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#1
Jan 11, 11:13 PM

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For me this show is so bad and full of holes that you can easily fill them in with your own jokes, and is only helped by the incredibly tryhard production value.

So many parts of the anime can seemingly be explained by imagining some guy in a suit in charge of production asking himself, "This is anime enough, right?"

Best quote of the show for me: "They're just a bunch of egoists," said the slutty tittymonster in a bunnysuit.

edit: Science
Modified by Need_for_Steed, Jan 11, 11:33 PM
 
#2
Jan 12, 3:52 AM

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Explain the plotholes, please.
 
#3
Jan 12, 3:53 AM
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So far, I'm two episodes in and totally agree with you. It's kinda funny how I can enjoy bad anime like this one more than average ones. Average anime are often completely boring, but here you can actually enjoy the bad writing because you're constantly asking yourself "How does that make any sense?" or "Why would the characters act that way? That's not how any normal person would act in that kind of situation".

I'm expecting the writing to get even worse as it goes on, but I guess it has been some time since I've seen a show that's so bad that it is good.
 
#4
Jan 12, 4:11 AM

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SteelingMax said:
Explain the plotholes, please.


Not necessarily plotholes but just holes in general, such as the aforementioned irrational and inconsistent behaviors of the characters that are reminiscent of Hiroya Oku's background characters, or the innumerable handwavy sci-fi mechanics attempting to support a premise that is wholly reliant upon them.

All of it begs for running commentary.
Modified by Need_for_Steed, Jan 12, 4:21 AM
 
#5
Jan 12, 8:12 AM

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This could definitely use the Joel and the Robots treatment. This makes Killing Bites writing look like Shakespeare
 
#6
Yesterday, 3:58 PM
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where can I watch this?? I havent found any site that has it
 
#7
Yesterday, 5:36 PM

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Need_for_Steed said:
For me this show is so bad and full of holes that you can easily fill them in with your own jokes, and is only helped by the incredibly tryhard production value.


To be honest, I think this forum topic is the single most "tryhard" thing about the show.

Nothing about Revisions seems especially unusual or beyond what is relatively standard fare for anime, both new and old. Frankly, it's a rather typical series in terms of each constituent element. There are some aspects I did find interesting, but the end result wasn't significantly better or significantly worse than many other sci-fi anime.

Even the character who dresses up in an admittedly shameless way, which isn't really a physical body in the first place so you already have half the answer for why such a thing is possible, seems rather tame compared to what we regularly see in terms of anime fanservice in far more popular shows from recent seasons. Maybe if I had seen a lot less anime over the years this would jump out at me, but on a scale of sexualization this would rank rather low. You can criticize it or make jokes, of course, but that seems to require more effort than a more neutral outlook towards this issue.

Perhaps, at this time in my life, I am getting very tired of pointless cynicism and juvenile posturing towards media. Unless something is notably bad, rather than merely average, I don't see the point in the MST3K approach. It seems quite overkill.

I'll get around to writing a detailed take on the series later. But for now, I am reading a number of complaints based more on matters of personal preference or interpretation. Which are fine, but they can be debated and contrasted with other opinions in order to reach a different conclusion and provide alternative perspectives. Certain specific criticisms are, in all honesty, rather inaccurate and seem to either ignore or misremember pieces of information provided by the series itself. You can't ask someone to watch any given series exclusively in a particular way, that would be a pointless exercise, but I'd expect a lot more accuracy and less sloppiness in the descriptions of basic facts.

Need_for_Steed said:

Not necessarily plotholes but just holes in general, such as the aforementioned irrational and inconsistent behaviors of the characters that are reminiscent of Hiroya Oku's background characters, or the innumerable handwavy sci-fi mechanics attempting to support a premise that is wholly reliant upon them.


I've addressed the first statement below. Regarding the second one, the sci-fi mechanics, in and of themselves, aren't anything we haven't seen before. They don't seem more handwavy than, say, what has been done before in Steins Gate, Higurashi, Madoka or even the classic Back to the Future movie trilogy.

