Forum Settings
Forums
#1
Oct 30, 2018 12:49 PM

Offline
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 466
I was just thinking about has anime actually ever helped me learn anything of value and was wondering if there is many anime out there that can be very insightful in to a certain subject.

When I thought about this topic, the first thing that came to mind was when I watched Bakuman and it helped me learn about the process of what it is like to be a mangaka, to an extent. And also it helped me to become more understanding and empathetic towards mangaka and the harsh grind of the life of a and the health problems this can cause.

So have you watched any anime that has informed you deeply about a subject?
Was this information of any value to you?
Did this change you in any way?
Do you have any recommendations for insightful anime?



#AntiSadMadokaGang
 
#2
Oct 30, 2018 12:54 PM
Offline
Joined: Jul 2018
Posts: 0
Clannad taught me that having a family in which to spend a life with them is a truly wonderful thing.
 
#3
Oct 30, 2018 12:56 PM

Offline
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 119
Since you mentioned Bakuman, I'd say Shirobako is similar to that only dealing with anime production. Other than that Hataraku Saibou (inside of human body anime) comes to mind, since it aired recently.
 
#4
Oct 30, 2018 12:58 PM
Die

Offline
Joined: Aug 2015
Posts: 695
Naruto, because it taught me to never give up!

Or some other cringy line like that.
 
#5
Oct 30, 2018 1:00 PM

Offline
Joined: Sep 2018
Posts: 862
Otaku no Video is a borderline documentary about otakus. It’s got a simple story about a guy becoming an otaku but finding money and success after making an anime with some other fellow otakus, but its weird because it’ll stop the story and show an actual live action real interview with a real otaku and kind of talks about what their life is like, what their interests are, and how they feel. really strange but if you find stuff like that somewhat interesting like me it’s there.

There’s also Gaikotsu Shotenin Honda-san, which is currently airing. It’s about the daily struggles of employees at a bookstore. A funny, short, and simple little comedy I really enjoy, and the original author says it’s actually about his own experiences working in a bookstore.

I haven’t seen Shirobako yet, but I have heard it’s a pretty funny and realistic look into how anime is made and what it’s like working in the industry.
 
#6
Oct 30, 2018 1:16 PM

Offline
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 514
attack on titan taught me how to defend humanity
 
#7
Oct 30, 2018 1:22 PM

Online
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 2571
Love is like a Cocktail taught me how to create alcoholic beverages. literally
'On-Hold' is another way for a completionist to say 'Dropped'


 
#8
Oct 30, 2018 1:25 PM

Offline
Joined: Mar 2018
Posts: 522
I learned a good deal about the "hikikomori" lifestyle (which from what I understand is considered a major social issue in Japan) and, to a lesser extent, otaku culture from Welcome to the NHK.
 
#9
Oct 30, 2018 1:25 PM
Offline
Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 31071
Actually a lot. I mean, obviously there will be more efficient ways to learn about a topic, but not often more entertaining ones.

One of the prime genres for this has to be sports for me. I learned basically everything I know about american football and baseball and boxing from sports anime, and even with sports I'm familiar with since I was a child like soccer or basketball or tennis, series can often give insight into stuff I didn't know, like training methods or technology, certain strategies, certain rules, bits of historical information about the sport etc...

I'd also include game-based anime in that. I learned about karuta from Chihayafuru and about Riichi Mahjong from a bunch of different anime, and about Go from Hikaru no Go. Although on average these shows tend to go less into detail with the rules and stuff, but they're still a starting point that can get you familiar with the main aspects and the vocabulary at least.



