Old School Manga Club

Information
Welcome to this new club, i hope you will have loads of fun <div style="text-align: center;"> <img src="http://i744.photobucket.com/albums/xx81/Eridanus01/old%20school%20club%20pics/logo-1.png" /><!--center--></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 200%;"><span style="color:blue"><strong>History of Manga</strong><!--color--></span><!--size--></span> <strong><span style="color:red">Origins<!--color--></span></strong> <div class="spoiler"><input type="button" class="button" onClick="this.nextSibling.nextSibling.style.display='block';this.style.display='none';" value="Show spoiler"> <span class="spoiler_content" style="display:none"><input type="button" class="button" onClick="this.parentNode.style.display='none';this.parentNode.parentNode.childNodes[0].style.display='block';" value="Hide spoiler"><br>The History of manga originates from scrolls dating back to the 12th century, however whether these scrolls are actually manga is still disputed, though its believed they represent the basis for the right-to-left reading style. Other authors report origins closer to the 18th century. Manga is a Japanese term that generally means "comics" or "cartoon", literally "whimsical sketches." Historians and writers on manga history have described two broad and complementary processes shaping modern manga. Their views differ in the relative importance they attribute to the role of cultural and historical events following World War II versus the role of pre-War, Meiji, and pre-Meiji Japanese culture and art. It was the great Ukiyo-e-master, Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849), who first coined the term manga to describe a series of less serious sketches he produced in 15 volumes between 1814 and 1815. His work revealed Japanese culture and society alongside nature, but lacked the narratives found in contemporary manga. By the early 18th century, though, text began to appear with images in Toba-e woodblocks, so named after the scroll artist Toba Sojo. <!--spoiler--></span></div> <strong><span style="color:red">After World War II<!--color--></span></strong> <div class="spoiler"><input type="button" class="button" onClick="this.nextSibling.nextSibling.style.display='block';this.style.display='none';" value="Show spoiler"> <span class="spoiler_content" style="display:none"><input type="button" class="button" onClick="this.parentNode.style.display='none';this.parentNode.parentNode.childNodes[0].style.display='block';" value="Hide spoiler"><br>Modern manga originates in the Occupation (1945-1952) and post-Occupation years (1952-early 1960s), when a previously militaristic and ultranationalist Japan was rebuilding its political and economic infrastructure. Although U.S. Occupation censorship policies specifically prohibited art and writing that glorified war and Japanese militarism, those policies did not prevent the publication of other kinds of material, including manga. Furthermore, the 1947 Japanese Constitution (Article 21) prohibited all forms of censorship. One result was the growth of artistic creativity in this period. Tezuka's "cinematographic" technique as seen in Shin Takarajima (New Treasure Island). In the forefront of this period are two manga series and characters that influenced much of the future history of manga. These are Osamu Tezuka's Mighty Atom (Astro Boy in the United States; begun in 1951) and Machiko Hasegawa's Sazae-san (begun in 1946). Astro Boy was both a superpowered robot and a naive little boy. Tezuka never explained why Astro Boy had such a highly developed social conscience nor what kind of robot programming could make him so deeply affiliative. Both seem innate to Astro Boy, and represent a Japanese sociality and community-oriented masculinity differing very much from the Emperor-worship and militaristic obedience enforced during the previous period of Japanese imperialism. Astro Boy quickly became (and remains) immensely popular in Japan and elsewhere as an icon and hero of a new world of peace and the renunciation of war, as also seen in Article 9 of the Japanese constitution. Similar themes occur in Tezuka's New World and Metropolis. By contrast, Sazae-san (meaning "Ms. Sazae") was drawn starting in 1946 by Machiko Hasegawa, a young woman artist who made her heroine a stand-in for millions of Japanese men and especially women rendered homeless by the war. Sazae-san does not face an easy or simple life, but, like Astro Boy, she too is highly affiliative and is deeply involved with her immediate and extended family. She is also a very strong character, in striking contrast to the officially sanctioned Neo-Confucianist principles of feminine meekness and obedience to the "good wife, wise mother" ideal taught by the previous military regime. Sazae-san faces the world with cheerful resilience, what Hayao Kawai calls a "woman of endurance." Sazae-san sold more than 62 million copies over the next half century. Tezuka and Hasegawa were also both stylistic innovators. In Tezuka's "cinematographic" technique, the panels are like a motion picture that reveals details of action bordering on slow motion as well as rapid zooms from distance to close-up shots. This kind of visual dynamism was widely adopted by later manga artists. Hasegawa's focus on daily life and on women's experience also came to characterize later shojo manga. Between 1950 and 1969, increasingly large audiences for manga emerged in Japan with the solidification of its two main marketing genres, shonen manga aimed at boys and shojo manga aimed at girls. Up to 1969, shojo manga was drawn primarily by adult men for young female readers. Two very