TheEnhancedExe said:
Average anime are often completely boring, but here you can actually enjoy the bad writing because you're constantly asking yourself "How does that make any sense?" or "Why would the characters act that way? That's not how any normal person would act in that kind of situation".


This is far too lacking in specifics to properly address, but I can honestly say that doesn't resemble my own viewing experience at all. In fact, I find the "worst" parts of this anime to be average at most and didn't believe the characters were acting in any particularly senseless ways. Extreme or radical, sure, but that still follows a greater or lesser degree of logic. Even if it involves a series of developments that lead to scenarios we'd rather avoid or not see.

There's a difference. Disliking certain attitudes and characterizations, which I did feel at various points (especially with this type of protagonist), is one thing. Thinking it's senseless or inconsistent is another. By and large, I didn't notice that.

All human beings are capable of irrational actions. We have seen this before, especially after taking into account numerous other precedents from the anime industry or, for that matter, instances of similar behavior among modern societies.

I can understand some people may hold an idealized view of what "normal" individuals are supposed to be like. Everyone should be calm, collected, responsible, patient and cooperative. In theory, that's true, but one close look at the current state of real world politics in multiple countries around the globe does a lot to confirm the opposite. No, people can be quite silly, stupid, impulsive, impatient and selfish. To say nothing of looking back at the history of various disasters or moments of crisis. Not only teenagers but fully grown adults can be flawed to the point of annoyance in reality as well as in many works of fiction.

Modified by ZakuCustom, Yesterday, 5:52 PM
 
#8
Yesterday, 9:40 PM
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ZakuCustom said:

This is far too lacking in specifics to properly address, but I can honestly say that doesn't resemble my own viewing experience at all. In fact, I find the "worst" parts of this anime to be average at most and didn't believe the characters were acting in any particularly senseless ways. Extreme or radical, sure, but that still follows a greater or lesser degree of logic. Even if it involves a series of developments that lead to scenarios we'd rather avoid or not see.

There's a difference. Disliking certain attitudes and characterizations, which I did feel at various points (especially with this type of protagonist), is one thing. Thinking it's senseless or inconsistent is another. By and large, I didn't notice that.

All human beings are capable of irrational actions. We have seen this before, especially after taking into account numerous other precedents from the anime industry or, for that matter, instances of similar behavior among modern societies.

I can understand some people may hold an idealized view of what "normal" individuals are supposed to be like. Everyone should be calm, collected, responsible, patient and cooperative. In theory, that's true, but one close look at the current state of real world politics in multiple countries around the globe does a lot to confirm the opposite. No, people can be quite silly, stupid, impulsive, impatient and selfish. To say nothing of looking back at the history of various disasters or moments of crisis. Not only teenagers but fully grown adults can be flawed to the point of annoyance in reality as well as in many works of fiction.



Well, it's just that this anime tries to be too realistic in a situation that isn't realistic at all and thus the characters actions feel exactly like that. It looks like they researched how characters would act in a state of emergency in a real situation. But applied to this kind of situation their actions don't make a lot of sense and feel forced. Especially the civilians who just randomly demonstrate at the beginning in front of the mayor although it's obvious he can't answer any questions about what happened.

If my internet and phone calls didn't work, the last thing I would do would be going to the mayor. I would assume my provider is at fault. And if there were large ruins around the city how do people expect the mayor to answer that if communication doesn't work at all.

Then when the Revisions told the people they could go back in time when they gave them the mechs back, they were way too easy to believe them. They literally just accepted a small apology from them that they killed some people. Also this is way too fishy and was an obvious trap from the start, though this is more an issue of bad writing here since characters can't be aware of obvious anime tropes.

Also, on top of that, once they get the mechs back and fight against the Revisions, the civilians suddenly turn their opinion 180° again. Iirc they said that like 100 people died or sth. That's probably why they did it, but why would you do all this offscreen? This made it seem like nothing special happened and they just changed opinion for no reason.