The second large field of anime like that are workplace s-o-l shows for me. They are usually well-researched and interesting, albeit often naturally dramatized. Among the more informative ones were probably:
Bakuman, which you already mentioned.
Fune wo Amu, which made me learn a lot about how dictionaries are made.
Shirobako, which gave some insight into the processes and jobs involved in the creation of anime.
Gallery Fake, which was about a black market arts dealer and included a ton of trivia and information about all areas and kinds of art, from important historical pieces and their history to techniques of repairing damaged artwork and various niche collectors item and the general mechanics of art dealing.
Rakugo, which included a lot of info on rakugo in general (which I barely even knew existed before that anime), its development over a couple of decades and the society of those decades it is set in.
Bartender or Love is like a Cocktail which give you recipes for various cocktails.
And basically every cooking or baking anime ever, also giving you recipes (as wella s trivia about certain ingredients sometimes).

But there's plenty of other job-based anime that can provide you various amounts of information about the issues they have to deal with on a day-to-day basis. The currently airing Honda-san does it with book-store employees, Gin no Saji (although not technically being a workplace) does it with ageiculture and microbes.



The third and probably main group of anime like that are actual educational anime. Anime de Wakaru Shinryounaika is probably one of the most obvious examples since it teaches about mental issues and is all based on medical facts, although it has a comedic tone to counterbalance the serious topic. But there are also some less obvious examples like Galko-chan or 12-sai which try to be informative about girl-specific issues while growing age, albeit it both handling different age groups. Then there is something like Element Hunters which has a random sci-fi story but each episode kinda teaches the viewers about some part of the periodic table and it felt very much educational on purpose to me, with the plot just being the means to an end.


Then there's more vague ways of 'learning' about something. For example Aoi Bungaku made me learn about the existence and the gist of the story of a bunch of japanese classic novels, by adapting them into short arcs.

There's also anime about the bible or one anime (Buddha Saitan) that was made by some cult and is probably informative about their weird worldviews (I haven't seen it yet) since it is essentially a propaganda video.

Speaking of propaganda, watching animated propaganda from the second world war is also informative in its own way. Watching historical animations from older decades (like before the industry started in the 60s) in general is informative about the historical development of anime back then.

Certain independent and experimental shorts have made me learn about new animation techniques, albeit not in all detail ofc since I wasn't watching a making of.

And of course watching historical anime can teach you some details of that time in history, like Lone Wolf and Cub (manga) about the tokugawa era, Hidamari no Ki about the end of Tokugawa era or Kenshin about the Meiji era. Even if the actual main story is often not historical, they will still reference a ton of historical characters and events while moving through the plot. But it can also be educational to just get a general feel of the lifestyle in a specific historical time period. How the people lived and felt. You don't even need specific historical events.

Heck, even sci-fi anime can be informative, like Uchuu Kyoudai or Planetes. Planetes taught me about the Helium reserves on the moon, for example. In general it's very well researched, the author goes into great detail about his research and how he tries to base everything on actual science, although moreso in the manga than in the anime. And Uchuu Kyoudai also felt pretty well researched, giving insight into various different areas of space exploration, some of which are traditionally not focused on as much, like engineers.


There's also of course shows that combine multiple of these aspects. In the end, there's a lot to learn or at least information to soak up if you know where to look and what to pay attention to. And rarely at the cost of being entertaining, rather I usually find it to be included in ways that only benefit the viewing experience, with some exceptions that are too 'educational', like Element Hunters.



Listen, everybody wants change, don't nobody want to change though
don't nobody want to pray, till they got something to pray for
now everybody's gonna die, but don't everybody live though
 
Oct 30, 2018 1:35 PM
Forum Moderator
Scary Person

Offline
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 9613
I guess Terraformers provided some interesting facts about species of animals but aside from that, I don't think there's been an anime that has taught me anything useful. Shows like shokugeki teach a few tips here and there about cooking, but I doubt I'd be using most of it lol.

 
Oct 30, 2018 1:44 PM

Offline
Joined: Apr 2017
Posts: 555
Imouto Sae Ireba Ii, the mc has taught me to be myself and be "the protagonist of my life" aiming higher and higher (something that I would never have expected from such an anime).
 
