boosted by endorsements from members of the community who have large followings.
Modified by Dolabella, Jul 19, 4:20 PM
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Jul 19, 4:16 PM

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Armados said:

While you are right, execution in an adaptation matters as much if not more for an anime to succeed. If we would have had AOT in another studio's hands, the anime would have mostly likely died down after a single season. Wit's good animation, pacing (ignoring parts of season 1, but it was due to Isayama's manga's fault) and performance overall made the anime reach a very high quality, which in return made people interested. A decent to good gimmick wouldn't do much on its own.


I half-agree. Because anime like SAO are seen as terrible by critics, but still popular. I think I'd say that the way the execution is made matters more than the quality of the execution.
Referring back to something you said earlier in your post, isn't Re: Creators pretty popular?

Dolabella said:
almost every single popular show has a few things in common with the rest:

1) High Production Values - people want to watch anime that look and sound good. some shows receive the bulk of their pre-release hype from this, for example, violet evergarden. other shows are popular for beautiful dynamic action visuals, like this season's fire force.


This is something I should've put in my original post.

Dolabella said:
2) Intriguing AND Simple Premise - the basic idea of the show has to be appealing, and interesting enough that it STANDS OUT FROM OTHER ANIME. this is why super generic isekai like kenja no mago are not as popular as their peers shield hero, re:zero or youjo senki, because those shows have interesting, different premises. additionally, it has to be simple enough that it can be explained in one or two sentences. this is not to say that popular anime are basic, but that they need to be easily communicable to spread to a wider audience. in addition, an easy-to-follow premise will appeal to a wider audience than a complex one. opm, aot, and death note, are all great examples of intriguing but simple premises.


A simple premise? Interesting. That's something that's never occurred to me, but you're right.

Dolabella said:
3) Good Marketing/Popular Source Material - not much needs to be said about this, but if more people know about it before it drops that's a plus for its hype.


I mean, don't most anime have good marketing, what with the trailers and stuff?

Dolabella said:
4) The Studio/Industry People Involved - big names with good reputations in the anime industry drum up hype all by themselves; pretty much every studio bones show has seen at least decent popularity in the last 5 years. studios, directors and seiyuus can all have large followings that can dramatically increase a show's viewership. more often than not, the most popular anime are NOT made by newcomers to the industry.


Wow. You're really on a roll here.

Dolabella said:
5) It's Not a Demanding Watch - basically if an anime requires you to watch 80 episodes beforehand to enjoy it, it's not going to reach a large new audience. if an anime requires 110% of your attention and understanding of deep themes and analysis for you to enjoy it, it's not going to reach a large new audience. if an anime is really hard to find on streaming services (like it's only on amazon prime or something) it's not going to reach a large audience.


Definitely. This is probably the biggest reason Monster isn't as popular as Death Note.

Dolabella said:
6) Anitubers and other Influencers like it - this is similar to point 4. the biggest shows of each season are almost always boosted by endorsements from members of the community who have large followings.


Hmm. Now this is also something I didn't consider.
"You don't need a reason to live, you just live"
-Nero Vanetti, 91 Days



 
Jul 19, 4:18 PM
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HopefulNihilist said:
deg said:
great animation quality at least what the previews show like that attracted a lot of fans from what i observe to watching Fire Force and even Sword Art Online (season 1)


I think it's more that great, but still familiar, art styles/animation is what attracts an anime. Kaiji and Monster aren't as popular, partially because their art styles probably turn off a lot of people.


ye thats true one of the best example is Aku no Hana lol they did rotoscoping but did not bother making the faces of the characters "anime like"
 
Jul 19, 4:28 PM

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Anime is popular because it is not subtle, most anime characters express their emotions with very exaggerated facial expressions and body movements, they also tend to scream a lot which in my opinion is what makes anime attractive to a lot of people.
 
Jul 19, 4:38 PM
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HopefulNihilist said:
Armados said:

While you are right, execution in an adaptation matters as much if not more for an anime to succeed. If we would have had AOT in another studio's hands, the anime would have mostly likely died down after a single season. Wit's good animation, pacing (ignoring parts of season 1, but it was due to Isayama's manga's fault) and performance overall made the anime reach a very high quality, which in return made people interested. A decent to good gimmick wouldn't do much on its own.


I half-agree. Because anime like SAO are seen as terrible by critics, but still popular. I think I'd say that the way the execution is made matters more than the quality of the execution.
Referring back to something you said earlier in your post, isn't Re: Creators pretty popular?


Re: Creators was popular back in the day, but only to a certain extent. I think its viewers were insistent on how great and amazing this series is, and made so much noise over it that made people think it was way more popular than it actually was. Don't get me wrong - it wasn't a series that flopped, but it wasn't THAT popular or succesful. The series suffered from writing problems mostly, as the quality of the series was above average for the most part.


Also, SAO adaptation was well made, the problem for the anime was its original source, and not the adaptation of the studio. It had decent to good animation, voice acting and sound direction. It suffered from badly written characters, pacing and the lack of an actual plot.
 
Jul 19, 6:20 PM

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HopefulNihilist said:
deg said:
great animation quality at least what the previews show like that attracted a lot of fans from what i observe to watching Fire Force and even Sword Art Online (season 1)


I think it's more that great, but still familiar, art styles/animation is what attracts an anime. Kaiji and Monster aren't as popular, partially because their art styles probably turn off a lot of people.


100% people will watch a show if it looks amazing. Even if the story is below average/mediocre at best people will watch it just to look at the visuals.
 
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