On top of that the writing is where it's even worse at. There is no sense of mystery if the biggest questions are just casually revealed out of nowhere right at the start. Why would they explain the reason why Shibuya is in the future in the first 3 episodes. This would usually be the main mystery in any other anime and takes away all the interesting aspects if you answer that straight away. Or when Milo completely out of nowhere tells us she suddenly got the mission to help them in the past. Why would you do that straight in the middle of the show? Or the time when they get the additional two mechs, they had no problems getting them when any clever show would put some kind of obstacle in their way.

It seems that they aren't aware how to turn this into an interesting story. The writing is all over the place and seems completely random at some points. Idk if you've ever analyzed story writing in an anime or manga to find out what the most essential parts of story writing are. But Revisions is missing nearly all of them. It is pretty apparent that the premise is way too much to handle for whoever came up with the story.

To give an example of how a sci-fi, mystery, mecha show is done right, watch SSSS.Gridman if you haven't already seen it.
Modified by TheEnhancedExe, Yesterday, 9:47 PM
 
#9
Today, 5:41 AM

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TheEnhancedExe said:

It looks like they researched how characters would act in a state of emergency in a real situation. But applied to this kind of situation their actions don't make a lot of sense and feel forced. Especially the civilians who just randomly demonstrate at the beginning in front of the mayor although it's obvious he can't answer any questions about what happened.


That's exactly where we happen to disagree. By and large, the initial situation in Shibuya is equivalent to a state of emergency. During a crisis, communities want their local governments to help them (especially if they cannot reach the national administration either, like in this case) and properly explain the situation. Fear and lack of knowledge creates the potential for tensions and misunderstandings.

That's why you see real life incidents where insufficient government responses lead to some form of protest or public backlash. Which doesn't always need to come from the majority of the population. It's enough for only a fraction of people to have that reaction. It's not like all of Shibuya is part of that initial demand for explanations.

If my internet and phone calls didn't work, the last thing I would do would be going to the mayor. I would assume my provider is at fault. And if there were large ruins around the city how do people expect the mayor to answer that if communication doesn't work at all.


Citizens usually expect their elected representatives and local government officials to maintain a degree of organization and restore order during a crisis. This applies to any number of fields.

To use your example, if I don't receive any real or satisfactory answers from my Internet provider, the logical next step would be to progressively move up the ladder and ultimately contact the national authorities who are in charge of supervising the sector.

Normally you can do this with a simple phone call, going to a relevant office or by sending an e-mail or letter. All of that takes time and, under normal conditions, people are willing to wait.

However, the situation portrayed in the early episodes of this anime is clearly not normal. Tensions would rise, especially when the whole city has just been transported to another location and cut off from the outside world. External call centers would be unreachable, crowds would gather without gaining any useful information, some random monsters have started appearing thus creating an additional source of stress and fear, etc.

None of that suggests every single person would take this calmly. Pressuring the Mayor to figure something out is, in my opinion, to be expected. And again, it's not like everyone is doing so.

Then when the Revisions told the people they could go back in time when they gave them the mechs back, they were way too easy to believe them. They literally just accepted a small apology from them that they killed some people. Also this is way too fishy and was an obvious trap from the start, though this is more an issue of bad writing here since characters can't be aware of obvious anime tropes.


This is yet another point of disagreement between us. Desperate times can make for desperate measures, especially if someone (the Revisions) is directly offering a quick and easy way out. Why do you think so many people join up with strange cults, sects and fake religions? Some people will go ahead and take whatever they can get, even if it sounds like craziness at a glance. If your whole city is now surrounded by an apocalyptic landscape, your sense of reality should start to crumble.

Milo certainly wasn't giving them another attractive option, thus it's easy to imagine why a number of folks would side with the alternative path. Regardless of the apology being nothing more than a weak formality, the offer to send a select number of people back (including the Mayor, who was portrayed as arrogant and self-serving) would seem tempting under the circumstances. Not to the more skeptical and rational minds, but not everyone can be sophisticated and patient. Far from it.

I'd consider this to be more stereotypical, as in something we've seen before, rather than bad.

Also, on top of that, once they get the mechs back and fight against the Revisions, the civilians suddenly turn their opinion 180° again. Iirc they said that like 100 people died or sth. That's probably why they did it, but why would you do all this offscreen? This made it seem like nothing special happened and they just changed opinion for no reason.