Oct 30, 2018 1:45 PM
Offline
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 2491
I watch anime for entertainment, not to learn
 
Oct 30, 2018 1:59 PM

Offline
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 1799
I can honestly say I've never learned anything of practical value from watching anime.
Life Is Short But Intense.
 
Oct 30, 2018 2:00 PM

Offline
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 509
Lol, if it weren't for One Outs, I wouldn't have realized that baseball requires you to step on the bases in a particular order. You never think about that when you watch a game and everyone is playing that way.

It's mostly bits and pieces of trivia for me. Tondekeman is a time travel show, so you get some random historical figures and what they did. Kaori Mori's manga contains extensive research on the setting so Victorian Romance Emma showcases life in London. And then Yakitate Japan sorta-kinda teaches you about bread even if I can't take them seriously.
 
Oct 30, 2018 2:04 PM

Online
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 9901
@Pullman has gone pretty heavily into different ways an anime can be informative; to add more recent examples there's for instance Hataraku Saibou which is very direct in its educational purpose and has every detail about how human physiology is depicted explained and put in context by a narrator. Or Yuru Camp, which shows locations and includes tips and explanations on camping gear and activities, and is also very informative in a more passive way due to its procedural nature. One is clearly didactic in premise, the other is by virtue of being a hobby anime. I'd say these are the two main types of informative shows, and the second could be expanded as Pullman said to workplace or sports, the latter being a genre of its own.
 
Oct 30, 2018 2:06 PM

Offline
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 466
holiday498 said:
Since you mentioned Bakuman, I'd say Shirobako is similar to that only dealing with anime production. Other than that Hataraku Saibou (inside of human body anime) comes to mind, since it aired recently.


I've heard about Shirobako before, since it is similar to Bakuman I will add it to my PTW.

juiccbox said:
Otaku no Video is a borderline documentary about otakus. It’s got a simple story about a guy becoming an otaku but finding money and success after making an anime with some other fellow otakus, but its weird because it’ll stop the story and show an actual live action real interview with a real otaku and kind of talks about what their life is like, what their interests are, and how they feel. really strange but if you find stuff like that somewhat interesting like me it’s there.

There’s also Gaikotsu Shotenin Honda-san, which is currently airing. It’s about the daily struggles of employees at a bookstore. A funny, short, and simple little comedy I really enjoy, and the original author says it’s actually about his own experiences working in a bookstore.


Otaku no video sounds like an interesting show and I do like shows that are a little abnormal, I'll add that to my PTW.

@Pullman I recognise multiple shows from that massive post haha. I've always been intrigued by Chihayafuru and it looks really pretty. I've been meaning to watch Gin no Saji as well for quite a bit since it is written by the same author as Fullmetal Alchemist I am pretty sure. I'll bump these up priority list. :P Thank you for your very in depth post.



#AntiSadMadokaGang
 
Oct 31, 2018 10:15 AM
美乃滋

Offline
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 2652
yeah there are a few that I find informative
yuru camp teaches me tons of useful tips about camping + outdoor activities
hajime no ippo allows me to understand what boxing is and the rules of it
shokugeki no soma provides a lot of facts and knowledge related to foreign cuisine
you mean changing me as a person?
I do not think so but I did grow from them knowledge-wise



 
Oct 31, 2018 10:20 AM

Offline
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 637
Hataraku Saibou is pretty educational when it comes to the biology of the inside of your body for example. Pretty fun series!
 
Oct 31, 2018 10:22 AM
The Dub Queen

Offline
Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 974
DepravedMagi said:
I watch anime for entertainment, not to learn


But learning something new while enjoying the anime won't hurt, just saying.
 
Oct 31, 2018 10:32 AM

Offline
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 891
I found sports anime to be the most entertaining and informative at the same time.




when all else fails
take a nap



 
Oct 31, 2018 10:40 AM

Offline
Joined: Feb 2018
Posts: 5182
Anime thought me that blue haired women are the most beautiful.
Go read the One Punch Man manga please, this awful adaptation by JC Staff is a disgrace.
 