popular and influential male-authored manga for girls from this period were Tezuka's 1953-1956 Ribon no Kishi (Princess Knight or Knight in Ribbons) and Matsuteru Yokoyama's 1966 Mahotsukai Sarii (Little Witch Sally). Ribon no Kishi dealt with the adventures of Princess Sapphire of a fantasy kingdom who had been born with male and female souls, and whose sword-swinging battles and romances blurred the boundaries of otherwise rigid gender roles. Sarii, the pre-teen princess heroine of Mahotsukai Sarii, came from her home in the magical lands to live on Earth, go to school, and perform a variety of magical good deeds for her friends and schoolmates. Yokoyama's Mahotsukai Sarii was influenced by the U.S. TV sitcom Bewitched, but unlike Samantha, the main character of Bewitched, a married woman with her own daughter, Sarii is a pre-teenager who faces the problems of growing up and mastering the responsibilities of forthcoming adulthood. Mahotsukai Sarii helped create the now very popular maho shojo or "magical girl" sub-genre of later manga. Both series were and still are very popular<!--spoiler--></span></div> <strong><span style="color:red">Today</strong><!--color--></span> <div class="spoiler"><input type="button" class="button" onClick="this.nextSibling.nextSibling.style.display='block';this.style.display='none';" value="Show spoiler"> <span class="spoiler_content" style="display:none"><input type="button" class="button" onClick="this.parentNode.style.display='none';this.parentNode.parentNode.childNodes[0].style.display='block';" value="Hide spoiler"><br>Today, Japan has the largest comic market in the world. In 2004, no fewer than 1.4 billion titles were printed. Average manga series published in Japan have a circulation of 300,000 to 500,000 copies per volume—numbers that easily catapult books onto best-sellers lists in many other countries. At any given time, there are 250 to 300 different manga magazines on offer—weekly, biweekly or monthly—and there are titles directed at every age group, on nearly every subject. As the continuation of a centuries-old art form, manga form an integral part of Japanese culture.<!--spoiler--></span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 200%;"><strong>SOMETHING WORTH A TRY <span style="color:red"><u>Akira</u><!--color--></span></strong><!--size--></span> <img src="http://i744.photobucket.com/albums/xx81/Eridanus01/old%20school%20club%20pics/230px-Akira_Volume_1_Cover_Japanese_Version_Manga.jpg" /> <strong>Plot</strong> <div class="spoiler"><input type="button" class="button" onClick="this.nextSibling.nextSibling.style.display='block';this.style.display='none';" value="Show spoiler"> <span class="spoiler_content" style="display:none"><input type="button" class="button" onClick="this.parentNode.style.display='none';this.parentNode.parentNode.childNodes[0].style.display='block';" value="Hide spoiler"><br> Volume 1 On December 6, 1992 (1982 in the original version), an apparent nuclear explosion destroys Tokyo and starts World War III. By 2030 (2019 in the original version), a new metropolis called Neo-Tokyo has been built on an artificial island in Tokyo Bay, but is gripped by anti-government terrorism and gang violence. While riding in the ruins of old Tokyo, Tetsuo Shima, a member of the bosozoku Capsule gang led by Shotaro Kaneda, is injured when his bike explodes after the "Esper" Takashi—a psychic child with wizened features—blocks his path. This incident awakens psychic powers in Tetsuo, attracting the attention of a secret government project directed by Colonel Shikishima. These increasing powers unhinge Tetsuo's mind, exacerbating his inferiority complex about Kaneda and leading him to assume leadership of the rival Clown gang. Meanwhile, Kaneda becomes involved with Kei, a member of the Resistance organization which stages terrorist attacks against the government. The Resistance—led by Kei's brother Ryu and opposition parliament leader Nezu—gets wind of Colonel Shikishima's project and a mysterious figure connected with it known as "Akira". They hope to use this leaked information, and try to restrict Kaneda's movements after he becomes too involved with their activities. However, when Tetsuo and the Clowns begin a violent city-wide turf war, Kaneda instigates a counter-attack that unites all of Neo-Tokyo's biker gangs against Tetsuo. The Clowns are easily defeated, but Tetsuo is nearly invincible because of his powers. Tetsuo kills Yamagata, a high-ranking Capsule, and astonishingly survives after being shot by Kaneda. Colonel Shikishima arrives with the powerful drugs needed to suppress Tetsuo's violent headaches, extending an offer to join the project. <!--spoiler--></span></div> <img src="http://i744.photobucket.com/albums/xx81/Eridanus01/old%20school%20club%20pics/logo.jpg" /> <!--center--></div> <div style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="color:brown">Affiliated clubs:<!--color--></span></strong> <div class="spoiler"><input type="button" class="button" onClick="this.nextSibling.nextSibling.style.display='block';this.style.display='none';" value="Show spoiler"> <span class="spoiler_content" style="display:none"><input type="button" class="button" onClick="this.parentNode.style.display='none';this.parentNode.parentNode.childNodes[0].style.display='block';" value="Hide spoiler"><br><!--link--><a href="http://myanimelist.net/clubs.php?cid=18611"><img src="http://i744.photobucket.com/albums/xx81/Eridanus01/old%20school%20club%20pics/respecttheoldschoolopos11-21.jpg" /></a><!--spoiler--></span></div><!--center--></div> <!--spoiler--></span></div><!--spoiler--></span></div><!--center--></div><!--center--></div>