Furthermore, the killing also meant that the Revisions weren't going to honor their original promise either, so logically enough such an outcome would likely change opinions back and forth. Did we see the entire process? Not necessarily, but the show did present the key information to us. I will give you some credit, however, because the pacing did move through events rather quickly. Still, that's not the same as "nothing happening" or "changing opinions for no reason" though.

On top of that the writing is where it's even worse at. There is no sense of mystery if the biggest questions are just casually revealed out of nowhere right at the start. Why would they explain the reason why Shibuya is in the future in the first 3 episodes. This would usually be the main mystery in any other anime and takes away all the interesting aspects if you answer that straight away. Or when Milo completely out of nowhere tells us she suddenly got the mission to help them in the past. Why would you do that straight in the middle of the show? Or the time when they get the additional two mechs, they had no problems getting them when any clever show would put some kind of obstacle in their way.


Not surprisingly, I honestly don't see it that way. This feels like an underlying difference of opinion about what should have been the core of the story's mystery, one way or another, rather than meaning there's something automatically flawed.

Why shouldn't they tell us what was going on? If the series had more episodes, such as 24 or 26 for instance, then perhaps they could have delayed some of the initial explanations. But, considering that this is only a 12 episode show (the sequel tease is nothing more than symbolic right now), it's to be expected that some details and relevant answers would start appearing after three or four episodes. So yes, we did get a decent amount of information early on, but I consider that as a positive rather than a negative.

In addition, I don't think we were told everything right out of the gate either. Just enough to establish the new setting, the general direction of the story and the basic rules, so to speak. Leaving us completely in the dark doesn't seem like a good thing, in and of itself, unless the series was structured completely differently to begin with. Yet, I'd argue that not all viewers would want to watch a series without even knowing where the basic premise is going either. Therefore, I feel this is a matter of personal interest.

Even knowing that Shibuya has been transported into the future didn't mean there were no other mysteries left. In fact, we even got a couple of new ones (or elaborations on older ones, for that matter, which turned out to be more important in the long run) as the rest of the story progressed. Which takes us to your other question. I believe Milo's mission was referenced a few times and discussed by the characters, even if briefly, before she finally announced that the order came in. Only the specific timing could have been a bit surprising, in my view, not the fact that it was going to happen. After all, it was already portrayed during the prologue. In other words, it doesn't qualify as much of a writing flaw. If anything, I'd consider it as part of following up on the foreshadowing.

It seems that they aren't aware how to turn this into an interesting story. The writing is all over the place and seems completely random at some points. Idk if you've ever analyzed story writing in an anime or manga to find out what the most essential parts of story writing are. But Revisions is missing nearly all of them. It is pretty apparent that the premise is way too much to handle for whoever came up with the story.


I'd argue this is perhaps the most inherently subjective and thus potentially divisive part of the discussion. What makes a story "interesting" or "boring" is, to say the least, always up for debate. Everyone in the world doesn't automatically want or expect the same result from a story. This goes for both the creators and the audience, since there is no such thing as universal agreement on either side.

It all depends on what are the specific tastes, preferences, interests, values and expectations of each individual person. Clearly, we didn't happen to share all of these. And that's fine.

For example, Infinite Ryvius is one of my favorite classic sci-fi anime. I like it a lot and, without getting into all the finer details here and now, that particular experience has probaby shaped my expectations for Revisions. It explains a key part of why my opinion is much more positive than yours. The two shows aren't identicial, of course, but they do share certain themes and methods. Conversely, there are people who find Infinite Ryvius to be an utterly boring series and simply dislike the characters. That's a valid opinion too, but it doesn't nullify my own.

Similarly, there is more than one way to carry out an analysis of story writing. Something can seem "apparent" for you and yet, at the same time, not so much in the eyes of another person. Neither of us is necessarily wrong. We simply don't have the same mindset. Based on my decades of existence on this planet and all the media I've consumed over the years, I think Revisions has all the minimum or "essential" elements to tell a standard quality story.