Oct 31, 2018 10:53 AM

Offline
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 83
I know it is recent, but Cells at Work taught me quite a few things. I'm watching a youtuber who is a doctor that reviews the accuracy of the show and it seems to line up pretty well. Through those two mediums, I am learning quite a bit.
 
Oct 31, 2018 11:19 AM
Offline
Joined: Jul 2015
Posts: 578
The anime can not teach me anything unless I interpret a message as a teaching, which is ridiculous for me.
10 months without animu, and you?
 
Oct 31, 2018 11:43 AM

Offline
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 1985
@Pullman spreading his knowledge as always. Sasuga Pullman.

OT: There are anime like Yuru Camp and Yama no Susume which deal with hobbies. In this case, camping and mountain climbing, respectively. You can find a lot these anime which focus on one hobby or another. Theres also PA Works' 'Working Girls' trilogy which includes Shirobako (anime industry), Hanasaku Iroha (Japan's ryokan industry), and Sakura Quest, which deals with various professions.
 
Oct 31, 2018 12:50 PM

Offline
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 8738
Taylor3112 said:
So have you watched any anime that has informed you deeply about a subject?
Was this information of any value to you?
Did this change you in any way?
Do you have any recommendations for insightful anime?

* Yes, Chu-bra was unexpectedly informative. Because where else can a guy learn about women's underwear? It's not like Kokonoe Rin is an expert on the subject.

* You might find Sketchbook Full Colors informative on what it's like to be an artist.

* Centaur no Nayami gives a nice and fresh perspective on things. Its episode about abstract art was particularly informative.

* I also liked the parts about being a super-criminal from Nijuu Mensou no Musume.

But mostly, anime aren't very informative or trustworthy. Like, how would you tell Rocket Girls is very realistic, especially compared to Clockwork Planet, without prior knowledge?
What about Soukou no Strain versus Geneshaft?

 
Oct 31, 2018 2:31 PM
Forum Moderator
Top Aidoru ♪

Offline
Joined: Jan 2010
Posts: 5942
In addition to the shows mentioned in this thread:

Akagi made me take a crash course on mahjong, including playing multiple games over a few days to understand why and how Akagi is so ridiculous.

Aoi Bungaku introduced me to a lot of literary works, specifically the works of Ryūnosuke Akutagawa which were really interesting to dive into.

Tokyo Tribe 2 taught me that there was, in fact, a rap and hiphop scene in Japan, and it led me to finding a number of artists including Zorn, Kohh, Wednesday Campanella, Salu, and Young Dais.
 
Oct 31, 2018 2:39 PM

Offline
Joined: Jan 2013
Posts: 13201
Ashita no Joe has taught me boxing attack names

GTO has taught me that bullying is one of the biggest problems in Japan
 
Oct 31, 2018 2:42 PM

Offline
Joined: Jun 2017
Posts: 55
justcaolan said:
attack on titan taught me how to defend humanity


FMA taught me how to tip my fedora properly
 
Oct 31, 2018 4:50 PM

Offline
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 2511
Jikan no Shihaisha (not a show I can easily recommend) taught me about how time is limited, and that while you're out there creating your own life, time for other people doesn't stand still.
They also age, they also shape their own lives.
And if you wait too long, before you know some people may not be there anymore.

It made me reach out to my mother whom I've always had a very horrible relationship with.
I attempted the same with my father but to no avail.
 