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Displaying 3 of 3 topics | See All
Club Discussion
Titles to add to the Relations List
Eridanus - May 4, 2010
20 replies by redrocketkid »»
Aug 12, 2015 6:41 AM
Guess The Manga By The Picture Game ( 1 2 )
Eridanus - May 17, 2010
56 replies by peroxid »»
Mar 8, 2011 10:36 AM
What would you like to see in the club?
Eridanus - May 2, 2010
2 replies by Eridanus »»
Jan 25, 2011 5:29 PM



Club Comments
Eridanus | Nov 19, 2020 7:52 AM
I leave for close to a decade and the information section break . . . tsk tsk tsk

redrocketkid | Mar 13, 2019 8:12 PM
So the information section on this club page is all out of whack now with broken HTML...

Energetic-Nova | Dec 24, 2015 5:07 AM
I know it has been years since people have posted in here but, I have been very excited that american publishers have been taking a chance on publishing Year 24 Group manga. So now I can legally read them. I don't really want to pirate things. So yeah. very excited.

Doaj | Aug 31, 2013 1:46 AM
Why has it been a year since anyone posted here? How depressing.

Eridanus | Jun 30, 2012 11:06 AM
Recomended the manga version of Akira on the club wall, it seems not many have read the manga version as have seen the anime version.
It is really something worth a try even if you didn't like the anime, the manga version is diferent and I believe it will capture you.

Captain_GARlock | May 19, 2012 9:13 PM
Yeah, I liked 2nd Gig better. Both were very enjoyable though.

mooncrypt | May 19, 2012 7:09 PM
SAC 2nd GIG sounds better than the first!! But I haven't watched yet :(

Captain_GARlock | May 19, 2012 4:01 PM
As far as the animated GitS products go, I actually found Standalone Complex more enjoyable than both films. I realise they take different directions and try to accomplish different things, though.

Club Stats
Members: 283
Pictures: 7
Category: Manga
Created: May 2, 2010


Club Admins and Officers
Eridanus (Admin, Creator)

Club Type
This is a public club.
Anyone can join and invite others to join. Club details, pictures, comments and club discussions can be viewed by any user, regardless of whether they are a member of the club or not.

Club Admins can change the Club Type at any time. For more information on Club Types, click here.

Manga Relations