Why? Because I believe you can write different types of stories with their own approaches and people can experience each of them differently. We can watch the same work of fiction and reach separate or even opposite reactions. Otherwise, people would all want to see the same things and reach some entirely uniform conclusions. Such an existence would be colorless, linear and boring.

To give an example of how a sci-fi, mystery, mecha show is done right, watch SSSS.Gridman if you haven't already seen it.


Curiously enough, I have been watching SSSS.Gridman lately. It's good, no doubt, but I think that's certainly not the only way to create a sci-fi anime. Far from it. Revisions doesn't need to be exactly like that. They're two shows with very different priorities, goals and methods. It would be a good model to follow in terms of popularity, of course, but then again part of that had to do with superficial aspects like the use of 2D animation vs 3D animation (if Revisions were fully 2D, folks would be less turned off by default). .

For that matter, I'd suggest watching Infinite Ryvius instead, since it might address your specific complaint about events happening too fast here, but I obviously can't guarantee you'll enjoy that series (maybe you'll hate the cast of characters even more in that one).
Modified by ZakuCustom, Today, 6:09 AM
 
11 hours ago
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ZakuCustom said:


That's exactly where we happen to disagree. By and large, the initial situation in Shibuya is equivalent to a state of emergency. During a crisis, communities want their local governments to help them (especially if they cannot reach the national administration either, like in this case) and properly explain the situation. Fear and lack of knowledge creates the potential for tensions and misunderstandings.


The problem herein lies that most people definitely weren't aware that there were ruins around the city or Revisions running around killing people. This becomes pretty apparent once the people call the mayor a dictator before he did anything bad, just because he proclaimed the state of Shibuya. If they were aware of the circumstances, they wouldn't call him a dictator. They assume he is one because they're assuming he wants to split from Japan which is none existant in this time. If they were aware of that they wouldn't call him a dictator.

My second point is, why didn't the mayor go out and explain the situation to the masses then? This is how any mayor would act in real life if he were in the same situation. Open the window, go out on a balcony if there's one and talk to the masses. This one decided to just hide and only hold some sort of conference in a small room with limited amount of viewers. Also we never see him explaining the situation to the people at all.

Then there's the sudden turn where just because the mayor decides to help the revisions, they all suddenly go from calling him a dictator to doing his every bidding. And literally everyone was doing that apart from a select few in the double digit number. People's opinion don't take a 180° like that, not even in a crisis.


Citizens usually expect their elected representatives and local government officials to maintain a degree of organization and restore order during a crisis. This applies to any number of fields.


Makes sense, I give you that point.

To use your example, if I don't receive any real or satisfactory answers from my Internet provider, the logical next step would be to progressively move up the ladder and ultimately contact the national authorities who are in charge of supervising the sector.


If anything I would go to the closest shop of my provider and ask the person working there what's wrong. The national authorities don't have anything to do with my internet provider, so if the internet and phone calls don't work, the national authorities won't know why this is the case and won't be able to tell me how long it takes until the internet is back. So why should I even consider asking them if it's obvious they can't answer any of these questions anyways, because they have no direct correlation with the provider. Idk how the situation is in Japan, but I don't think the government is the internet provider or closely works together with them similar to how it's probably the case in countries like China or Russia. In my country, they would tell me to go ask my internet provider if I went to ask the mayor.

This is yet another point of disagreement between us. Desperate times can make for desperate measures, especially if someone (the Revisions) is directly offering a quick and easy way out. Why do you think so many people join up with strange cults, sects and fake religions? Some people will go ahead and take whatever they can get, even if it sounds like craziness at a glance. If your whole city is now surrounded by an apocalyptic landscape, your sense of reality should start to crumble.


The problem is that literally everyone outside the characters we know straight up decides it is a good decision to trust them. Normally a good chunk of people would be the other way around and ask why should we trust you. I mean people even did the same with Milo, so why do they distrust Milo but easily trust the Revisions? The anime could've gone out of its way to show some random people distrusting the Revisions with a few very short moments, but it didn't do so. Both the revisions and Milo didn't prove that they could trust them, yet for some reason they decided to all turn 180° and trust the revisions because of what they offered. So it's the fact that 99% of the people suddenly turned their opinion 180° that bothers me, not the fact that people were trusting the revisions at all. If it was a lower amount, it would've made sense, but the way they did it, it doesn't.