Nov 1, 2018 11:24 PM

Offline
Joined: Oct 2018
Posts: 35
Hm, a tough decision as there are many series which can be said to teach a cat new tricks.
I would say Moyasimon, which some have called a spiritual predecessor of Hataraku Saibou. It teaches one many things about agriculture, the 'invisible world' we depend on, and the personal relationships and politics of people.
Another would be Sore ga Seiyuu, also known as the 'discount Shirobako'. It was an interesting look into the anime industry and voice acting in particular, even if heavily embellished and exaggerated as anime tends to, although to be fair slightly less than even Shirobako was. The interviews with famous voice actors playing themselves in the anime were very realistic and down to earth, including a very interesting scene involving an inquiry by the main character to the voice actors to voice their desires and the answer given was funny and realistic, even if materialistic. An interesting series that has marvelous voice actors teaching and giving great advice to the main characters and viewers most certainly worthy of mention.
{~𝕸𝖊𝖓 𝖔𝖋 𝕮𝖚𝖑𝖙𝖚𝖗𝖊 𝖉𝖔 𝖓𝖔𝖙 𝖍𝖆𝖛𝖊 𝕱𝖔𝖗𝖚𝖒 𝕾𝖎𝖌𝖓𝖆𝖙𝖚𝖗𝖊𝖘~}
 
Nov 1, 2018 11:42 PM

Offline
Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 294
Most slice of life anime offer useful information. But I will go with another example: Detective Conan. Many people don't watch it because it's long. But damn, you can find out so many things you've never thought of. Here's a small example:






 
Nov 2, 2018 1:19 AM

Offline
Joined: Apr 2012
Posts: 1302
One reasonably common pattern is "X geek loves X, makes manga about X which gets adapted into anime and tells viewers all sorts of things about X". Sora no Manimani for astronomy, Moonlight Mile for space exploration, Fune wo Amu for dictionaries etc. (I think tons of sports anime are like this, though I don't watch much sports anime. But Chihayafuru, for instance, that's so obviously a labour of love.) I like this pattern, even if they're dramatically shaky, there's a pleasing earnestness to them.
 
Nov 2, 2018 3:34 AM

Offline
Joined: Jan 2016
Posts: 447
besides only because "fun" the reason i stays watching anime is because i learn a lot from it. Especially from Slice of Life.
I really like intrapersonal thing, expressions, words, behavior, etc. I learn so much about it from sol anime, with it i can read people's faces or understand their feelings. Even though it's an anime so surely it's not very realistic but i got the pattern, atleast.
 
Nov 2, 2018 3:41 AM
Offline
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 373
Fairy tail taught me how to borrow power from tomorrow
 
Nov 2, 2018 3:54 AM

Offline
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 7574
A couple can teach you economics, martial arts, or useful ground combat strategies.
"Should I be concerned over the obvious delight our daughter takes in the ultra-violence?"
"It's genetic"
-Red Arrow to Cheshire (Young Justice)
 
Nov 2, 2018 4:56 AM

Offline
Joined: Apr 2015
Posts: 808
Propaganda animations from war-era show us how the nation viewed the war and tried to explain it to children. Same with war themed movies/series they show to outsider what that nation faced and in what happenings their history focus on, example Bombing of Tokyo doesn't get much focus on West compared to Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Usually progress goes more like this, hear of something you didn't know in a series->google to see if you find more about it
 
Nov 2, 2018 5:15 AM
Offline
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 10978
Depends on what you mean by informative.

But there are alot of gateway anime to certain things.
Shirobako - for Anime production industry.
New Game - For Game making
Haikyuu, Slam Dunk, Prince of Tennis - All introduce the sport in one way or the other.
Mister Ajiko, or Cooking Master Boy - Introduces food cultures and cooking techniques (In a very rough way).
Seiyuu - Introduces CV Actor industry.
Bamboo Blade - Introduces people to Kendo.
Hyouge no Mono - Japanese Pottery History and Sengoku History.

Alot of Anime and manga pretty much introduces the audience to a variety of different things, using the medium to make it more interesting.

Even dictionary making is a topic check out Fune wo Amu, it was quite informative, and also quite interesting in terms of the evolution of a language and words.

 
Nov 2, 2018 5:26 AM

Offline
Joined: Sep 2018
Posts: 112
as corny as it sounds..
k-on taught me people matter and ttgl taught me to persevere
uguu
Signature removed. Please follow the signature rules, as defined in the Site & Forum Guidelines.
 
Top