Furthermore, the killing also meant that the Revisions weren't going to honor their original promise either, so logically enough such an outcome would likely change opinions back and forth. Did we see the entire process? Not necessarily, but the show did present the key information to us. I will give you some credit, however, because the pacing did move through events rather quickly. Still, that's not the same as "nothing happening" or "changing opinions for no reason" though.


I never said it bothered me that they changed the opinion again, it bothered me that they didn't show people dying and just mentioned it as if it was nothing special. If anything showing the shocked faces of civilians and how Daisuke and co defeat the Revisions would've been a great way to show us what exactly drove the civilians to suddenly trust them and accept Daisuke. However all they did was mention that 100 people died and Daisuke beat the revisions and now everyone likes him. Why do all this offscreen? That's as if I were to cut out a major plot point out of a popular anime and just replaced it with a short explanation of what happened. It's basically as if the director said "nothing special happened, you didn't miss anything" although we missed quite a lot.

Why shouldn't they tell us what was going on?


It's not that they shouldn't tell you what's going on. Rather it is more about when to reveal what's going on. If you're doing a mystery show you want people to try and guess the solution to the mystery only to reveal the mystery at the end of the series. This is why almost all anime with mysteries tend to reveal their biggest mysteries near the end of the show.

However if three episodes in, a character literally explains all the interesting mysteries the show has left, what's the point in continuing through the end if all the most important questions were already answered at the beginning. While it looks like it wasn't intended to be the main mystery, they certainly made it look that way until they revealed everything out of nowhere. That's not how mystery anime works.

Also usually, when mystery anime uncover a mystery during the middle of the show, they only answer very little and uncover more stuff, the more the show progresses. If you uncover nearly all at once, that takes away all the excitement. Especially when it's uncovered during a casual talk during a car drive, so under no special circumstances. If you uncover the stuff, during a dramatic scene instead, it creates way more tension.

Only the specific timing could have been a bit surprising, in my view, not the fact that it was going to happen


Yeah, it was obvious it was going to happen, but as you said it was the specific timing that was botherint me. To me it looked like some sort of setup for the final climax, that she would need to go to the past to solve the final climax. Tbh, I haven't seen past episode 4 yet, but to me it currently looks like we'll get an answer to what happened in the past by episode 5 or 6 and then there's another big mystery gone that could've been part of the main mystery. I don't see how there would be any big mystery left after that.

I'd argue this is perhaps the most inherently subjective and thus potentially divisive part of the discussion. What makes a story "interesting" or "boring" is, to say the least, always up for debate. Everyone in the world doesn't automatically want or expect the same result from a story. This goes for both the creators and the audience, since there is no such thing as universal agreement on either side.

It all depends on what are the specific tastes, preferences, interests, values and expectations of each individual person. Clearly, we didn't happen to share all of these. And that's fine.


I'm not trying to say all people should have the same or a similar taste. If I came across that way then sorry. I know everyone has their own tastes and that's completely fine.

What I wanted to tell is that the show itself doesn't speak to a broad audience. The things it does don't set it apart from any other anime. The anime doesn't give me the feeling that it wants to appeal to as many people as possible. Usually whenever, I don't enjoy an anime, I can at least see why people like it. Because these kind of anime usually aren't necessarily bad written, but are either just boring or I just don't like certain aspects. And if a popular anime has bad writing, it usually has some sort of charme to it that makes me understand why people like it.

Revisions however imo neither has charme nor good writing. I would see myself as someone with a pretty average taste. I like most high rated anime and I dislike most low rated anime. There are a few exceptions which are mainly high rated anime that I don't enjoy. However basically all low rated anime I've seen so far also deserved it imo. The only anime below 7.5 rating on MAL that I think is underrated is Gridman.

What I want to say is that usually, it's pretty easy for me to guess whether a show will do well or not because my taste is so average. I'm also an avid manga reader and I correctly predicted which mangas would surivive in Weekly Shounen Jump and which would get cancelled for 15 new manga straight. The only time I was wrong was because the story of the manga picked up after the first few chapters and I hadn't read them because they weren't translated at that point. Basically, through analyzing a lot of manga chapters, I think I've gotten to the point where I can tell when lots of people will like a series and when not.

In the case of Revisions, it's already noticeable by the rating that it isn't popular, but it still has the same kind of issues that the mangas had that ended up failing in Weekly Shounen Jump. While the genre is different, I think I can apply the same to all kinds of genre as long as I don't dislike the genre itself.

So what I wanted to say is that Revisions doesn't have what it takes to become a show with a decent rating. While there certainly are people like you who enjoy it, it doesn't make much to stand out which is why the majority won't enjoy it. Just like with new manga in Shounen Jump, there's always people who claim an already cancelled manga deserved to survive because they themselves thought it was good. But what counts in the end is what the majority thinks and if the majority doesn't like sth, then it's usually deserved if a manga gets cancelled. Just how in this case, if the majority thinks it isn't good enough to get a decent rank, then it isn't. Of course, people like you can have a different opinion if they like the anime, but in the end the majority decides if sth is considered a good anime/manga or not.

Curiously enough, I have been watching SSSS.Gridman lately. It's good, no doubt, but I think that's certainly not the only way to create a sci-fi anime. Far from it. Revisions doesn't need to be exactly like that. They're two shows with very different priorities, goals and methods. It would be a good model to follow in terms of popularity, of course, but then again part of that had to do with superficial aspects like the use of 2D animation vs 3D animation (if Revisions were fully 2D, folks would be less turned off by default). .

For that matter, I'd suggest watching Infinite Ryvius instead, since it might address your specific complaint about events happening too fast here, but I obviously can't guarantee you'll enjoy that series (maybe you'll hate the cast of characters even more in that one).


Yeah, I'm aware that they're two different series and have two different approaches. However I think Revisions feels as if it handicapped itself right from the start because the premise is very hard to fulfill. Managing a whole city that has been brought to the future is a way harder job than just needing to manage your core cast. Which is imo what Revisions fails at. If it was just the main characters brought into the future, I guess it would've managed to be just fine. However because they tried too hard and do sth original that hasn't been done before, the execution failed.

Gridman knows its boundaries, when to be realistic and when it's ok to be unrealistic. It never tries too hard to be realistic nor does it matter that some unrealistic stuff happens because we were shown right from the first episode that it isn't supposed to be realistic. Revisions, apart from Shibuya being transported into the future and the revisions appearing, still tries to be as realistic as possible despite these circumstances. It tries so hard that the stuff that is supposed to be realistic becomes unrealistic.

If the whole premise wasn't that complex and was way simpler instead, this wouldn't have happened. That's also why you often hear people say that the cooler a premise sounds, the worse the show is. Simply because really complex premises often sound cool, but are so incredibly hard to execute that the show fails at trying. That's why lots of popular shows have premises that are either short or sound bland. Simply because people will go in with lower expectations and then are surprised about how good the show is.

On the other hand, the more complex the premise, the higher the expectations which in most cases can't be fulfilled. Btw, I went into this show with already low expectations because I'm aware that complex premises in most cases aren't good for that particular anime. At least the only popular show with a complex plot that I can come up with is Gate, which I haven't seen yet and probably won't enjoy either.

About 2D vs 3D, while I don't necessarily like the 3D animation in Revisions, I can still accept it. I'm not someone to rank a show really low just because of CG. Though Gridman uses lots of CG as well and it looks infinitely better imo.

As for Infinite Ryvius, I'll put it on my plan to watch list, but probably won't watch it anytime soon. I'm usually not someone to hate a cast of characters very fast. The only characters I really dislike in Revisions are Daisuke, Lu's brother (forgot the name) and the mayor, which is already plenty more than usual. The other characters are more or less nothing special so far. Even if characters are bad written, that isn't enough to make me hate them.
 
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